Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFrancis Poulenc
IN THE NEWS

Francis Poulenc

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2006
Gay Shakespeare The lowdown -- Measure for Measure is one of Shakespeare's problem plays, and in its production opening tomorrow, Mobtown Players gives some of those problems a gender-bending modern slant. Director Ryan Whinnem has set the dark comedy in the 1980s and turned Claudio's illicit lover, Juliet, into a man named Julio. In Whinnem's interpretation, the play becomes a commentary on gay-marriage legislation: Claudio is imprisoned not for impregnating his fiancee, but for trying to marry Julio.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
It has been nearly 30 years since Francis Poulenc's haunting opera “Dialogues of the Carmelites” was staged in Baltimore. No telling when or if it might return, so the opportunity offered this weekend by Peabody Opera Theatre should not be passed up. This uneven, but ultimately moving, production marks the third annual collaboration between Peabody Conservatory and the Modell/Lyric Performing Arts Center. The public does not seem to appreciate the value of the venture; attendance each year has been modest, as was the case again Friday night for the first of two performances of “Dialogues.” This valuable partnership deserves to be sustained, not to mention enhanced - increased funding would enable larger, more Lyric-scaled sets, for one thing.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 1997
Among music critics, it is fashionable to decry "Carmina Burana" as vulgar. Well, it is, if we remember that the Latin root of "vulgar" means "of the people.""Carmina," Carl Orff's epic song cycle of medieval poems, has the virtues of immediacy and accessibility, which most composers would kill for. To Orff (1895-1982), who was by profession a music educator, these things came easily, for "Carmina" is constructed of the same building blocks as his Orffschulwerk musical exercises for children, expanded to an orchestral canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
If the string quartet is master of the instrumental chamber music idiom, the woodwind quintet sleeps with the servants. Oh, how the great composers lavished extraordinary care on their string quartets. Franz Joseph Haydn, the inventor of the genre, wrote more than 80 of them. Beethoven gave us 16 that span each period of his artistic life. But works for an ensemble of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and French horn in those two canons with no orchestra or piano to accompany them? Good luck trying to find one. Still, there is a marvelous woodwind quartet repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, Edward Gunts, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod Ollison, Raven Smith, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | November 13, 2008
CLASSICAL MUSIC 'Well-Tempered Clavier' If asked to identify the single most important work of keyboard music, in terms of originality, depth and long-lasting influence, many a scholar would point to the Well-Tempered Clavier by Johann Sebastian Bach. Book I of this brilliant collection of preludes and fugues will be performed in its entirety on the harpsichord by Richard Egarr, who recently became music director of England's top-drawer Academy of Ancient Music. This presentation by the Shriver Hall Concert Series will take place at 3 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
It has been nearly 30 years since Francis Poulenc's haunting opera “Dialogues of the Carmelites” was staged in Baltimore. No telling when or if it might return, so the opportunity offered this weekend by Peabody Opera Theatre should not be passed up. This uneven, but ultimately moving, production marks the third annual collaboration between Peabody Conservatory and the Modell/Lyric Performing Arts Center. The public does not seem to appreciate the value of the venture; attendance each year has been modest, as was the case again Friday night for the first of two performances of “Dialogues.” This valuable partnership deserves to be sustained, not to mention enhanced - increased funding would enable larger, more Lyric-scaled sets, for one thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | April 9, 1998
Theodora Hanslowe, whose friends call her Teddy, returns Tuesday to her alma mater, Peabody Conservatory of Music, for a preview of her New York recital debut.Hanslowe, an award-winning mezzo, made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1994 as Rosina in "The Barber of Seville."For her Weill Recital Hall program later this spring, she has chosen songs by Henry Purcell, Arnold Schoenberg, Francis Poulenc and George Gershwin, and the second cycle of "Liederkreis" to poems of Joseph Eichendorff by Robert Schumann.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, Edward Gunts, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod Ollison, Raven Smith, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | November 13, 2008
CLASSICAL MUSIC 'Well-Tempered Clavier' If asked to identify the single most important work of keyboard music, in terms of originality, depth and long-lasting influence, many a scholar would point to the Well-Tempered Clavier by Johann Sebastian Bach. Book I of this brilliant collection of preludes and fugues will be performed in its entirety on the harpsichord by Richard Egarr, who recently became music director of England's top-drawer Academy of Ancient Music. This presentation by the Shriver Hall Concert Series will take place at 3 p.m. Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2006
Gay Shakespeare The lowdown -- Measure for Measure is one of Shakespeare's problem plays, and in its production opening tomorrow, Mobtown Players gives some of those problems a gender-bending modern slant. Director Ryan Whinnem has set the dark comedy in the 1980s and turned Claudio's illicit lover, Juliet, into a man named Julio. In Whinnem's interpretation, the play becomes a commentary on gay-marriage legislation: Claudio is imprisoned not for impregnating his fiancee, but for trying to marry Julio.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Concert will celebrate 20th-century composers Chamber Music on the Hill will honor composers born near the start of the 20th century at 7 p.m. Sunday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. Part of a series at the college, the concert will feature WMC performers David Duree, Kyle Engler, Linda Kirkpatrick and David Kreider; Julie Gregorian, Esther Mellon-Thompson and Melissa Zaraya, all of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; Evan Walker of Carroll Community College; and area professional musicians Lynn Griffith and Mindy Niles.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
If the string quartet is master of the instrumental chamber music idiom, the woodwind quintet sleeps with the servants. Oh, how the great composers lavished extraordinary care on their string quartets. Franz Joseph Haydn, the inventor of the genre, wrote more than 80 of them. Beethoven gave us 16 that span each period of his artistic life. But works for an ensemble of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and French horn in those two canons with no orchestra or piano to accompany them? Good luck trying to find one. Still, there is a marvelous woodwind quartet repertoire.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 1997
Among music critics, it is fashionable to decry "Carmina Burana" as vulgar. Well, it is, if we remember that the Latin root of "vulgar" means "of the people.""Carmina," Carl Orff's epic song cycle of medieval poems, has the virtues of immediacy and accessibility, which most composers would kill for. To Orff (1895-1982), who was by profession a music educator, these things came easily, for "Carmina" is constructed of the same building blocks as his Orffschulwerk musical exercises for children, expanded to an orchestral canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | October 23, 1997
Choo-San Goh, whose choreographic genius came to an abrupt end in 1987, when he died of AIDS at the age of 39, has not been forgotten. The Washington Ballet, where he was resident choreographer for eight years, maintains the 14 ballets created by the Singaporean artist and next week will bring back three for a benefit performance.Co-sponsored by the Embassy of the Republic of Singapore, the program will include "Double Contrasts," an elegant nocturne in black and white, and "Synonyms," both created in 1978; and the pas de deux from "Momentum," which won an award for choreography at the 1983 International Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2004
Arts The C. Grimaldis Gallery summer show includes Raoul Middleman's Manhattan Bridge, View From the North Tower. page13 Eats Visitors rarely leave Shanty wanting more large portions of fried seafood are the norm. it's worth the groaning. page 14 Stage Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites is no two-penny opera - it's a work of sensitivity, insight and beauty that is a study of the human experience. page 12 Family Farm is the word this weekend as the Harford County Farm Fair runs today through Sunday, and the Carroll County 4-H and FFA Fair begins Saturday and ends Aug. 6. page 27 Scene TV's Batman and two of the actresses who played Catwoman will make an appearance at this weekend's Super Megafest, a celebration for superhero enthusiasts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.