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By Newsday | April 29, 1996
"Who's handsome? What's gorgeous? Where does sublime reside?"People magazine asks and answers these burning questions in this week's double issue, "The 50 Most Beautiful People in the World, 1996."Mel Gibson and Michelle Pfeiffer both make the list for the fifth time, putting them in a tie with John K. Kennedy Jr. He didn't rate a spot this year in what usually becomes one of People's biggest sellers.People tells us that not everyone was to the camera born. David Duchovny, of TV's "The X Files," says his older brother called him ugly and friends knew him as "Big Nose" and "Big Lips."
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June 7, 2005
In the News Crowe appears to be unwired by broken phone Russell Crowe was arrested for allegedly throwing a telephone at the concierge at the Mercer Hotel in the SoHo section of Manhattan yesterday. Crowe, 41, was arraigned on charges of second-degree assault and fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon - the telephone - before Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Martin Murphy then released on his own recognizance; a court date of Sept. 14 was set. The assault charge is punishable by seven years in prison.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
The best way to be entertained by TV tonight -- after watching "TV Nation" that is -- is to sample several cable movies to catch early roles by actors and actresses who today are a lot more in demand. Tonight's exhibits: Tommy Lee Jones, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Fran Drescher.* "TV Nation" (8-9 p.m., Channel 4) -- It's almost better not knowing what's on this show, because the variety is a constant and pleasant surprise. Suffice it to say that Michael Moore, Merrill Markoe and Ben Hamper are on the road and on the case.
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By Amy Biancolli and Amy Biancolli,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 28, 1998
In "Singin' in the Rain," Stanley Donen's brilliant spoof of old Hollywood, a squeaky-voiced, platinum-shagged silent film goddess named Lina Lamont (played by Jean Hagen) is faced with a terrifying reality: sound.Movies are starting to talk, and she's got a voice that pops light bulbs. "I ceeeeeen't steend 'im!" bleats Lina in her strangled helium soprano, as her voice coach reacts with stoicism and dismay. Gently, she corrects her: "I caaaahn't staaahnd him."Finally, after weeks of struggling, Lina says on screen: "I caaaahhhhn't steend 'im!"
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June 7, 2005
In the News Crowe appears to be unwired by broken phone Russell Crowe was arrested for allegedly throwing a telephone at the concierge at the Mercer Hotel in the SoHo section of Manhattan yesterday. Crowe, 41, was arraigned on charges of second-degree assault and fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon - the telephone - before Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Martin Murphy then released on his own recognizance; a court date of Sept. 14 was set. The assault charge is punishable by seven years in prison.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 7, 1997
Fran Drescher only knows one joke, and she's it: the kvetching Queens queen of stupefying superficiality who possesses an adenoidal accent that could smash atoms and a good heart.Apparently it's enough to sustain her successful half-hour sitcom "The Nanny" but about halfway through hour two of "The Beautician and the Beast" it does begin to feel as strained as Lycra stretched to the detonation point. The setup is TV-lame: As Joy Miller, she's a beauty school (night division) instructor in a far environ of an unnamed New York borough, who gets a blast of publicity when she saves some lab animals during a fire.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 13, 1994
To say that there's nothing worth staying home to see on TV tonight is an understatement. Except for the newsmagazines, it's nearer to the truth to suggest that you ought to leave the house during prime time, just so you don't have to see most of what's being shown. The most watchable alternatives on a very slow night include the following.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Robert Culp guest stars as C.C.'s father, who sort of asks Fran (Fran Drescher) out on a date. Lauren Lane plays C.C. CBS.* "Melrose Place" (9-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
Read no further if you are participating in National TV-Turnoff Week (today through Sunday), sponsored by TV-Free America. But if you can't resist . . .* "Star Trek: Voyager" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- An alien assumes control of the holodeck and begins turning the ship's crew into pure energy. Who can stop him? The ship's doctor (Robert Picardo) who, as merely a holographic image, is not a life form. UPN.* "Melrose Place" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Continuing the clever ploy of repeats reprising the debut appearances of certain characters, Sydney (Laura Leighton)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 3, 1994
Tonight's "Northern Exposure" offers a new twist on a very old tale, while "National Geographic's China" takes a new look at a very old country.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Younger woman "dates" a much older man. It happened in "Indecent Proposal," with Demi Moore being wooed by Robert Redford -- and it happens tonight on "The Nanny," with Fran (Fran Drescher) being wooed by -- ready? -- Efrem Zimbalist Jr. CBS.* "National Geographic's China" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 26)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
Feared in its earliest days as the messenger of death for the movies, television instead became Hollywood's most important partner, and Oscar night represents TV's ultimate tribute. But look for first-time host David Letterman to puncture some of the posturing -- and "Forrest Gump" to collect a few statues.* "Barbara Walters Special" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- In her annual pre-show, the interviewer chats with Michael Douglas, Jim Carrey and Liam Neeson. Hmmm. Couldn't she have found an actress for balance?
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 7, 1997
Fran Drescher only knows one joke, and she's it: the kvetching Queens queen of stupefying superficiality who possesses an adenoidal accent that could smash atoms and a good heart.Apparently it's enough to sustain her successful half-hour sitcom "The Nanny" but about halfway through hour two of "The Beautician and the Beast" it does begin to feel as strained as Lycra stretched to the detonation point. The setup is TV-lame: As Joy Miller, she's a beauty school (night division) instructor in a far environ of an unnamed New York borough, who gets a blast of publicity when she saves some lab animals during a fire.
FEATURES
By Newsday | April 29, 1996
"Who's handsome? What's gorgeous? Where does sublime reside?"People magazine asks and answers these burning questions in this week's double issue, "The 50 Most Beautiful People in the World, 1996."Mel Gibson and Michelle Pfeiffer both make the list for the fifth time, putting them in a tie with John K. Kennedy Jr. He didn't rate a spot this year in what usually becomes one of People's biggest sellers.People tells us that not everyone was to the camera born. David Duchovny, of TV's "The X Files," says his older brother called him ugly and friends knew him as "Big Nose" and "Big Lips."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1996
Get the feeling somebody's looking over your shoulder? You may be right, and that somebody could be a few hundred miles up in the air. Watch the Discovery Channel tonight and learn there's a reason so many of us are paranoid."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
Two oldies return to TV tonight: Roger Moore and "Welcome Back Kotter." The former stars in a TV-movie thriller and the latter joins the cable Nick-at-Nite lineup.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Miss Fine, Miss Fine, wherefore art thou Miss Fine? Fran (Fran Drescher) is cast as Juliet in an off-Broadway "Romeo and Juliet." And the repeat includes a guest star as Romeo: Peter Marc Jacobson, the series' executive producer and Ms. Drescher's real-life husband. CBS.* "The Man Who Wouldn't Die" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Two good geography lessons -- about the American West and Africa's river Nile -- compete on broadcast and cable in a night that also brings back "Columbo."* "The American Experience: The Way West" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, channels 22, 67) -- The first of a two-part series from producer Ric Burns (brother of Ken of "Baseball" and "The Civil War" fame) features a couple of local links: narrator Russell Baker, who grew up in Baltimore and who began his career at The Sun, and Goucher College history professor Julie Jeffrey, who is interviewed for her expertise in the female experience of the old frontier.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
Read no further if you are participating in National TV-Turnoff Week (today through Sunday), sponsored by TV-Free America. But if you can't resist . . .* "Star Trek: Voyager" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- An alien assumes control of the holodeck and begins turning the ship's crew into pure energy. Who can stop him? The ship's doctor (Robert Picardo) who, as merely a holographic image, is not a life form. UPN.* "Melrose Place" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Continuing the clever ploy of repeats reprising the debut appearances of certain characters, Sydney (Laura Leighton)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
Two oldies return to TV tonight: Roger Moore and "Welcome Back Kotter." The former stars in a TV-movie thriller and the latter joins the cable Nick-at-Nite lineup.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Miss Fine, Miss Fine, wherefore art thou Miss Fine? Fran (Fran Drescher) is cast as Juliet in an off-Broadway "Romeo and Juliet." And the repeat includes a guest star as Romeo: Peter Marc Jacobson, the series' executive producer and Ms. Drescher's real-life husband. CBS.* "The Man Who Wouldn't Die" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Amy Biancolli and Amy Biancolli,ALBANY TIMES UNION | July 28, 1998
In "Singin' in the Rain," Stanley Donen's brilliant spoof of old Hollywood, a squeaky-voiced, platinum-shagged silent film goddess named Lina Lamont (played by Jean Hagen) is faced with a terrifying reality: sound.Movies are starting to talk, and she's got a voice that pops light bulbs. "I ceeeeeen't steend 'im!" bleats Lina in her strangled helium soprano, as her voice coach reacts with stoicism and dismay. Gently, she corrects her: "I caaaahn't staaahnd him."Finally, after weeks of struggling, Lina says on screen: "I caaaahhhhn't steend 'im!"
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
Feared in its earliest days as the messenger of death for the movies, television instead became Hollywood's most important partner, and Oscar night represents TV's ultimate tribute. But look for first-time host David Letterman to puncture some of the posturing -- and "Forrest Gump" to collect a few statues.* "Barbara Walters Special" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- In her annual pre-show, the interviewer chats with Michael Douglas, Jim Carrey and Liam Neeson. Hmmm. Couldn't she have found an actress for balance?
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 17, 1994
I haven't had to complain for a while about things being slow, but tonight TV seems to be taking a breather. There's a devilishly imaginative episode of "Northern Exposure," where the devil himself seems to be visiting Alaska -- but past that, there's not much going on.* "The Nanny." (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Without waiting the usual nine months, Fran (Fran Drescher) has a baby. She found it on the subway -- and took it home, one presumes, as a token of her affection. CBS.* "Melrose Place."
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