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NEWS
February 3, 2010
As always, Robert Embry has a full grasp of the barriers that prevent those with expertise to teach in our classrooms ("Maryland must remove barriers to attracting quality teachers," Feb. 1). Pay is certainly a reason, but more importantly the requirement of certain courses in order to be certified. Fifty years ago when I came to Maryland to teach, my salary was frozen because I lacked a "methods" course, even though my transcript showed a course of "principles and practices" of my discipline.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
On a country lane in Howard County, the letterbox for Cathy and Steve Klein sits directly at the driveway's edge for easy mail delivery right off the carrier's truck. Its position is similar to others along the way, but the difference is that the Kleins' driveway is nine-tenths of a mile long, ambling past a deserted antebellum stone house and a barn, flanked by corn fields and fallow fields. By the time a visitor begins to wonder how a snow blower makes it up the narrow incline in winter, two chunky stone posts topped with concrete urns full of flowers herald the approach to the Klein home.
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NEWS
By Barbara MacAdam and Barbara MacAdam,Los Angeles Times | October 4, 1992
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT:A BIOGRAPHY.Meryle Secrest.Knopf.634 pages. $30. Frank Lloyd Wright's life was the great American novel: epic melodrama alleviated by comic relief. Just when it appeared that Wright's career was finished (he was called the best architect of the 19th century) and his life a shambles (he'd left his job, wife and six children in 1909 with no prospects), he resumed action and steered a new course as turbulent and inventive as the last.There are even recurrent motifs, especially fire.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
In this house of variegated Butler stone and stained pine, the eye is constantly drawn beyond each room's floor-to-ceiling windows and out among the trees and sky. The effect evokes the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, and with good reason. It was designed and built in the mid-1960s by architect — and Wright protege — Robert Fryer. His wife, Dr. Adele Fryer, lived there with him from 1980 until his death in 1995. In 2000, she married William Gammon, a certified financial planner with Ameriprise.
TRAVEL
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
A monthly series about weekend escapes for $500 or less. Tucked away in the mountains of Western Pennsylvania are two houses that the modern homeowner might not want to live in, but hundreds a day want to see. They are two of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright's designs: Fallingwater and the lesser-known Kentuck Knob. The houses have no basements, attics or garages because Wright said such things encourage clutter. And the kitchens seem like afterthoughts, probably because Wright didn't cook.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 23, 2004
First, Louis Kahn. Now, Frank Lloyd Wright? A theater company in Amherst, N.Y., is mounting a musical about Wright, one of America's most famous architects. Renewing Wright will debut at the MusicalFare Theater in suburban Buffalo on March 4, less than six months after the debut of My Architect, a full-length motion picture about Kahn, one of Wright's contemporaries. The musical tells the story of Wright's 32-year friendship with Buffalo businessman Darwin Martin, whose years of financial support played a pivotal role in saving Wright's career.
TRAVEL
By Ellen Uzelac and By Ellen Uzelac,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2000
As any Frank Lloyd Wright fan knows, two extraordinary works by America's favorite architect inhabit our region: Fallingwater in western Pennsylvania and the Pope-Leighey House in Alexandria, Va. But somehow a lot of us miss Kentuck Knob, the relatively undiscovered Wright residence and museum in the mountains just minutes from Fallingwater, Wright's masterpiece. I have followed Wright's trail for years -- this spring adding Taliesin West and Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium in Arizona to my FLW map. But to uncover a gem like this one that's so close to home?
NEWS
By Bennard B. Pearlman and Bennard B. Pearlman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 2000
Frank Lloyd Wright, America's pioneering 20th-century architect, was sometimes more interested by design than engineering when it came to producing buildings. There was, for example, the flippant remark he made to a client who called to complain that a leak in the roof of his new Wright-designed house was dripping onto the dining room table. The reply: Move the table. Wright, who died in 1959, might have been more concerned by the fate of his residential masterpiece, the home known as Fallingwater.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 10, 1998
At the start of "Frank Lloyd Wright," filmmaker Ken Burns' PBS biography of America's most famous architect, you will hear Wright talking about Beethoven. Listen closely."My father taught me that a symphony was an edifice of sound," Wright says in an interview recorded before his death in 1959. "And I learned pretty soon that it was built by the same kind of mind in much the same way that a building was built. I used to sit and listen to Beethoven. He was a great architect. The two minds are quite similar because they arrange and build, plot and plan in very much the same way."
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | March 3, 1991
The house definitely has the Wright stuff. The materials -- stone, stucco and shingle -- the low-slung, overlapping roof lines, the expanses of glass and the almost Japanese purity of the design bespeak the influence of the nation's premier architect, Frank Lloyd Wright.But the house, nestled at the edge of several acres of Baltimore County woods, also has the right stuff. Elegant architecture is all very well, but a house has to serve the needs of those who will live in it. And this house was developed with the collaboration of the clients, a pair of articulate professionals with a young son, who had very specific ideas about what they wanted and needed in a residence.
NEWS
February 3, 2010
As always, Robert Embry has a full grasp of the barriers that prevent those with expertise to teach in our classrooms ("Maryland must remove barriers to attracting quality teachers," Feb. 1). Pay is certainly a reason, but more importantly the requirement of certain courses in order to be certified. Fifty years ago when I came to Maryland to teach, my salary was frozen because I lacked a "methods" course, even though my transcript showed a course of "principles and practices" of my discipline.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | April 6, 2008
The Vanderbilt mansion known as the Breakers in Newport, R.I., is one of the architectural treasures featured in "Wright Way New England: Newport to New Hampshire." Offered by the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust, the June 18-21 tour also targets Victorian and modern architecture in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood; Frank Lloyd Wright's Zimmerman House in Manchester, N.H.; and a 1938 house in Lincoln, Mass., designed by Walter Gropius. The $1,895 fee covers three nights' lodging, several meals, entrance fees and motor-coach transportation during the tour.
NEWS
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,Los Angeles Times | August 26, 2007
Loving Frank Nancy Horan Ballantine Books / 384 pages / $23.95 If the true events on which Loving Frank is based were as well known as the Wizard of Oz story, Nancy Horan's novel would be its Wicked - the retelling of a tale about a villainess who is really a heroine following the dictates of her heart at any cost. Like Gregory Maguire's story about L. Frank Baum's character the Wicked Witch of the West, Loving Frank argues that the issue is not good versus evil but true morality versus conformism - though real evil does make a dramatic appearance.
FEATURES
By CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB and CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 6, 2006
HIGH POINT, N.C. -- Furniture manufacturers are betting we're so fed up with technology and mass-produced goods that we will want to put our money on the Simple Life. This yearning for a vanishing lifestyle has nothing to do with Nicole Richie and Paris Hilton. It has everything to do with the Arts & Crafts Movement that made Gustav Stickley, Frank Lloyd Wright and Greene & Greene household names. The most repeated mantra at the International Home Furnishings Market that ended here Wednesday was the simple lines and fine craftsmanship of Arts & Crafts and Mission furniture.
TRAVEL
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
A monthly series about weekend escapes for $500 or less. Tucked away in the mountains of Western Pennsylvania are two houses that the modern homeowner might not want to live in, but hundreds a day want to see. They are two of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright's designs: Fallingwater and the lesser-known Kentuck Knob. The houses have no basements, attics or garages because Wright said such things encourage clutter. And the kitchens seem like afterthoughts, probably because Wright didn't cook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | October 24, 2004
NEW YORK - Frank Lloyd Wright is known as an autocratic genius of the suburbs. Nature was his partner. His villas crouch against the contours of the land, stratifying like geological formations. He assumed that people would approach his creations by car, and he extended the trajectory of travel into his horizontal designs. But a new exhibit at the Skyscraper Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright: The Vertical Dimension, argues he was also an urban soul, and ached to build into the air. "One of my missions is to counter the perception that Wright was utterly uninterested in the city," says Hilary Ballon, the architectural historian and Columbia University professor who curated the exhibit.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | March 31, 1996
Ludd Spivey was delighted when the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright agreed to design the structures on the campus of Florida Southern College. But his mood changed soon after they were built.As the college president sat in his office, he began to feel drips of water. Horrified, he looked up and saw the skylight was leaking all over his desk. Spivey tried to get it fixed, but the annoying drip, drip, drip continued. Losing his patience, he picked up the phone and called Wright."The skylight keeps leaking and I have water all over my desk," Spivey said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | March 14, 1999
It's not every day that a structure designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright makes its debut. MIt's even more unusual when a Wright building gets torn down. MBut by next Sunday, both those events may have occurred in Pittsburgh, as part of a private group's resurrection of a never-built masterwork by one of America's best-known architects nearly 40 years after his death on April 9, 1959.The Pittsburgh area has long been associated with one Wright masterpiece -- Fallingwater, a vacation home designed in 1935 for department store magnate Edgar J. Kaufmann and his family, and finished three years later at nearby Bear Run, Pa.But Wright designed a second Pittsburgh residence for the Kaufmanns nearly 20 years later: an apartment that would have occupied the top level of a 10-story residential tower called Point View designed to perch on a cliff overlooking the Pittsburgh skyline.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 23, 2004
First, Louis Kahn. Now, Frank Lloyd Wright? A theater company in Amherst, N.Y., is mounting a musical about Wright, one of America's most famous architects. Renewing Wright will debut at the MusicalFare Theater in suburban Buffalo on March 4, less than six months after the debut of My Architect, a full-length motion picture about Kahn, one of Wright's contemporaries. The musical tells the story of Wright's 32-year friendship with Buffalo businessman Darwin Martin, whose years of financial support played a pivotal role in saving Wright's career.
BUSINESS
By James Auer and James Auer,MILWAUKEE SENTINEL JOURNAL | December 29, 2002
SPRING GREEN, Wis. -- The great house known as Taliesin floats above the Iowa County countryside like a Prairie-style dream palace. Viewed from the highway below, Taliesin, the home, school and testament of architectural giant Frank Lloyd Wright, is a shimmering vision of gently sloping roofs and neatly arrayed windows, fanciful chimneys and winding walkways, integrated into a soaring, tree-dappled hill. In the view of some historians, Taliesin, begun in 1911, is the crowning achievement of Wright's Prairie period.
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