Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFrank Cashen
IN THE NEWS

Frank Cashen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 30, 2007
Frank Cashen once had five World Series rings. "I gave them all away. I have five sons," he said the other day from his house near Easton. These days, he enjoys his oysters -- and loves oyster stew. And, he says, "My wife Jean makes the best crab cakes on the Eastern Shore." Cashen, 81, who grew up in Gardenville and was a News American sportswriter and National Brewing Co. executive, was the Orioles executive vice president and general manager during a 10-year stint with the club that began in 1965.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When first base coach Wayne Kirby asked Jonathan Schoop to clear his locker Saturday, he hoped it would help the second baseman snap out of his struggles at the plate. So Schoop carried his belongings out of Camden Yards and then turned around and brought everything back in, pretending like he had just gotten called up from the minor leagues. “I was trying to refresh my mind,” Schoop said. “I was coming in like my season was just starting out. Tried to refresh, you never know.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Frank Cashen, the Orioles executive who oversaw the team's halcyon years - when it traded for Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, hired Earl Weaver as manager and won two world championships - died Monday at 88. A Baltimore native, Cashen died of complications from congestive heart failure surrounded by family members at Easton Memorial Hospital in Talbot County. Cashen led the Orioles for a decade (1966-75), during which they also won four American League pennants and two division championships.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Frank Cashen, the Orioles executive who oversaw the team's halcyon years - when it traded for Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, hired Earl Weaver as manager and won two world championships - died Monday at 88. A Baltimore native, Cashen died of complications from congestive heart failure surrounded by family members at Easton Memorial Hospital in Talbot County. Cashen led the Orioles for a decade (1966-75), during which they also won four American League pennants and two division championships.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
It became as much a part of the mosaic of Orioles baseball as Esskay hot dogs, the collective roar of "O!" during the National Anthem, and Rex Barney intoning "Thank yewww" and "Give that fan a contract!"If you went to an O's game, you expected to jump to your feet during the seventh-inning stretch and hear John Denver warbling "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" in that high-pitched, hillbilly twang.Since the first time he danced and sang "Country Boy" atop the Orioles dugout during Game 1 of the 1983 World Series at Memorial Stadium, Orioles fans have felt affection for the 53-year-old pop singer, who died in a plane crash Sunday.
SPORTS
August 2, 2006
Do you fault the Orioles for not making a trade Monday? Trading one of the top hitters in the game like Tejada for what was offered would have been ridiculous. Trading disgruntled Javy Lopez for a bag of baseballs and a player to be named later would have been brilliant. Jim Kirby Columbia No fault for not acquiring Oswalt, who would be gone by the 2008 season. Fault lies in the O's weak rookie drafts. Fault the O's farm system for the team's shallow assets to trade. Bill Piccirilli Lutherville No. 1 fault Jerry Hoffberger, Frank Cashen and Hank Peters for not leaving any notes behind on how to upgrade the team through trades.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | October 3, 1994
If the Baltimore Orioles absolutely want the best available manager in baseball, all they need do, after looking the field over, is sign Dave Johnson. He's endowed with all the required qualifications -- a remarkable understanding of the game, inherent intelligence and strong leadership. He also has a hard and fast record as a winner everywhere he has been.Combine this with exceptional skills as a communicator and the Orioles, if they take him, will be making a decision that can't help but be in their best interests.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 23, 1992
NEW YORK -- Every phase of Frank Cashen's life, personal and professional, was represented. A kaleidoscope combining the past and present. A galaxy of family and friends, gathered for no other reason than to engage in a torrent of enjoyment. He only needed to scan the faces in the room and it was as if he had pressed a button to activate his book of memories.Even a cowboy singer, Gene Autry, rode in from the West to bthere and a famous song and dance man, Donald O'Connor, let && it be known how pleased he was to have been included.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Emotion filled the voice of a sentimental leprechaun -- John Francis Cashen, by name -- as he came to the microphone. The city of New York was honoring one of its favored adopted sons, a man who resuscitated the New York Mets. Family, friends and associates were present, making for a glorious occasion.Jerry Hoffberger, who had hired Cashen to help run the Baltimore Raceway harness track in 1960 and ultimately named him general manager of the Baltimore Orioles, was on the dais.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 23, 1994
There are no expressions of regret from John Schuerholz when asked about the coveted opportunities he passed over to take on other baseball obligations, preferring instead to remain as general manager of the Atlanta Braves. The Baltimore Orioles contacted him this time a year ago about becoming their chief executive and, only weeks ago, the Chicago Cubs made an extraordinary offer.Tempted? Perhaps. Yet his allegiance to Atlanta overrode any desire to change addresses and inherit new responsibilities, even if Baltimore would have meant coming home to be with family and friends.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 30, 2007
Frank Cashen once had five World Series rings. "I gave them all away. I have five sons," he said the other day from his house near Easton. These days, he enjoys his oysters -- and loves oyster stew. And, he says, "My wife Jean makes the best crab cakes on the Eastern Shore." Cashen, 81, who grew up in Gardenville and was a News American sportswriter and National Brewing Co. executive, was the Orioles executive vice president and general manager during a 10-year stint with the club that began in 1965.
SPORTS
August 2, 2006
Do you fault the Orioles for not making a trade Monday? Trading one of the top hitters in the game like Tejada for what was offered would have been ridiculous. Trading disgruntled Javy Lopez for a bag of baseballs and a player to be named later would have been brilliant. Jim Kirby Columbia No fault for not acquiring Oswalt, who would be gone by the 2008 season. Fault lies in the O's weak rookie drafts. Fault the O's farm system for the team's shallow assets to trade. Bill Piccirilli Lutherville No. 1 fault Jerry Hoffberger, Frank Cashen and Hank Peters for not leaving any notes behind on how to upgrade the team through trades.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
It became as much a part of the mosaic of Orioles baseball as Esskay hot dogs, the collective roar of "O!" during the National Anthem, and Rex Barney intoning "Thank yewww" and "Give that fan a contract!"If you went to an O's game, you expected to jump to your feet during the seventh-inning stretch and hear John Denver warbling "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" in that high-pitched, hillbilly twang.Since the first time he danced and sang "Country Boy" atop the Orioles dugout during Game 1 of the 1983 World Series at Memorial Stadium, Orioles fans have felt affection for the 53-year-old pop singer, who died in a plane crash Sunday.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | October 3, 1994
If the Baltimore Orioles absolutely want the best available manager in baseball, all they need do, after looking the field over, is sign Dave Johnson. He's endowed with all the required qualifications -- a remarkable understanding of the game, inherent intelligence and strong leadership. He also has a hard and fast record as a winner everywhere he has been.Combine this with exceptional skills as a communicator and the Orioles, if they take him, will be making a decision that can't help but be in their best interests.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | September 23, 1994
There are no expressions of regret from John Schuerholz when asked about the coveted opportunities he passed over to take on other baseball obligations, preferring instead to remain as general manager of the Atlanta Braves. The Baltimore Orioles contacted him this time a year ago about becoming their chief executive and, only weeks ago, the Chicago Cubs made an extraordinary offer.Tempted? Perhaps. Yet his allegiance to Atlanta overrode any desire to change addresses and inherit new responsibilities, even if Baltimore would have meant coming home to be with family and friends.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 23, 1992
NEW YORK -- Every phase of Frank Cashen's life, personal and professional, was represented. A kaleidoscope combining the past and present. A galaxy of family and friends, gathered for no other reason than to engage in a torrent of enjoyment. He only needed to scan the faces in the room and it was as if he had pressed a button to activate his book of memories.Even a cowboy singer, Gene Autry, rode in from the West to bthere and a famous song and dance man, Donald O'Connor, let && it be known how pleased he was to have been included.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When first base coach Wayne Kirby asked Jonathan Schoop to clear his locker Saturday, he hoped it would help the second baseman snap out of his struggles at the plate. So Schoop carried his belongings out of Camden Yards and then turned around and brought everything back in, pretending like he had just gotten called up from the minor leagues. “I was trying to refresh my mind,” Schoop said. “I was coming in like my season was just starting out. Tried to refresh, you never know.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 21, 1991
CLEVELAND -- Remember the horror stories everybody used to tell about the defensive shortcomings of rookie third baseman Leo Gomez? Remember the error-ridden entrance he made last year, when he made enough misplays in his first two major-league games to last a month? Well, forget all that.Gomez has worked long and hard to fill the hole in his game, and the hard work is paying off. He entered last night's series opener against the Cleveland Indians with just one error in his past 70 games.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 2, 1992
Baseball's best manager, without even a semblance o discussion or debate, is Dave Johnson. And he doesn't have a job. A sad commentary and certainly a sorry indictment in an endeavor where teams supposedly are trying to win. That a man of his extraordinary skills remains among the unemployed is an embarrassment to a business that prefers to call itself a sport.Johnson has intelligence and credibility. He doesn't deal in a two-faced manner with players. They are kept aware of what's expected but, at the same time, not dunned.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | May 20, 1992
The 24-Hour Sportsline has been flooded with so many "Q's" and comments that I am having trouble keeping up with them.Don't get me wrong, sports fans. I really appreciate all the great calls you have swamped me with, because that is the purpose of the Sportsline.* Won't it be a devastating loss to county and high school baseball if Jack Kramp carries out his plans to resign as umpire-in-chief and scheduler of the Anne Arundel Umpires Association by June 15?Has there ever been a more efficient and dedicated man in that position than Kramp, who apparently is having problems with a few malcontents within his ranks?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.