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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
First, the Army told Frank Olson's sons that the Fort Detrick scientist's death in a fall from a 13th-floor window of a New York hotel had been an accident. Then a presidential commission revealed that the CIA had given an unwitting Olson LSD as part of a mind-control experiment in remote Western Maryland only nine days before the fall, and concluded that his death had been a drug-related suicide. Now Eric and Nils Olson believe their father - a bioweapons expert who had told colleagues before he died that he wanted to quit the top-secret Special Operations Division - was murdered.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
First, the Army told Frank Olson's sons that the Fort Detrick scientist's death in a fall from a 13th-floor window of a New York hotel had been an accident. Then a presidential commission revealed that the CIA had given an unwitting Olson LSD as part of a mind-control experiment in remote Western Maryland only nine days before the fall, and concluded that his death had been a drug-related suicide. Now Eric and Nils Olson believe their father - a bioweapons expert who had told colleagues before he died that he wanted to quit the top-secret Special Operations Division - was murdered.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2002
FREDERICK -- It was here in the Olson family back yard in 1975 that the world first learned the name of a man who, the story went, had been unwittingly drugged with LSD by the Central Intelligence Agency 22 years earlier and then jumped to his death from a 10th-floor hotel room. The Olsons -- among them Eric, the oldest child -- called a news conference. Reporters from throughout the country came to the house that Frank Olson had built and gathered around the picnic table to listen. Reporters heard that family patriarch Frank Olson, ostensibly an Army scientist, had committed suicide in 1953.
TOPIC
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
He was 9 years old when his mother woke him before dawn half a century ago in Cold War America. Eric Olson came blinking into the living room of their Frederick home, where his father's boss and friend, Col. Vincent Ruwet, sat with the family doctor. "Everybody had this stony-faced expression," Olson recalls. "I remember Ruwet saying, `Your father was in New York and he had an accident. He either fell out the window or jumped.'" After decades of dogged inquiry, Eric Olson now has a new verb for what happened to his father, Frank Olson, who worked for the Army's top-secret Special Operations Division at Fort Detrick, where he developed bioweapons and experimented with mind-control drugs.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 3, 1994
FREDERICK -- Whether biological-warfare researcher Frank R. Olson's death from a 13-story fall in New York City 40 years ago was suicide or murder is a tantalizing question that, some say, never has been satisfactorily answered.But sons of the late Frederick biochemist, whose top-secret work involved both the U.S. Army, which was his employer, and the CIA, hope to put the issue to rest by having a team of forensic scientists examine their father's body.As the first step, his remains were exhumed yesterday from a hillside grave in Linden Hills Cemetery overlooking Frederick.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick Jr., 77, a former top CIA official, died Friday from complications of pneumonia at his home in Middleburg, Va. He entered the intelligence services when he enlisted in the Army in 1942, when he was on the editorial staff of U.S. News and World Report. He joined the CIA at its inception in 1947, eventually becoming its inspector general and then executive director, which at that time was the third-ranking position. He left in 1965 to teach at Brown University. As inspector general, he had the job of investigating some internal agency actions that were criticized years later -- among them the 1953 death of Frank Olson, an Army biochemist who died while using LSD in an agency experiment.
TOPIC
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
He was 9 years old when his mother woke him before dawn half a century ago in Cold War America. Eric Olson came blinking into the living room of their Frederick home, where his father's boss and friend, Col. Vincent Ruwet, sat with the family doctor. "Everybody had this stony-faced expression," Olson recalls. "I remember Ruwet saying, `Your father was in New York and he had an accident. He either fell out the window or jumped.'" After decades of dogged inquiry, Eric Olson now has a new verb for what happened to his father, Frank Olson, who worked for the Army's top-secret Special Operations Division at Fort Detrick, where he developed bioweapons and experimented with mind-control drugs.
NEWS
June 18, 2003
On Monday, June 16, 2003 FLORENCE MERMELSTEIN (nee Olson) beloved wife of David H. Mermelstein; loving mother of Ilona M. Robinson; dear mother-in-law of Larry D. Robinson; devoted sister of the late Frank Olson; cherished grandmother of Leonard B. Robinson, Denise and Scott A. Robinson and Michelle L. Robinson; adored great-grandmother of Justin B. Robinson, JakeRoss Robinson, Brandon D. Robinson, Marissa B. Robinson and Amanda J. Robinson; beloved aunt...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melody Holmes | January 6, 2000
Choral tribute to King On Sunday, the Choral Arts Society of Washington will present its 12th annual choral tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Kennedy Center. Featured acts include the Children's Chorus of Washington, The BET (Black Entertainment Television) Urban Nation Hip Hop Choir and the Church of God in Christ Combined Choirs. There also will be a free lecture before the concert, featuring civil rights activist, singer and storyteller Jack Landron. The lecture begins at 6:15 p.m., the concert at 7:30 p.m. The Kennedy Center is off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A team of forensic scientists yesterday left open the possibility of homicide in the 1953 death of a Frederick researcher whose psyche was damaged by LSD in a secret government experiment.Reporting on a six-month investigation, the team that examined the remains of Frank R. Olson could not say conclusively whether he was slain or committed suicide after unwittingly taking the mind-altering drug in a CIA-run test.But neither possibility can be excluded, said James E. Starrs, the team leader and a professor of law and forensic science at George Washington University.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2002
FREDERICK -- It was here in the Olson family back yard in 1975 that the world first learned the name of a man who, the story went, had been unwittingly drugged with LSD by the Central Intelligence Agency 22 years earlier and then jumped to his death from a 10th-floor hotel room. The Olsons -- among them Eric, the oldest child -- called a news conference. Reporters from throughout the country came to the house that Frank Olson had built and gathered around the picnic table to listen. Reporters heard that family patriarch Frank Olson, ostensibly an Army scientist, had committed suicide in 1953.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick Jr., 77, a former top CIA official, died Friday from complications of pneumonia at his home in Middleburg, Va. He entered the intelligence services when he enlisted in the Army in 1942, when he was on the editorial staff of U.S. News and World Report. He joined the CIA at its inception in 1947, eventually becoming its inspector general and then executive director, which at that time was the third-ranking position. He left in 1965 to teach at Brown University. As inspector general, he had the job of investigating some internal agency actions that were criticized years later -- among them the 1953 death of Frank Olson, an Army biochemist who died while using LSD in an agency experiment.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 3, 1994
FREDERICK -- Whether biological-warfare researcher Frank R. Olson's death from a 13-story fall in New York City 40 years ago was suicide or murder is a tantalizing question that, some say, never has been satisfactorily answered.But sons of the late Frederick biochemist, whose top-secret work involved both the U.S. Army, which was his employer, and the CIA, hope to put the issue to rest by having a team of forensic scientists examine their father's body.As the first step, his remains were exhumed yesterday from a hillside grave in Linden Hills Cemetery overlooking Frederick.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
Forensic scientists examining the exhumed body of the Frederick germ warfare researcher who died more than 40 years ago days after unwittingly taking LSD in a CIA experiment say they have found skull fractures that could point to homicide rather than the official verdict of suicide.Frank R. Olson, a civilian researcher at the Army's Fort Detrick, died in a fall from a New York hotel window.Investigators at George Washington University are making a copy of Mr. Olson's skull to study a number of fractures missed by the first autopsy and to determine whether they are consistent with the original coroner's ruling that his death was a suicide.
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