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By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
On NPR , Frank Deford talks about Bud Selig's decision to add an extra wild card team to each league this season , and the effect it's having on the postseason chances for several teams, including the Orioles . Deford makes note of something that I've heard a lot recently on sports talk programs around the area -- the Orioles are somehow 10 games over .500 even though they have been outscored by a large margin and they're among the league's...
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Through its partnership with the Friends of Jaclyn Foundation, the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team recently adopted, or "signed," Marquise Long, a dynamic 5-year-old boy with a smile that lights up a room. The foundation pairs children battling pediatric brain tumors with college and high school sports teams. The teams give these children and their families love, support and friendship as they fight the disease. Since its founding in 2005, the foundation has connected hundreds of teams with children throughout the United States and Canada.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
NPR sports commentator Frank Deford threw propriety to the wind Wednesday morning in favor of hometown pride and loyalty, admitting on air that he was rooting -- hard -- for the Orioles. Deford, who grew up in North Baltimore, first explained that when it comes to sports teams, folks need to dance with the one that brung ya. "My first protocol in rooting in sports is you should stick with the teams you grew up with," he said. "Continuing to cheer for your original hometown teams is one way of displaying the old-fashioned value of allegiance.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
NPR sports commentator Frank Deford threw propriety to the wind Wednesday morning in favor of hometown pride and loyalty, admitting on air that he was rooting -- hard -- for the Orioles. Deford, who grew up in North Baltimore, first explained that when it comes to sports teams, folks need to dance with the one that brung ya. "My first protocol in rooting in sports is you should stick with the teams you grew up with," he said. "Continuing to cheer for your original hometown teams is one way of displaying the old-fashioned value of allegiance.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli | April 19, 2012
Though he's long since moved away, award-winning sports writer and Baltimore native Frank Deford feels the same way about the Orioles and owner Peter Angelos as someone who never left.   “He was great at asbestos,” Deford, a Gilman graduate, said. “He's not so great at baseball.”   During an interview given Wednesday afternoon after Deford spoke to a group of students at Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills, the author and Sports Illustrated mainstay -- his work also appears on NPR and HBO -- said the team's fortunes have clearly transformed since Angelos took over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
A couple of celebrity stop-overs created quite a stir, and raised a few bucks, for a couple of worthy Charm City causes. Rita Moreno was this year's guest star at the "Annual GEDCO Senator Theatre Classic," which raises money for Govans Ecumenical Development Corporation. GEDCO executive director Julie Pierson says the vivacious 71-year-old singer / dancer / actress made a point of visiting every table at the dinner, graciously posing for photos and signing autographs. "She was a real delight," Julie says.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
Frank Deford is outraged. This time, though, he's exercised not over the churlish behavior of some tennis prodigy or yet another act of self-destruction by baseball owners. As he turns onto Gittings Avenue in north Baltimore, Deford spots where Bauer's, the venerable florist, once stood - and what blossoms in its place. "Oh, my God, I can't believe it. This is awful," cries the legendary Sports Illustrated writer. "Oh, I can't believe it." Where the hump of a greenhouse stood for 100 years, there is now a collection of faux-Tudor style houses, each as unimaginative as the next.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Sun Staff | September 26, 2002
Frank Deford has lived in Connecticut for nearly 30 years, but that doesn't mean he has forgotten his Baltimore roots. In fact, the acclaimed writer, who grew up in North Baltimore and graduated from Gilman, used the city circa 1954 as the setting for his new novel, An American Summer. And this weekend, Deford returns to Charm City as one of the featured authors at the Baltimore Book Festival. The seventh annual festival takes place at Mount Vernon Place tomorrow from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. In addition to the appearance of Deford and other nationally known authors such as Diane Rehm, Connie Briscoe and Walter Dean Myers, the festival also includes literary workshops, poetry readings, cookbook demonstrations, children's activities, live music, walking tours and more than 150 exhibitors and booksellers.
NEWS
November 5, 1995
"Among Schoolchildren" by Tracy Kidder. It's about the difference a good teacher can make in a child's life, indeed, in society. A fellow teacher gave it to me. I'm also reading "Passing Shots" by Pam Shriver and Frank DeFord and Dick Francis' "Decider." My aunt gave it to me. There are interesting parallels to the racetrack situation now in Maryland. It's a great book.-- Gerry Brewster, new teacher at Chesapeake High School, Eastern Baltimore County
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
On NPR , Frank Deford talks about Bud Selig's decision to add an extra wild card team to each league this season , and the effect it's having on the postseason chances for several teams, including the Orioles . Deford makes note of something that I've heard a lot recently on sports talk programs around the area -- the Orioles are somehow 10 games over .500 even though they have been outscored by a large margin and they're among the league's...
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli | April 19, 2012
Though he's long since moved away, award-winning sports writer and Baltimore native Frank Deford feels the same way about the Orioles and owner Peter Angelos as someone who never left.   “He was great at asbestos,” Deford, a Gilman graduate, said. “He's not so great at baseball.”   During an interview given Wednesday afternoon after Deford spoke to a group of students at Garrison Forest School in Owings Mills, the author and Sports Illustrated mainstay -- his work also appears on NPR and HBO -- said the team's fortunes have clearly transformed since Angelos took over.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs wears a T-shirt that tells the Steel City exactly how he feels about its football team. Pittsburgh wide receiver Hines Ward spits the words "pure hatred" in reference to Baltimore. If this week's one-upmanship between the players left any doubt, several of this city's iconic sports figures said that the Ravens- Steelers rivalry — which has its next act Saturday at 4:30 in the AFC divisional playoff — burns with more intensity than any they've known.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
The ballroom glittered Wednesday night, and it had little do with the sparkling silver tennis balls in the table centerpieces at the Sheraton Inner Harbor. The sparkle came from the tennis royalty assembled for the evening to honor Pam Shriver and her charity event the Tennis Challenge, which was retired after 25 years. Billie Jean King, Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert, Elise Burgin and Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra - the newest area tennis star, who made a major impact at this fall's U.S. Open - were all here for the tribute to Shriver.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 11, 2007
Heard back from Frank Deford the other day, responding to my column about his Smithsonian magazine piece on Charm City. You may recall that Deford had lamented the lack of white luminaries in the Baltimore of his youth: "It is both ironic and instructive that in the first half of the 20th century, the two most illustrious Americans to come from Baltimore were Thurgood Marshall and Billie Holiday - African-Americans who rose up out of a segregated society;...
NEWS
November 29, 1992
Louise McAdams Deford, a former secretary at the Calvert School and mother of sports columnist Frank Deford, died yesterday in her apartment in Roland Park Place after suffering complications from emphysema. She was 80.Services for Mrs. Deford, a city resident since 1936, will be held at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow . at the Church of the Redeemer chapel at North Charles St. and Melrose Avenue.After rearing three sons, Mrs. Deford embarked on a second career when she learned how to type and began working as a secretary at their alma mater, the Calvert School, in 1961.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Through its partnership with the Friends of Jaclyn Foundation, the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team recently adopted, or "signed," Marquise Long, a dynamic 5-year-old boy with a smile that lights up a room. The foundation pairs children battling pediatric brain tumors with college and high school sports teams. The teams give these children and their families love, support and friendship as they fight the disease. Since its founding in 2005, the foundation has connected hundreds of teams with children throughout the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Alexis Sweeney and Jessica Dzaman and Alexis Sweeney and Jessica Dzaman,Special to baltimoresun.com | August 29, 2005
There's a certain pride in opening a book where the action takes place in a recognizable setting. Reading about favorite watering holes, familiar streets and neighborhoods we call home is like sharing a special secret with the author. Here are a few books that are thick with references to many things that are uniquely Baltimore. (For a list of Baltimore authors who don't always set their tales in Charm City, see Based in Baltimore.) "The Accidental Tourist" Anne Tyler 329 pages, 1985 Pick up any Anne Tyler book and you'll find a tattered Baltimore neighborhood, a parade of eccentrics and some serious emotional calisthenics.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | August 19, 2005
LIKE JUST ABOUT everyone else in this business, I've always held Sports Illustrated's Frank Deford in the highest regard. However, after viewing You Write Better Than You Play: The Best of Frank Deford, which debuts tonight at 8 on ESPN Classic, I admire him all the more. During the 90-minute program, highlighting his career and some of his best stories, there is this comment from Chris Evert, recalling when he once was writing a piece on her: "At one point, I tried to pick him up." (Evert says she was unsuccessful.
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