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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
It was 42 years ago this week that the Franciscan Center opened its doors to anyone who needed a coat, a lunch or a sympathetic ear. The door at 101 W. 23rd St. remains open to all, although the emergency outreach services offered at this way station of help are being fine-tuned to meet the needs of its clients. Earlier this year, Edward F. McNally, an attorney and former Roman Catholic priest, became the center's executive director. He is part of the new administration team charged with guiding the center through a difficult economic time when many more clients are seeking emergency help.
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NEWS
November 14, 2013
The recent obituary for Sister Irene Marshiano ( "Sister Irene Marshiano, founder of the Franciscan Center, dies at 70," Nov. 13) should have been The Sun's front page lead story. My compliments to Jacques Kelly for his truly superb writing and testament to a very wonderful religious lady's love and faith in God. In these troubled times of evil and despair, such an inspiring true life story should be front page news, not buried with the obituaries. Rick Crane, Essex - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Rev. Edward F. McNally, a Roman Catholic priest who later became executive director of the Franciscan Center, died Saturday of lymphoma at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Mount Washington resident was 46. "Ed had volunteered here when he was a seminarian at St. Mary's. Afterward, he saw an ad in the paper for executive director of the Franciscan Center and applied," said Sister Ellen Carr, former interim director of the center and now a member of its board. "I hired him and felt totally comfortable turning over the reins to him," said Sister Ellen.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Sister Irene Marshiano, a nun who offered sandwiches and coffee "with respect" at the Franciscan Center she founded 45 years ago, died of complications from diabetes Oct. 31 at her order's Clare Court Convent in Northeast Baltimore. She was 70. Born in New York City's Harlem and raised in the Bronx, she was the daughter of a Hertz rental car mechanic and a homemaker. After graduating from St. Helena's High School in the Bronx, she entered a Franciscan convent, but she soon experienced health problems and was asked to leave.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Sister Irene Marshiano, a nun who offered sandwiches and coffee "with respect" at the Franciscan Center she founded 45 years ago, died of complications from diabetes Oct. 31 at her order's Clare Court Convent in Northeast Baltimore. She was 70. Born in New York City's Harlem and raised in the Bronx, she was the daughter of a Hertz rental car mechanic and a homemaker. After graduating from St. Helena's High School in the Bronx, she entered a Franciscan convent, but she soon experienced health problems and was asked to leave.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2009
Salary: $25,000 Age: 61 Years on the job: 7 How he got started: Bob Longo first became associated with the Franciscan Center in the early 1990s as a volunteer and member of the Secular Franciscan Order, an association within the Roman Catholic Church. He worked as a paralegal supervisor with the Social Security Administration for 33 years, retiring in 2002. After about five weeks of retirement, Longo decided he needed something to keep him busy, so he started to again volunteer at the center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 4, 2011
The Baltimore Sun An out-of-work bridge painter shot a question at Art Donovan, the Baltimore Colts legend making a visit to a city emergency services outreach center Friday morning. "So, when were you inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame?" asked Thurmond Lamar Brown. Donovan, who sat next to his friend and former teammate Jim Mutscheller at the Franciscan Center on West 23rd Street, never missed a beat. "Right after the Civil War," he said. For about two hours, Colts veterans Donovan, Mutscheller, Lenny Moore , Toni Linhart and Doug Eggers helped this 42-year-old social services center get back in the business of serving meals to the city's poor five days a week.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
Mary Lacy Fetting, a retired psychotherapist who counseled the homeless at the Franciscan Center as a volunteer, died of cancer Wednesday at her Guilford home. She was 82. Born Mary Lacy in Baltimore, she was the daughter of James J. Lacy, an iron foundry owner and state comptroller from 1947 to 1950, and the former Rose Daily. She was raised on Oakenshaw Place and Fenchurch Road and was a 1945 Mount Saint Agnes High School graduate. She was the valedictorian and president of her class.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
It's an old tableau on Maryland Avenue.Two lines of people waited in 95-degree heat for clothing and food on a recent morning outside Baltimore's Franciscan Center.The 59 men, women and children represented the variety of people who for years have lined up in heat, cold and rain. Staffers and volunteers help them in crowded quarters that the Franciscan Sisters want to replace with a $2.6 million center."Can you imagine a father bringing his wife and two kids in here and they haven't eaten in two days?
NEWS
August 25, 2008
On July 22, 2008, JOAN E. SINCLAIR; beloved wife of Hugh Sinclair; stepmother of David Sinclair; dear aunt of Ann Cappiello. A memorial service will be held at St. Joseph's Church-Texas, Wednesday, August 27 at 11 a.m. The family suggests contributions in her name to Animal Rescue, Inc., P.O. Box 35, Maryland Line, MD 21105 or The Franciscan Center, 101 W. 23rd Street, Baltimore, MD 21218.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Rev. Edward F. McNally, a Roman Catholic priest who later became executive director of the Franciscan Center, died Saturday of lymphoma at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Mount Washington resident was 46. "Ed had volunteered here when he was a seminarian at St. Mary's. Afterward, he saw an ad in the paper for executive director of the Franciscan Center and applied," said Sister Ellen Carr, former interim director of the center and now a member of its board. "I hired him and felt totally comfortable turning over the reins to him," said Sister Ellen.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 19, 2011
Pasquale "Pat" Panaggio, a World War II veteran who worked for the state Department of Human Resources for more than two decades, died Sunday of cancer at his Towson home. He was 89. The son of a shoemaker and a homemaker, Mr. Pasquale was born and raised in Providence, R.I., where he graduated in 1940 from Rogers High School. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942 and completed pre-flight training. He later served in the Pacific Theater with the 20thf Air Force as a radio operator and gunner aboard B-17 Flying Fortresses and participated in the Battle of Okinawa.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
Mary Lacy Fetting, a retired psychotherapist who counseled the homeless at the Franciscan Center as a volunteer, died of cancer Wednesday at her Guilford home. She was 82. Born Mary Lacy in Baltimore, she was the daughter of James J. Lacy, an iron foundry owner and state comptroller from 1947 to 1950, and the former Rose Daily. She was raised on Oakenshaw Place and Fenchurch Road and was a 1945 Mount Saint Agnes High School graduate. She was the valedictorian and president of her class.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 4, 2011
The Baltimore Sun An out-of-work bridge painter shot a question at Art Donovan, the Baltimore Colts legend making a visit to a city emergency services outreach center Friday morning. "So, when were you inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame?" asked Thurmond Lamar Brown. Donovan, who sat next to his friend and former teammate Jim Mutscheller at the Franciscan Center on West 23rd Street, never missed a beat. "Right after the Civil War," he said. For about two hours, Colts veterans Donovan, Mutscheller, Lenny Moore , Toni Linhart and Doug Eggers helped this 42-year-old social services center get back in the business of serving meals to the city's poor five days a week.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
It was 42 years ago this week that the Franciscan Center opened its doors to anyone who needed a coat, a lunch or a sympathetic ear. The door at 101 W. 23rd St. remains open to all, although the emergency outreach services offered at this way station of help are being fine-tuned to meet the needs of its clients. Earlier this year, Edward F. McNally, an attorney and former Roman Catholic priest, became the center's executive director. He is part of the new administration team charged with guiding the center through a difficult economic time when many more clients are seeking emergency help.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 1, 2010
Cora Barnes has a deep respect for the upbringing she received at the Baltimore orphanage she knew throughout her youth. She learned her algebra and Roman Catholic Latin hymns. She sang at midnight Masses and said her prayers. She also never forgot the love and friendships formed at the little-known institution. And now, nearly eight decades after she arrived at the orphanage, she returns weekly to its brick buildings set between Maryland Avenue and Howard Street. For the past 17 years, she has been a volunteer at what is now the Franciscan Center, where she sorts women's clothes and works actively with the poor and homeless.
NEWS
December 28, 1998
During the holidays, most Americans are worried about over-consumption -- too much food, gifts, drink -- not the problem of not having enough.At the Franciscan Center, having too little is a constant issue as volunteers and staff labor to help poor people get life's necessities -- a warm winter coat for a child, a pair of work boots for a newly employed laborer or a hot lunch for a family with no utilities at home.This fall, the Franciscan Center celebrated its 30th anniversary and opened the $3.4 million day center at 101 W. 23rd St. The center more than doubled its space by moving from two nearby rowhouses and the Francis House convent.
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