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NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | May 9, 2007
C'etait genial! When applied to the French presidential election in which conservative Nicolas Sarkozy beat Socialist candidate Segolene Royal by a comfortable margin, it means: That is fantastic! After decades of socialist influence in France, could the French election be a precursor to a Margaret Thatcher-like comeback for conservatives? Perhaps. Though, on foreign policy, Mr. Sarkozy is more pro-American than his predecessor, Jacques Chirac, he is still opposed to the Iraq war and doesn't want to seem too pro-American because most of the French remain firmly anti-American.
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NEWS
By William Pfaff | June 22, 1998
PARIS -- French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin's brief visit to Washington at the end of the week was preceded by the usual flurry of complacent and condescending American appreciations of France's backwardness and of the bad character of the French.This kind of thing has been the thin gruel of American and British appraisals of France since the time of Napoleon, when British mothers warned their children that if they misbehaved, "Boney" would get them. It is interesting chiefly for the persistence of national stereotypes in the popular imaginations of nations.
BUSINESS
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,Los Angeles Times | February 2, 2008
PARIS -- On the first day that nearly everything in France went on sale, employees of the upscale Bon Marche were stationed at the entrances offering cookies to customers as they stormed the glass doors. The shoppers were ravenous - but not so much for sweets. After months of planning, saving and strategizing, they couldn't wait to be set free in the most luxurious department store in France with prices slashed on every rack and in every bin. The same was true later across town in more pedestrian shops on Boulevard St. Denis, where Silvia Atisso and her sister were pawing through racks of winter coats priced at $29.35 each.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 23, 1995
PARIS -- France's new government deported a planeload of illegal immigrants last week, moving quickly to demonstrate that it will take a tough line against illegal entry. But its decision to start expelling large numbers of foreigners has brought loud protests from human rights groups.With recent municipal elections showing a surge of support for the extreme rightist National Front, President Jacques Chirac's government seems eager to be seen addressing the growing fear among many French that Third World immigration is out of hand.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 25, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH and his employees vowed revenge on France for opposing the Iraq war, and now they've meted it out. I'm not talking about banning Jacques Chirac from Bush's ranch in Crawford. That was a favor. I don't mean bypassing France in NATO decisions or possibly stiffing French creditors who lent money to Iraq or avoiding French wines at the White House. Those are mere taunts, trash talk before the coup de grace. I'm not even referring to reports last week that Bush might -- incroyable!
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | January 16, 2008
The reams of news stories on the new French ban on smoking in cafes, restaurants and nightspots have invariably focused on the aura of glamour those little death sticks once conveyed. In newspapers around the globe, nostalgic descriptions of the likes of Coco Chanel or Albert Camus taking a luxurious drag on a cigarette have been, um, de rigueur. But to focus on the diminished allure of the cigarette is to miss the significance of the French banning the most cinematic of sins. No, it's not that the French gave the cigarette - the "little cigar" - its name, or that the plant's active ingredient was named after Jean Nicot, the diplomat who introduced tobacco to the royal court of France in 1559.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 23, 1993
ARLES, France -- Hubert Yonnet breeds bulls and horses on the Camargue's wild marshlands, where the Rhone meets the Mediterranean. Cowboys ride his ranch, birds squawk overhead, and change comes with the cadence of the seasons. But the steady life on the Yonnet ranch is now affected by a turnabout of tastes in this earthy part of southern France.The tradition of bullfighting, which had diminished to a trickle, is coming back with vigor. It has already increased the demand for Yonnet bulls and for several seasons filled this region's arenas with roaring spectators.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | November 11, 2005
As a youth, I daydreamed about fleeing to Paris, as James Baldwin and Josephine Baker had done, to escape the harsh discrimination that limited black opportunities here in America. That's over. In recent years I have met black immigrants who moved to the United States to escape the harsh discrimination that limited their opportunities in Paris. You want to be all that you can be? Try the U.S.A., mon frere, ma cherie. After years of political struggle, hard-won civil rights victories and dozens of urban riots of our own, Americans learned the benefits of opening up opportunities to women and minorities.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 9, 1998
SOMEWHERE today they're remembering Private Kreiner. It's a distant somewhere, a speck of a place in a valley in France. You could speak the name Kreiner there and an old man named Henri Ducret would break into the long story of the Germans and the war, the years of occupation and the day of liberation, and he'll describe the body of Private Kreiner being carried to the churchyard.In the little town of Sauvagney, they remember Private Kreiner.Here in Baltimore, however, we come to the story late, 54 years to the day late.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration suggested yesterday that it saw new room for compromise with France in a lingering standoff that has been the major obstacle to an international agreement on lowering trade barriers.With negotiations on the accord -- under the aegis of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade -- entering a final phase, conciliatory signals from both the United States and France contributed to a new sense of optimism among delegates that a settlement might be reached by a deadline that is now two weeks away.
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