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Frank Gehry

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NEWS
March 5, 2014
I have recently been made aware of plans for Symphony Woods that deeply disturb me ( "Inner Arbor plans 'wow' Howard Co. design panel," Feb. 27). I remember Symphony Woods as a wooded site that was selected to be Columbia's Town Center Park. In 1965 Jim Rouse and his planners hired my firm to design the Music Pavilion for the Washington National Symphony. The walk through the woods to the pavilion site inspired my design. Now I understand the proposed Inner Arbor plan, which ignores Jim Rouse's original vision, will scatter out-of-scale "attractions" instead of creating a beautiful park around the pavilion.
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NEWS
March 18, 2014
I was one of the original planners of Columbia, moving from California to Baltimore in 1965 to work with Bill Finley, Mort Hoppenfeld, Bob Tennenbaum and a small group of planners on the soon to be developed New Town. I was hired by Jim Rouse shortly after the master plan had been approved by Howard County and, with Frank Gehry (then of Gehry, Walsh and O'Malley) Gerry Cope and others planned the Merriweather Post Pavilion , Columbia's lakefront and early neighborhoods. I've recently moved back to Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Forty years after Frank Gehry completed a series of buildings in the then-fledgling "new town" of Columbia, the current master developer wants him to come back and design more. The Dallas-based Howard Hughes Corp., which in 2010 took over as lead developer of Columbia's town center, invited the acclaimed architect to spend a day touring the town as part of its effort to spur development around the Merriweather Post concert pavilion and the lakefront. On Thursday, Gehry - who has created such buildings as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles - returned for the first time in more than two decades to take a whirlwind tour, learn how his local designs are holding up, and see what future role he might play in the town created by the Rouse Co. The California-based architect, 83, said he has not visited Columbia since the early 1990s - before company founder James Rouse died of Lou Gehrig's Disease and Rouse executive Michael Spear died in a plane crash.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
The debate over the future of Symphony Woods is back on center stage - thanks, in large part, to a letter by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Gehry, whose firm designed Merriweather Post Pavilion and the former Rouse Co. building on the Columbia lakefront, told the Baltimore Sun in a letter to the editor last week that the Inner Arbor plans "deeply disturb me" and that those plans were not in keeping with Columbia founder Jim Rouse's original vision...
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Thank you to Frank Gehry, who joins the hundreds of us who have provided constructive input to the Columbia Association Board of Directors regarding the "improvement" of Symphony Woods, a parkland adjacent to the Columbia Mall and owned by the Columbia Association, i.e. owned by all annual CA charge payers ( "Frank Gehry: Inner Arbor plans 'deeply disturb me,'" March 5). Two years ago Cy Paumier, an internationally known and respected peer colleague of James Rouse, submitted a plan for Symphony Woods that was decisively approved by the Columbia Association Board of Directors as well as the Howard County Planning Board.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
I can not agree more regarding Herman Belz opinion on Frank Gehry's design for theDwight D. EisenhowerMemorial ("Unworthy of Ike," June 11). Mr. Gehry's awareness is slight and lacks aesthetic depth. Certain character fundamentals of President Eisenhower's life should capture our imagination and the memory in principle. A structure, sculpture or monument in the public domain becomes a record of the person we knew in life, his accomplishment and legacy. The emphasis here should be his movement of energy, mass and miracle, bravado and willingness in the face of a better tomorrow for mankind.
FEATURES
By Herbert Muschamp and Herbert Muschamp,New York Times News Service | May 3, 1994
Christian de Portzamparc, architect of the City of Music conservatory in Paris and a number of apartment buildings there, has been awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize for 1994, it was announced Sunday by the Hyatt Foundation, sponsors of the award.Mr. Portzamparc, who is 49 and lives in Paris, is the first French architect to receive the Pritzker Prize, widely considered xTC architecture's most prestigious. Born in Morocco in 1944, he is also the first Pritzker laureate of the generation that grew up after World War II.Unusually, for an internationally prominent architect of his age, Mr. Portzamparc is better known for buildings than for theoretical or unbuilt projects.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
The debate over the future of Symphony Woods is back on center stage - thanks, in large part, to a letter by renowned architect Frank Gehry. Gehry, whose firm designed Merriweather Post Pavilion and the former Rouse Co. building on the Columbia lakefront, told the Baltimore Sun in a letter to the editor last week that the Inner Arbor plans "deeply disturb me" and that those plans were not in keeping with Columbia founder Jim Rouse's original vision...
NEWS
March 18, 2014
I was one of the original planners of Columbia, moving from California to Baltimore in 1965 to work with Bill Finley, Mort Hoppenfeld, Bob Tennenbaum and a small group of planners on the soon to be developed New Town. I was hired by Jim Rouse shortly after the master plan had been approved by Howard County and, with Frank Gehry (then of Gehry, Walsh and O'Malley) Gerry Cope and others planned the Merriweather Post Pavilion , Columbia's lakefront and early neighborhoods. I've recently moved back to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Fans of architect Frank O. Gehry can take in four of his early works in downtown Columbia, but they'd better hurry. Two of the four are headed for demolition. Howard County officials hope to knock down a Gehry-designed firehouse to build a larger facility. The Rouse Co. intends to replace the architect's Exhibit Center with another building. The plans have upset preservationists, who say the 35-year-old buildings have historic and architectural significance. "When you have a couple of buildings in the county that were designed by the undisputed pre-eminent architect living in the world today, I think it should be saved and put to another use," said Del. Elizabeth Bobo, who lives in Columbia.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Thank you to Frank Gehry, who joins the hundreds of us who have provided constructive input to the Columbia Association Board of Directors regarding the "improvement" of Symphony Woods, a parkland adjacent to the Columbia Mall and owned by the Columbia Association, i.e. owned by all annual CA charge payers ( "Frank Gehry: Inner Arbor plans 'deeply disturb me,'" March 5). Two years ago Cy Paumier, an internationally known and respected peer colleague of James Rouse, submitted a plan for Symphony Woods that was decisively approved by the Columbia Association Board of Directors as well as the Howard County Planning Board.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
I have recently been made aware of plans for Symphony Woods that deeply disturb me ( "Inner Arbor plans 'wow' Howard Co. design panel," Feb. 27). I remember Symphony Woods as a wooded site that was selected to be Columbia's Town Center Park. In 1965 Jim Rouse and his planners hired my firm to design the Music Pavilion for the Washington National Symphony. The walk through the woods to the pavilion site inspired my design. Now I understand the proposed Inner Arbor plan, which ignores Jim Rouse's original vision, will scatter out-of-scale "attractions" instead of creating a beautiful park around the pavilion.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Forty years after Frank Gehry completed a series of buildings in the fledgling "new town" of Columbia, the current master developer wants him to come back and design more. The Dallas-based Howard Hughes Corp., which in 2010 took over as lead developer of Columbia's town center, invited the acclaimed architect to spend a day touring the town as part of its effort to spur development around the Merriweather Post concert pavilion and the lakefront. On Thursday, Gehry — who has created such buildings as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles — returned for the first time in more than two decades to take a whirlwind tour, learn how his local designs are holding up, and see what future role he might play in the town created by the Rouse Co. The California-based architect, 83, said he has not visited Columbia since the early 1990s — before company founder James Rouse died of Lou Gehrig's disease and Rouse executive Michael Spear died in a plane crash.
NEWS
By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Developer James W. Rousewas a pioneer at recycling other people's buildings for new uses, including Faneuil Hall in Boston and parts of the South Street Seaport historic district in Manhattan. Now one of the most prominent buildings he constructed from scratch - the former Rouse Co. headquarters in Columbia - is about to get a similar treatment from a successor to Rouse's firm. The Howard Hughes Corp. of Dallas, which succeeded Rouse and General Growth Properties as the master developer of Columbia, has a $20 million plan to convert the former Rouse headquarters on Little Patuxent Parkway from a single-occupant office building to a mixed-use, multitenant development with a 41,000 square-foot Whole Foods Market as the anchor.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
I can not agree more regarding Herman Belz opinion on Frank Gehry's design for theDwight D. EisenhowerMemorial ("Unworthy of Ike," June 11). Mr. Gehry's awareness is slight and lacks aesthetic depth. Certain character fundamentals of President Eisenhower's life should capture our imagination and the memory in principle. A structure, sculpture or monument in the public domain becomes a record of the person we knew in life, his accomplishment and legacy. The emphasis here should be his movement of energy, mass and miracle, bravado and willingness in the face of a better tomorrow for mankind.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
ELCIEGO, SPAIN / / The theatrical, floor-to-ceiling, merlot-colored drapes at the Marques de Riscal would suit a production of Hedda Gabler or Hamlet. But this is not a tragedy. This is a guestroom at the first and only hotel designed by Frank Gehry. When the curtains part at the push of a button, you see a picture window with angular contours, erratically tilted panes and a zigzagging window seat. The undercarriage of the roof, wrapped in pink, gold and silver titanium ribbons, is visible in the foreground, and in the distance lies the sleepy stone village of Elciego, surrounded by soldierly vineyards of northern Spain's Rioja wine country.
NEWS
By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Developer James W. Rousewas a pioneer at recycling other people's buildings for new uses, including Faneuil Hall in Boston and parts of the South Street Seaport historic district in Manhattan. Now one of the most prominent buildings he constructed from scratch - the former Rouse Co. headquarters in Columbia - is about to get a similar treatment from a successor to Rouse's firm. The Howard Hughes Corp. of Dallas, which succeeded Rouse and General Growth Properties as the master developer of Columbia, has a $20 million plan to convert the former Rouse headquarters on Little Patuxent Parkway from a single-occupant office building to a mixed-use, multitenant development with a 41,000 square-foot Whole Foods Market as the anchor.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 4, 2004
There are two schools of thought about museum design in America today. One is that a museum should be a passive container for the art collection on display inside. The second is that a museum should be an integral part of the collection - perhaps even its most important work. A new exhibit about the museums designed by architect and artist Frank O. Gehry shows why his buildings consistently fall into the second category - and why Gehry has received worldwide acclaim for creating them.
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