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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
With long-term repair work on the Jones Falls Expressway underway, and major funding for the Red Line coming, Baltimore is in the midst of and building up to a large amount of transportation work — all with an eye toward better connectivity and reliability for city commuters. The JFX work also means headaches, and the Red Line has plenty of critics, some of who say it is misconceived and leaves out too many residents. There are other challenges facing the city's transportation system, including a high number of accidents involving pedestrians and the ever-present issue of congestion during large-scale events downtown.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
About 10,000 gamblers, well-connected guests and curious local residents are expected to come to the city a week from tonight for the grand opening of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, launching what city officials hope will be a powerful economic engine. The debut will be a test for city officials and business leaders, who face a stack of logistical hurdles in the casino's first week. Opening night of Maryland's fifth and most urban casino overlaps with an Orioles game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards . There are six more home games the first week - including on Saturday, when the Navy football team also will be in town to play Ohio State at M&T Bank Stadium.
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NEWS
March 7, 2004
Bon Secours Spiritual Center in Marriottsville will offer these healing programs which are open to the community: Spring Directed Retreat with Martha Campbell, Justine Cyr and Joan Fronc from 5 p.m. March 16 (supper at 6 p.m.) to 3 p.m. March 21. The cost is $300 by check or credit card. This retreat focuses on spring's new beginnings. Daily meetings with a spiritual director, enjoyment of the campus, time for personal prayer and reflection, and Eucharist will be available. Taize Prayer Around the Cross with Mary Ann Mulzet at 7:30 p.m. March 18. The cost is a donation.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
As Alice Ross rumbled across Hanover Street's Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge early on the morning of Baltimore's most recent snowstorm, her Subaru smashed into a large pothole obscured by the accumulating snow. The 61-year-old Halethorpe resident, on her way to drive a friend to a medical appointment, instead continued directly to her car dealership in Glen Burnie, she said - where she was met with a $1,100 mechanic's bill. "I was petrified," Ross said of the incident, which nearly sent her off the bridge.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
In a recent story about new speed camera tests, Frank Murphy, Baltimore's deputy transportation director for operations, addressed the camera network's error rate by stating "I'm not really concerned what the error rate is, we just want to reduce it" ("New speed camera tests," Dec. 1). I think perhaps it's time for city officials to be concerned about the error rate; instead of just reducing it, how about instead getting it down to zero? An investigation by The Sun found that the city continued to operate a camera on Cold Spring Lane months after learning it had issued incorrect speed readings.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The closure of Light Street didn't heavily disrupt the flow of baseball fans to Camden Yards on Tuesday night for the Orioles' first home game since a burst water main shut the street section last week, fans and officials said. Whether that will remain true for the team's next five games — which are all at home, and on busier days of the week — wasn't clear. Fans from around the region who were streaming into the stadium just before the 7:05 p.m. start to the Orioles' game against the Tampa Bay Rays reported no problems getting into town, whether they came in from the north or south, via car or public transportation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Warning: Congestion ahead. Starting next Friday evening, one lane in each direction of the Jones Falls Expressway near 29th Street will be shut down for up to a month while crews make emergency repairs to clogged and collapsed drainage pipes. The work, which could cost up to $1 million, will reduce traffic flow by at least a third and is expected to have a major impact on commuters, city transportation officials said. Motorists are being urged to map alternate routes or take light rail until the work is completed.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Baltimore police officials said Thursday the department is doubling to 25 the number of officers available to review speed camera tickets — one of several moves intended to help prevent the issuance of erroneous citations, which has cast a cloud over the city's program in recent months. Meanwhile, city transportation officials said Baltimore's new speed camera vendor, Brekford Corp. of Hanover, has delivered some new cameras and is scheduled to replace all 83 of the city's existing cameras by late March, about a month sooner than anticipated.
NEWS
September 11, 1999
Memories of Bishop MurphyFor half a century it was my privilege to know Philip Francis Murphy, who died Sept. 2 ("Bishop Murphy, advocate for justice, dies at age 66," Sept. 3) after 40 years as a priest and 23 years as auxiliary bishop of Baltimore.If Christ was the winning face of God, Bishop Murphy was the beguiling face of Catholicism -- a structured religion whose officials too often seem cold and legalistic.We first met in our teens as fellow students at St. Charles Minor Seminary in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1997
All summer long, rain or shine, they walked the streets and counted the signs.Stop. Yield. One Way. Playground. Speed Limit. Bus Stop. Every last one, duly noted by 12 squads of eight Baltimore teen-agers working in the city's youth summer jobs program.On their last day of work Friday, the Northeast Baltimore squad, seven boys and one girl, went through their final paces on 33rd Street and Greenmount Avenue, showing how quickly they noted the number, type and condition of the signs they passed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Local commuters and Ravens fans should get ready for major gridlock near the city's gridiron. Transportation officials are warning of heavy traffic congestion in South Baltimore - and bracing for its spread into the downtown area - as lane closures and other changes take effect near the site of the Horseshoe Casino rising on busy Russell Street south of M&T Bank Stadium. Football fans will be caught in the mix, despite efforts to minimize work during stadium events, city and Ravens officials said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
With long-term repair work on the Jones Falls Expressway underway, and major funding for the Red Line coming, Baltimore is in the midst of and building up to a large amount of transportation work — all with an eye toward better connectivity and reliability for city commuters. The JFX work also means headaches, and the Red Line has plenty of critics, some of who say it is misconceived and leaves out too many residents. There are other challenges facing the city's transportation system, including a high number of accidents involving pedestrians and the ever-present issue of congestion during large-scale events downtown.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Members of Baltimore's legislative delegation in Annapolis chastised city transportation officials Friday for problems with the city's lucrative network of speed cameras. Del. Brian McHale called it "unjust" that the city won't try to identify, and refund, every erroneous ticket issued. Del. Curt Anderson said he thought existing state law barred the city from paying its contractor a share of each $40 fine, a view shared by Gov. Martin O'Malley. And a skeptical Del. Nathaniel Oaks asked city officials what they'll do after finding that a motorist paid a ticket that shouldn't have been issued.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Baltimore police officials said Thursday the department is doubling to 25 the number of officers available to review speed camera tickets — one of several moves intended to help prevent the issuance of erroneous citations, which has cast a cloud over the city's program in recent months. Meanwhile, city transportation officials said Baltimore's new speed camera vendor, Brekford Corp. of Hanover, has delivered some new cameras and is scheduled to replace all 83 of the city's existing cameras by late March, about a month sooner than anticipated.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
In a recent story about new speed camera tests, Frank Murphy, Baltimore's deputy transportation director for operations, addressed the camera network's error rate by stating "I'm not really concerned what the error rate is, we just want to reduce it" ("New speed camera tests," Dec. 1). I think perhaps it's time for city officials to be concerned about the error rate; instead of just reducing it, how about instead getting it down to zero? An investigation by The Sun found that the city continued to operate a camera on Cold Spring Lane months after learning it had issued incorrect speed readings.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
City officials said Friday that they no longer have complete confidence in the accuracy of their speed cameras' radar systems and have instituted a new "reasonableness" test on two cameras known to have issued erroneous tickets. "We now know we can't just rely on radar being 100 percent accurate," said Frank Murphy, the city's deputy transportation director for operations. "It is incumbent upon us as the operator to make sure what's being issued is accurate. " Murphy's comments came after a Baltimore Sun investigation showed that a series of vehicles received speed camera tickets at two cameras along Cold Spring Lane even though the cameras' own pictures proved the vehicles were traveling too slowly to warrant the tickets.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Chances are many Baltimore commuters will spend the weekend poring over maps, checking out city byways and back streets, and dreaming of something that may not exist come Monday morning's rush hour: a clear shot into downtown. The Jones Falls Expressway as we know it disappeared Friday evening, with one lane closed in each direction near 29th Street by barrels and barriers, and marked with flashing signs and arrows. It may stay that way for up to two months while crews conduct emergency repairs to damaged drainage pipes and bolster the highway's underpinnings.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
As Alice Ross rumbled across Hanover Street's Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge early on the morning of Baltimore's most recent snowstorm, her Subaru smashed into a large pothole obscured by the accumulating snow. The 61-year-old Halethorpe resident, on her way to drive a friend to a medical appointment, instead continued directly to her car dealership in Glen Burnie, she said - where she was met with a $1,100 mechanic's bill. "I was petrified," Ross said of the incident, which nearly sent her off the bridge.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The closure of Light Street didn't heavily disrupt the flow of baseball fans to Camden Yards on Tuesday night for the Orioles' first home game since a burst water main shut the street section last week, fans and officials said. Whether that will remain true for the team's next five games — which are all at home, and on busier days of the week — wasn't clear. Fans from around the region who were streaming into the stadium just before the 7:05 p.m. start to the Orioles' game against the Tampa Bay Rays reported no problems getting into town, whether they came in from the north or south, via car or public transportation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Chances are many Baltimore commuters will spend the weekend poring over maps, checking out city byways and back streets, and dreaming of something that may not exist come Monday morning's rush hour: a clear shot into downtown. The Jones Falls Expressway as we know it disappeared Friday evening, with one lane closed in each direction near 29th Street by barrels and barriers, and marked with flashing signs and arrows. It may stay that way for up to two months while crews conduct emergency repairs to damaged drainage pipes and bolster the highway's underpinnings.
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