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Franchise Agreement

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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
After more than a year of negotiations, Annapolis officials thought they had reached a franchise agreement with TCI Cablevision.But when the agreement was presented at a public hearing last night, the cable company's representative surprised city officials by telling them that the document was incomplete and unsatisfactory.The representative, William J. Forest, said the document did not reflect the latest changes his company had agreed to at a December meeting."As far as I'm concerned, we were still in a negotiation process," Mr. Forest said.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
Having announced plans to lay almost 2,500 miles of cable throughout Baltimore County, Verizon Communications officials are working to ease fears prompted by severed utility lines during the company's construction in other counties. Verizon wants to install the fiber-optic network so that it will have the technology to eventually offer cable television in the county. During construction in other counties, contractors have accidentally cut utility lines, with the area's dominant cable provider, Comcast, complaining of customer outages.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
The general partner of Mid-Atlantic Cable Television Co. says the company must raise subscription rates if it is to honor its franchise agreement and finish 30 miles of construction in the western and central part of the county.Even if the County Council agrees to such an increase, Mid-Atlantic would not be able to finish the job until one year from when the increase is OK'd, said John C. Norcutt, general partner of Mid-Atlantic. The remaining construction, affecting 520 homes, was to have been finished Dec. 31.Norcutt did not speculate on how much of an increase the company needs.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that the city's pending 12-year franchise agreement with Comcast was the best deal the city could have negotiated, despite his own cable advisory panel's objections to the contract revealed this week. O'Malley said he sought to answer his Cable Communications Advisory Commission's objections by adding amendments to the deal when the Board of Estimates approved the franchise last week. The amendments increase funding available for public access and create a board to oversee such an operation.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
An executive committee of the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission plans to meet today with representatives of Adelphia Communications Corp. in an attempt to resolve long-standing issues - under the threat of a lawsuit by the county group. The meeting was scheduled after the cable commission voted 5-0 last week to take legal action by the end of this month if the members were not satisfied with their progress, said Ken Decker, chairman since 2001 of the eight-member cable commission, which includes the county and seven of its eight incorporated towns (all but Manchester)
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2000
Two technology companies are seeking permission to compete with Comcast Corp. to offer television, Internet and telephone services to Baltimore County residents. Boston-based American Broadband and Starpower Communications of New Jersey filed applications for a franchise agreement by yesterday's deadline. Formed in September, American Broadband is not operating in any city or county, although it has applied to serve about 80 percent of the homes in Rhode Island, said Edward T. Holleran Jr., president of American Broadband.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
Forget about cable television competition in Baltimore County. Viewers have been left with a single, familiar choice for cable -- Comcast -- after a second technology company decided not to invest in new fiber-optic lines. Starpower Communications of Washington formally notified county officials yesterday that it was suspending its application for a franchise agreement that would have let it do battle with the county's monopoly cable provider. "Starpower is very concerned about the potential risks of rapid expansion in today's capital-constrained markets," said company general counsel Deborah M. Royster in a letter to the county.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 15, 2004
A Verizon repairman and union steward asked Baltimore County Council members yesterday to turn down a proposed extension of the county's nonexclusive franchise agreement with Comcast - a deal in which the cable giant has agreed to build the county government a fiber-optic network in exchange for the county giving up a claim on disputed Internet fees. "You're not getting anything for free," said Michael Herdock, a Verizon repairman and Communications Workers of America union steward who attended a council work session with several other union representatives.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2004
For three years, Carroll County's cable commission has been trying to resolve disagreements over unpaid franchise fees and other issues with Adelphia Communications Corp. The commission has had enough. Commission members last week voted to pursue legal action against the cable company for breach of contract. They say Adelphia is refusing to renegotiate its 10-year franchise agreement with the county and allow a technical audit of the cable system. "From the first meeting, we've been trying to get Adelphia to abide by the contract," said Ken Decker, chairman of the Carroll County Cable Regulatory Commission.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
Two years before a 15-year cable television franchise agreement expires, the county's oversight committee is already planning for negotiations with Prestige Cable TV, the Georgia-based company that serves Carroll and seven municipalities.The committee has conducted public hearings on what the community wants from its cable company in the 21st century. But before the committee and Prestige begin discussing franchise renewal, they must reach an agreement on what new and upgraded equipment the company is willing to install before the current franchise agreement expires.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
An executive committee of the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission plans to meet today with representatives of Adelphia Communications Corp. in an attempt to resolve long-standing issues - under the threat of a lawsuit by the county group. The meeting was scheduled after the cable commission voted 5-0 last week to take legal action by the end of this month if the members were not satisfied with their progress, said Ken Decker, chairman since 2001 of the eight-member cable commission, which includes the county and seven of its eight incorporated towns (all but Manchester)
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
Advocates for public access television continued their campaign yesterday to derail the city's pending 12-year franchise deal with cable provider Comcast. At a public hearing before the city's Board of Estimates yesterday, public access TV proponents said the city should demand guaranteed funding for citizen programming before completing the deal. "We call for the Board of Estimates to amend or reject this contract," said Amanda Bowers, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Grassroots Media. "We're really trying to give a voice to citizens."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
The Baltimore County Council voted last night to extend Comcast Corp.'s nonexclusive franchise agreement as part of a deal in which the cable giant will build the county a fiber-optic network in exchange for the county giving up a claim on disputed Internet fees. The council unanimously approved the contract, which will provide the county with a fiber-optic network connecting 14 county sites, including the public safety building, new detention center and the main government complex in Towson.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 15, 2004
A Verizon repairman and union steward asked Baltimore County Council members yesterday to turn down a proposed extension of the county's nonexclusive franchise agreement with Comcast - a deal in which the cable giant has agreed to build the county government a fiber-optic network in exchange for the county giving up a claim on disputed Internet fees. "You're not getting anything for free," said Michael Herdock, a Verizon repairman and Communications Workers of America union steward who attended a council work session with several other union representatives.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2004
After four years of disputes over unpaid franchise fees and customer service complaints with Adelphia Communications Corp., Carroll County's cable commission has reached an agreement with the company on a settlement of nearly $170,000. Adelphia agreed two weeks ago to cut two checks to the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission. One will be for $137,831 -- $122,500 for unpaid fees and audit expenses and $15,331 in accrued interest. The other check will total $31,200 for fines related to customer service complaints that range from lengthy waits on the telephone to missed appointments.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2004
Comcast Cable subscribers in the city would pay $6 more annually under a new 12-year franchise agreement negotiated by Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration and introduced to the City Council last night. Several council members chafed at the added expense of 50 cents per month, which would be used to pay for shows produced by the public, educational institutions and governmental agencies. They said that Comcast should pay for the production costs of such programming. "Comcast is contributing nothing," Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young said.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
The County Council is expected to vote unanimously tonight to extend the franchise agreement with Howard County Television Associates Inc. for 15 years.The cable company, now owned by Comcast Corp., has been serving eastern Howard County under various owners since 1974. The franchise agreement was last renewed in 1986.Renewal does not mean renegotiation. Council members were told in a work session last week that their only function is to approve or reject the franchise agreement and set a time for the next renewal.
NEWS
By Kristina Schurr and Kristina Schurr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 24, 1997
Annapolis and South County residents could be watching town-hall-type discussions and Board of Education and County Council meetings on local cable television, if some members of city council have their way.At a public hearing today, the city council will examine whether to transfer local cable television operation from Tele-Communications Inc. to Jones Intercable Inc.Alderman Carl O. Snowden, a Ward 5 Democrat, said he expects that the council will vote...
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2004
After four years of disputes over unpaid franchise fees and customer service complaints with Adelphia Communications Corp., Carroll County's cable commission has reached an agreement with the company on a settlement of nearly $170,000. Adelphia agreed two weeks ago to cut two checks to the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission. One will be for $137,831 - $122,500 for unpaid fees and audit expenses and $15,331 in accrued interest. The other check will total $31,200 for fines related to customer service complaints that range from lengthy waits on the telephone to missed appointments.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Carroll County's cable commission has reached a tentative settlement with Adelphia Communications Corp. to resolve an ongoing dispute over unpaid franchise fees. Adelphia has agreed to pay $97,500 in additional franchise fees plus interest and another $25,000 to cover a commission-ordered audit that initially found that the nation's fifth-largest cable provider owed more than $200,000 in outstanding fees. "We feel that this is an important sign that Adelphia is willing to deal constructively with the commission," said Ken Decker, chairman of the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission.
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