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Francis Scott Key

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | February 17, 2012
An article in The Baltimore Sun  by Chris Kaltenbach recounts how documents from 1917 on the musical arrangement of "The Star-Spangled Banner" came to be donated to Fort McHenry.   The tune to which Francis Scott Key's poem (originally titled "Defence of Fort McHenry") is that of "To Anacreon in Heaven. " Anacreon, the Greek lyric poet, was the patron of The Anacreontic Club of eighteenth-century London, which celebrated food and drink. The melody is attributed to the British musicologist and composer John Stafford Smith.  But it is probably not the text of   "To Anacreon in Heaven"*  that buzzed in Key's head as he wrote his verses, but a different set of words, "Adams and Liberty,"  a patriotic text by Robert Treat Paine also set to Smith's tune:  YE sons of Columbia, who bravely have fought,          For those rights, which unstained from your Sires had descended,      May you long taste the blessings your valour has brought,          And your sons reap the soil which their fathers defended.                          'Mid the reign of mild Peace,                          May your nation increase,      With the glory of Rome, and the wisdom of Greece;          And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves,          While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls its waves.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 30, 2014
  Catherine Sweeney scored the game's only goal as unranked Catonsville stunned visiting No. 8 Hereford, 1-0, in field hockey Monday. Vanessa Tracy recorded 20 saves for the Comets, whose record improved to 6-1. The Bulls fell to 7-2. No. 7 Century 4, Francis Scott Key 0: Maddie Dickman scored two goals and Mandie Trostle and Shelby Mercer each added one to lift the Knights (6-1-1) over the visiting Eagles from Carroll County. Marissa Donoghue had three assists for Century.
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EXPLORE
November 10, 2012
Members of the Francis Scott Key High School field hockey team embraced the mission of October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month and hosted events and fundraisers to increase awareness and raise money for cancer research. According to field hockey coach Danielle Unflat, the team collected donations at school-related sporting events - both home and away - collected change during lunches and accepted other donations online and in-person. Part of the month included a "challenge" from the school's girls soccer team - which was also raising money through a special "Kick Cancer" event.
NEWS
September 21, 2014
I read with interest Roy Valiant's letter ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept 18). As someone who routinely shouts, "O!" when the song is performed at Orioles games, I'd like to offer a different perspective. I won't dwell on how ironic it is that a song associated with independence has become the focus of so many "authorities" laying down the law about how it must be sung. Instead, I'd like to point out that Francis Scott Key did not write a hymn or a dirge or a prayer. He wrote and published a poem - a poem that became so popular that someone eventually set it to music.
NEWS
By Katie Jones, katievjones@aim.com | May 6, 2013
As a high school head wrestling coach for 34 years and a high school and college wrestler before that, it isn't hard to pin down Bill Hyson when it comes to talking about the sport. "Wrestling is an unique ...sport," said Hyson, a coach and teacher at Francis Scott Key High School. "In wrestling, you're putting it all out there on the mat. " The sport that places strict demands on an athlete on and off the mat, especially in terms of diet and conditioning, has been part of Hyson's life since he arrived at the school in Union Bridge in the early 1970s.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | January 25, 2013
Jimmy Carter was the newly-inaugurated President and Reggie Jackson had yet to take a swing with the New York Yankees when the Francis Scott Key boys' basketball team last made an appearance in the state semifinals. The Eagles have seen plenty of lean years since 1977. The program's last winning season came in 2000-01, when the Eagles finished at 15-10. Francis Scott Key will break that 12-year drought this year, but the goals reach much further. After opening with losses to Oakdale and Westminster, Coach Ryan Kimble's club defeated traditional county powers Winters Mill South Carroll, and Century in a six-day span to start the New Year.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
For Katelyn Goodhart and Winters Mill, Thursday was a banner night. Literally. "We were practicing in [our] gym, and we looked at the banners," Goodhart said. "We noticed that none of them said anything about volleyball. " Later this year, there will be one that does. The No. 6 Falcons (10-0) used some timely serving and a bend-but-not-break defense to defeat host and 10th-ranked Francis Scott Key (11-1), 25-22, 25-16, 25-22. The win gives Winters Mill its first ever Carroll County volleyball title, putting the team on a banner in the school's gym. "Katelyn really gave us a lift with her serving.
SPORTS
By Chuck Acquisto and Chuck Acquisto,Contributing Writer | December 30, 1992
The holidays have brought few on-court gifts for Francis Scott Key's girls varsity basketball team. Because of Monday's bad weather, the struggling Eagles have practiced just once in the last week, and in yesterday's first-round game of the second annual Central Maryland Basketball Tournament at Atholton, coach Brian Hollingsworth's 1-4 team faced defending champion Damascus of Montgomery County.Unfortunately for Hollingsworth and his Eagles, there was no exchange counter to switch tournament pairings.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 1999
BEFORE THEY RUN off for the summer and begin their lives beyond high school, the following graduating seniors from Francis Scott Key High School deserve a standing ovation for a job well done.At recent senior awards and graduation ceremonies, these students received recognition for outstanding work from the community, area businesses and Key's academic departments. The students and their awards were:Jill Baker, U.S. Marine Corps Semper Fi; Jason Barbour, Farmer's & Mechanics Bank Business Career Award; Eric Billings, Grove Worldwide Corp.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
Their starting center was out with the flu, a number of others were not feeling well and one of their starting forwards played with a possible broken thumb.2 Seven different players scored for the Rebels.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was hospitalized Saturday night after complaining of shortness of breath at the Star-Spangled Spectacular festiivities at Ft. McHenry. The mayor delivered her remarks at the event, which included the vice president and the British ambassador, before leaving the stage around 8 p.m., mayoral spokesman Kevin Harris said. She was alert and communicating with staffers and family, he said. Harris said Rawlings-Blake would be kept overnight at the hospital for observation; he declined to name the hospital due to privacy concerns.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
More than a million visitors were expected to land in Baltimore this past week to commemorate the bicentennial of the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner," many of them from out of state and in need of a place to stay. Across the city, hotels have pushed deals and patriotic specials, leaned on their staffs to memorize long lists of Star-Spangled Spectacular events, and brushed up on their own place in Baltimore history in an attempt to lure the War of 1812 buffs streaming into town.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Myrtle Sanders was just a month old when she and her mother visited Fort McHenry with thousands of others to form the Human Flag in 1914 - 100 years after the British bombardment of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. On Tuesday, the 100-year-old Lochearn resident was back, along with 6,600 schoolchildren, teachers and others from across Maryland to form the Star-Spangled Banner Living Flag, a visual kickoff for the seven-day Star-Spangled Spectacular festival commemorating the national anthem's bicentennial.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
As we prepare for the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore next week, a decent respect for historical accuracy demands attention to a few details.  They are drawn from Steve Vogel's well-researched and eminently readable Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation  (Random House, 534 pages, $30).  Admiral Alexander Cochrane, anchored about two miles down the bay from Fort McHenry, ordered the bombardment to begin at 6:30 a.m. on Tuesday, September 13, 1814.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Francis Scott Key is so closely identified with Fort McHenry that the South Baltimore landmark is considered the go-to place to learn how the 15-starred American flag that flew after the fort's bombardment 200 years ago inspired him to write the poem that became the national anthem. But those wishing to pay their final respects to the lawyer-turned-poet could also head 50 miles west to Frederick, where Key is buried in a sprawling cemetery that runs along U.S. 40 where it shares the roadway with busy Interstate 70. "Key always wanted to be buried in the shadow of the Catoctin Mountains," said Ron Pearcey, the superintendent of Mount Olivet Cemetery.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The U.S. Navy's Blue Angels and ships from six foreign countries will be coming to Baltimore in September for the city's Star - Spangled Spectacular celebration, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. As part of the commemoration of the Battle of Baltimore and bombardment of Fort McHenry, former Secretary of State Colin Powell will visit the fort the morning of Sept. 14. He will take part in an early-morning ceremony recalling the moment Francis Scott Key saw a giant flag flying over the fort and was inspired to write the poem that would become "The Star-Spangled Banner.
NEWS
November 24, 1997
Jennifer L. Parrish, a first-year biology major at Albright College in Reading, Pa., was awarded a Jacob Albright Scholar Scholarship for 1997-1998.The scholarships, valued at $40,000 over a four-year period, are offered to students who demonstrate exceptional academic performance throughout high school.The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Parrish of Linwood is a graduate of Francis Scott Key High School.FireTaneytown: Firefighters from Harney, Union Bridge, Emmitsburg in Frederick County, and Kingsdale and Littlestown, Pa., assisted Taneytown at 5: 16 a.m. Thursday, responding to smoke in an apartment on East Baltimore Street.
NEWS
October 1, 1996
Three students from Francis Scott Key High School have been named Commended Students in the 1997 National Merit Scholarship Program.Sarah Amass, Lauren Rupp, and Joy Thomas are among the 35,000 students throughout the nation being honored for their exceptional academic promise. Commended Students placed among the top 5 percent of students entering the Merit Program.These seniors also will be commended by their school.FireNew Windsor: Firefighters responded at 7: 16 p.m. Saturday to an auto fire on High Street.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Ships from six foreign countries and all over the East Coast, plus Texas, will be coming to Baltimore in September for the city's Star-Spangled Spectacular celebration, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday morning. As part of the Battle of Baltimore and bombardment of Fort McHenry commemoration, former Secretary of State Colin Powell will visit the fort the morning of Sept. 14. He will take part in an early-morning ceremony recalling the moment Francis Scott Key saw a giant flag flying over the fort and was inspired to write the poem that would become "The Star-Spangled Banner.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
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