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NEWS
April 5, 2008
On March 31, 2008, GENEVA BARTZ FRANCE; beloved wife of the late Deacon Chester A. France, Sr. and cherished mother of Chester (Yvonne) and Sterling (Evelyn) and the late Craig W. France. Viewing at the JOSEPH L. RUSS FUNERAL HOME P.A., 2222-26 W. North Avenue, on Sunday from 2-6 P.M. Family hour on Monday, at Fulton Baptist Church, 1630 W. North Avenue, from 11 A.M. until 12 noon, when funeral service will begin.
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NEWS
January 31, 2005
On January 30, 2005, CECILIA E. (nee Pryzby); beloved wife of the late Lawrence B. France; devoted mother of Lawrence B. France, III and Joanne Dietrich; loving grandmother of Kim Miller, John Dietrich, Jr., Kelly Gough and Larence B. France, IV. Also survived by eight great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, Wednesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Thursday 9 A.M. in Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
On Wednesday, May 19, 2004, EARL MONROE FRANCE, 92, in Fort Myers, FL under the care of HOpe Hospice. He was born February 23, 1912 in Oella, MD. He was the son of the late Joseph and Laura Ethel (nee Peddicord) France. Earl attended Catonsville High School. He was a commercial photographer of wedding and social occasions. He was an employee of the B & O Railroad and they used many of his photos in the B & O Magazine and the dining car menus. Some of his award-winning photographs were displayed on museum tours including the Smithsonian.
NEWS
December 14, 2003
ANNA VIRGINIA FRANCE, age 89, passed away on Tuesday, December 9, 2003, at Hope Hospice in Ft. Myers Florida. She was born on January 26, 1914, in Bel Air Maryland but she was a long time resident of the Catonsville area. She was the daughter of the late George and Leila (nee Bachtel) Forsythe of Bel Air. Virginia is survived by Earl Monroe France, her loving husband of over 65 years, her daughter, Janice Virginia Friend, of Hornbeck, LA, her granddaughter, Deborah Ellen Brown, of Acworth, GA and two great-grandchildren, JodiAnne and Justin Brown.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | June 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and some of his Pentagon associates appear to be waging a vendetta against France. The Pentagon has not denied, and may even have planted, false rumors that France helped some members of Saddam Hussein's government escape Iraq during the war. More recently, Mr. Rumsfeld has canceled France's routine participation in the Red Flag air combat training exercises, downgraded the two countries' joint appearances in...
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Sometimes I wish that the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council could be chosen like the starting five for the NBA All-Star teams - with a vote by the fans. If so, I would certainly vote France off the council and replace it with India. Then the perm-five would be Russia, China, India, Britain and the United States. That's more like it. Why replace France with India? Because India is the world's biggest democracy, the world's largest Hindu nation and the world's second-largest Muslim nation, and, quite frankly, India is just so much more serious than France these days.
NEWS
December 20, 1994
The refusal of Jacques Delors to run for president of France is a setback for the movement to "widen and deepen" the European Union under German-French leadership. It could leave Germany lonely in its drive to create a European monetary union. It gives aid and comfort to Britain and other outer members of the EU that seek to delay further integration.Mr. Delors is stepping down after 10 years as president of the European Commission in Brussels. He has been the architect, along with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and French President Francois Mitterrand, of European unification.
NEWS
By Steven Hill and Guillaume Serina | April 25, 2007
What if the wrong candidate wins France's presidential election? If the wrong candidate were to win because of electoral fraud - stuffing of ballot boxes or rigging of votes - all of France would be up in arms, and the international media would shine a glaring spotlight. But a different specter hangs over French voters today: that the wrong candidate will win because of an antiquated method for electing their president. The current method, a first-round free-for-all followed by a second round between the top two finishers, is designed for when there are two major candidates who are far ahead of the pack.
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