Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFrank Pembleton
IN THE NEWS

Frank Pembleton

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 10, 2000
They did it. I didn't think they could. But by the end of tonight's premiere of "Gideon's Crossing," creator Paul Attanasio and star Andre Braugher made me forget Frank Pembleton, the landmark detective Attanasio invented and Braugher played on "Homicide: Life on the Street." I believe in Braugher's new character, Dr. Ben Gideon, chief of experimental medicine at a prestigious teaching hospital in Boston and last hope for the most critical of the critically ill. I don't know if I believe in the future of the series yet - it's opposite NBC's "Law & Order" in its regular time slot Wednesday nights at 10. But, if you are a fan of Braugher's work in "Homicide" and you crave quality drama, this is a pilot you do not want to miss.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
As the new network season arrives this week, a couple of old familiar Baltimore faces have caught my eye: Andre Braugher and Wendell Pierce. Happily, they are in two of the more promising series in an otherwise mostly lackluster field: “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” (Fox) and “The Michael J. Fox Show” (NBC). Neither is the headliner. “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” a sitcom set in a police precinct, stars Andy Samberg as Jake Peralta, a brilliant but impulsive young detective. “The Michael J. Fox Show” is a family comedy starring Fox as a New York anchorman who returns to the airwaves five years after retiring in the wake of being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
The folks who brought you seven years of "Homicide" are prepared to plea bargain with your nostalgia. You might even say they're on the take. Just show up at the detectives' squad room by the Fells Point waterfront tomorrow or Friday, and for $25 in cold cash you can lug home one of the investigators' battered old desks. Or, for about the same price, walk away in Detective Frank Pembleton's wool houndstooth overcoat, the very one he shivered in through the wee hours while standing over all those fake corpses and their fake pools of blood.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Streets" is going through some character changes this summer. Two are going, one is coming, and there's going to be even more of Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher), easily the most interesting African-American character in prime-time.Just as the critically acclaimed series finally won a measure of security in May with its first full order of 22 episodes from the network, it was announced that Ned Beatty and Daniel Baldwin were leaving the show.Beatty said he wanted to return to feature films.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 24, 1998
Last year at this time, the consensus was that "Homicide: Life on the Street" was starting its last season on NBC.Tomorrow, the critically acclaimed cop drama based in Baltimore will start its seventh year, and the end is now nowhere in sight.As the Emmy-Award-winning Andre Braugher put it in an interview last week, "If the quality of the writing is sustained, I believe the show has the potential to go on for many, many more years."And this, despite the loss of Braugher whose Frank Pembleton character handed in his badge last May after a shootout that left his partner, Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 19, 1999
The final episode for George Clooney as Dr. Douglas Ross on "ER" last night wasn't nearly as moving as Jimmy Smits' departure from "NYPD Blue" in November through the death of his character, Bobby Simone.In fact, after all the buildup, Clooney's last hour on "ER" after almost five seasons with the hit series felt like a bit of a letdown. A long kiss for the teary-eyed Carol Hathaway (Julianna Margulies) and a last lakefront chat with his best friend, Dr. Mark Greene (Anthony Edwards), and Ross was off to a new job in Portland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 30, 2000
Stanley Bolander (Ned Beatty) is retired and living in St Michael's. Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher) is teaching at a Jesuit college. And Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor) is standing in a river fly-fishing while taking an extended leave from police work. Those are the places that "Homicide: The Movie" finds some of our favorite detectives during its opening minutes. I know it is early to start beating the drum, with the NBC movie not airing until Sunday, Feb. 13, but the screening cassette arrived one recent morning and, of course, I put the rest of the day on hold and raced to the VCR to see what executive producer Tom Fontana and his colleagues have done with the "Homicide" crew since last we met in May. Is it worth marking your calendar?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 2000
Gee is dead, and actor Yaphet Kotto's not at all happy about it. If you saw "Homicide: The Movie" last night on NBC, you already know Lt. Al Giardello, the moral center of "Homicide: Life on the Street," died at the end, victim of an assassin's bullet. His death was one of the most dramatic moments in the series' celebrated history. Last week, Kotto, who has inhabited the body of Giardello for seven years, said he thinks more than just a great character is lost with the passing of Gee. He's disturbed that a positive African-American male figure has been killed off in our popular culture.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 14, 2001
Rage as shtick. In the end, that's what ABC's midseason police drama "The Job," starring Denis Leary as an unconventional and almost-out-of-control New York City detective, comes down to. It takes the profound, righteous, urban, cop-shop rage of an Andy Sipowicz (Dennis Franz of "NYPD Blue") or Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher of "Homicide: Life on the Street") and shrinks it to attitude and rant played for laughs rather than insight into our lives. This is television as the incredible shrinking culture machine, and I hate the medium when it takes the antisocial out of our sociology and refashions it into something safe, tame and even cute.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 10, 2000
They did it. I didn't think they could. But by the end of tonight's premiere of "Gideon's Crossing," creator Paul Attanasio and star Andre Braugher made me forget Frank Pembleton, the landmark detective Attanasio invented and Braugher played on "Homicide: Life on the Street." I believe in Braugher's new character, Dr. Ben Gideon, chief of experimental medicine at a prestigious teaching hospital in Boston and last hope for the most critical of the critically ill. I don't know if I believe in the future of the series yet - it's opposite NBC's "Law & Order" in its regular time slot Wednesday nights at 10. But, if you are a fan of Braugher's work in "Homicide" and you crave quality drama, this is a pilot you do not want to miss.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
The folks who brought you seven years of "Homicide" are prepared to plea bargain with your nostalgia. You might even say they're on the take. Just show up at the detectives' squad room by the Fells Point waterfront tomorrow or Friday, and for $25 in cold cash you can lug home one of the investigators' battered old desks. Or, for about the same price, walk away in Detective Frank Pembleton's wool houndstooth overcoat, the very one he shivered in through the wee hours while standing over all those fake corpses and their fake pools of blood.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 2000
Gee is dead, and actor Yaphet Kotto's not at all happy about it. If you saw "Homicide: The Movie" last night on NBC, you already know Lt. Al Giardello, the moral center of "Homicide: Life on the Street," died at the end, victim of an assassin's bullet. His death was one of the most dramatic moments in the series' celebrated history. Last week, Kotto, who has inhabited the body of Giardello for seven years, said he thinks more than just a great character is lost with the passing of Gee. He's disturbed that a positive African-American male figure has been killed off in our popular culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 13, 2000
Last year as "Homicide: Life on the Street" was fighting for its life, I happened to mention to executive producer Tom Fontana that the series had been praised by Kweisi Mfume, president of the NAACP. These accolades -- for the show's insights into race and social class -- had come during a taping of Mfume's "The Bottom Line" talk show that was devoted to "Homicide." "That's nice," Fontana said, cutting me off. "What would have been really nice, though, is if those words had meant some Image Awards from the NAACP for the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 6, 2000
If you've been following the making of "Homicide: The Movie" in these pages, you know that the premise has Lt. Al Giardello, the larger-than-life chief of the homicide bureau played by Yaphet Kotto, running for mayor of Baltimore. The event that brings most of the detectives, past and present, to the squad room for a "super-red-ball" investigation is an assassination attempt on Candidate Giar-dello as he is about to speak at an Inner Harbor rally. The assassin's bullets leave Giardello, one of the more empowered and complex African-American characters on television, fighting for his life in a hospital emergency room.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1995
After two helpings of Bertha's mussels with garlic butter, Andre Braugher wants a smoke. He steps outside the landmark Fells Point restaurant and commands a park bench, where he frees a Marlboro from the pack.A panhandler appears with a fresh black eye and a stale story. Mr. Braugher measures the man. Obviously, the guy is drunk and was just kicked out of a bar , says Mr. Braugher, who keeps his money in his pocket. "I wish I could give away skills."Andre Braugher's skill is acting. He plays "Homicide's" Detective Frank Pembleton -- the bald one in the big cast.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 17, 1996
There is no happily ever after on "Homicide: Life on the Street," so don't come looking for any happy endings in tonight's cliffhanger season finale, titled "Work Related."Last week, Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) was married in the Rose Room of the Belvedere Hotel with everybody merrily dancing the night away to a band straight out of "Twin Peaks." This week, Lewis admits to Kellerman (Reed Diamond) that he has yet to consummate his marriage and, in fact, his new wife, Barbara, has left him.'til death do you what?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 30, 2000
Stanley Bolander (Ned Beatty) is retired and living in St Michael's. Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher) is teaching at a Jesuit college. And Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor) is standing in a river fly-fishing while taking an extended leave from police work. Those are the places that "Homicide: The Movie" finds some of our favorite detectives during its opening minutes. I know it is early to start beating the drum, with the NBC movie not airing until Sunday, Feb. 13, but the screening cassette arrived one recent morning and, of course, I put the rest of the day on hold and raced to the VCR to see what executive producer Tom Fontana and his colleagues have done with the "Homicide" crew since last we met in May. Is it worth marking your calendar?
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
It seems like old times in the Fells Point police precinct, which is bustling with activity as the actors laugh, reminisce and, on cue, turn on the intensity."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.