Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFrances Hodgson Burnett
IN THE NEWS

Frances Hodgson Burnett

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
Think of a young boy dressed in velvet and lace, his hair falling to his shoulders in long, golden curls, the personification of the pampered, effeminate mama's boy: Little Lord Fauntleroy. For one small boy, Fauntleroy was all too real. Vivian Burnett was the real-life model for the popular book written by his mother. In the public eye he was Fauntleroy, and Fauntleroy's fame haunted him to the end of his life. His mother was Frances Hodgson Burnett, the author of such children's classics as "A Little Princess" and "The Secret Garden."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
When she was growing up, Ellen Potter was an avid reader, and nothing thrilled her more than settling down with her well-worn copy of Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic 1911 children's novel, "The Secret Garden. " The book's heroine, 10-year-old Mary Lennox, loses her parents to a cholera outbreak and must start her life anew at a remote manor in rural England. There she meets an array of often-spooky characters, happens on an abandoned garden and brings it back to life. "At the start of that story, Mary's so sour and unlikable.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
When she was growing up, Ellen Potter was an avid reader, and nothing thrilled her more than settling down with her well-worn copy of Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic 1911 children's novel, "The Secret Garden. " The book's heroine, 10-year-old Mary Lennox, loses her parents to a cholera outbreak and must start her life anew at a remote manor in rural England. There she meets an array of often-spooky characters, happens on an abandoned garden and brings it back to life. "At the start of that story, Mary's so sour and unlikable.
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
Think of a young boy dressed in velvet and lace, his hair falling to his shoulders in long, golden curls, the personification of the pampered, effeminate mama's boy: Little Lord Fauntleroy. For one small boy, Fauntleroy was all too real. Vivian Burnett was the real-life model for the popular book written by his mother. In the public eye he was Fauntleroy, and Fauntleroy's fame haunted him to the end of his life. His mother was Frances Hodgson Burnett, the author of such children's classics as "A Little Princess" and "The Secret Garden."
FEATURES
September 30, 1998
"The book I recommend for children is 'Eating Ice Cream with a Werewolf' by Phyllis Green. I liked this book because it is about a boy who has a babysitter he doesn't like. She brought a magic book and they cast all sorts of spells. This is a very funny book."- Mark E. SchifferStevens Forest Elementary"I like the book 'The Secret Garden' because it gives parents one of the ways you can make a spoiled, rotten child into a little angel (if you have a pretty garden). It is recommended for fourth-graders to adults.
FEATURES
October 14, 1998
"I like the 'Arthur' books by Marc Brown. I think these are good books because the main character is very funny. That's why I love the 'Arthur' books."-- Joshua ScottBedford Elementary"I like 'The True Story of the Three Little Pigs' by Jon Scieszka. First, I like the ending. I like when the wolf was in jail. The wolf wanted sugar for his granny's cake. Second, I liked the characters. I liked when the wolf ate the 1st and 2nd pigs. The wolf couldn't sneeze down the third pig's house. This is my favorite fairy tale."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | February 19, 1998
"The Secret Garden" is one of the loveliest books ever written for children, and Oakland Ballet has made a ballet of it that's just as beautiful. The California company will bring its full-length production to the Gordon Center in Owings Mills this weekend.Frances Hodgson Burnett's novel, written in 1911, tells the story of Mary Lennox, a selfish, spoiled girl who is orphaned by a cholera epidemic that kills her parents in India. She is sent to live with a reclusive uncle whose vast estate is on the windy, stormy moors of Yorkshire.
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | March 30, 2008
Fran Durako, a bibliophile and a former chief information officer at a large Washington law firm, owns one of the oldest and largest used-book stores in the city. The Silver Spring resident purchased the Kelmscott Bookshop at 34 West 25th St. in 2003 when its founders, Terry and Don Johanson, decided to get out of the business. The store's 25,000 books range in price from $5 to several thousand dollars. "The Works of Chaucer" / by Geoffrey Chaucer / Kelmscott Press / 554 pages It has beautiful wood engraving and very nice illustrations.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik MOVIES 'Chaplin' | January 9, 1993
TELEVISIONElvis: 'The Untold Story'Elvis lives -- at least in NBC's "Elvis and the Colonel: The Untold Story," at 9 tomorrow night on WMAR (Channel 2). The story is told by an Elvis character who appears at key points in the film to share his Memphis-style remembrance of things past. Mainly what's recounted is Big E's relationship with Col. Tom Parker, the man who managed Presley's career with an iron hand. Beau Bridges is fascinating in a loopy kind of way as Parker. The Elvis stuff is so bad it's good.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 5, 1994
Got plans? If not, make them, because tonight's TV is too bad not to miss.* "The Secret Garden" (11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Channel 13) -- Don't be fooled, or overly excited. This "ABC Kids Movie Matinee" special isn't the recent movie version, or a TV adaptation of the Broadway production. It's a full-length musical cartoon, an animated musical featuring a lot of British talent, most of whom will be more familiar to adults: Derek Jacobi of "I, Claudius," for example, or Honor Blackman, who played Pussy Galore in "Goldfinger."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 17, 1994
Although the streets remain coated with remnants of last week's snow and ice storms, a beautiful garden is in bloom at the Lyric Opera House.The national touring production of Marsha Norman and Lucy Simon's "The Secret Garden" is easily the most lavish, polished show that's come to the Lyric under the aegis of Baltimore's relatively new presenter, Performing Arts Productions.Perhaps the best way to describe this magical musical, which is based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 children's novel, is to use the title of one of its songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
Being alone, whether in outer space or at a boarding school in London, doesn't sound like much fun. But add video games, special effects and dancing and singing, and the entire family might be interested in taking one of two theatrical trips Saturday. Families can escape to Jupiter's fifth moon when they see Imagination Stage's production of Callisto 5 in Bethesda. Or they can stick closer to Earth and attend Children's Playhouse of Maryland's production of A Little Princess at the Community College of Baltimore County, Essex.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.