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NEWS
December 5, 2013
It is most disturbing that former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and so many current members of the U.S. Senate and House do not understand that minority rule in either house of Congress was one of the fears expressed by the Framers of the Constitution ( "The nuclear option: then and now," Dec. 1). The "nuclear option" of eliminating the filibuster for certain appointments is not a reversal of the intent of the Framers - it is a return to their original intent. Indeed, the entire portion of Rule 22 of the Senate that requires any vote to be more than a majority of the quorum present is in violation of the higher ranking "supreme law of the land.
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NEWS
June 4, 2014
In his zeal to make the case supporting the propriety of public prayer, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. bases his argument on two falsehoods ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). First, he says "the framers never used the phrase 'separation of church and state' - except that Thomas Jefferson coined that phrase, approvingly, in his letter to the Danbury Baptist Church. James Madison used the same language in his letter to Robert Walsh. Since these men are, respectively, the authors of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights, I believe they do qualify as the "framers.
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NEWS
July 31, 2012
The 1st Amendment allows us freedom of speech, but that doesn't give us license to yell "FIRE!" in a crowded theater. Doesn't similar logic also apply to the 2nd Amendment, written at a time when the muzzle-loaded musket was state of the art? David Weinstock, Forest Hill
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
It's not every day that a law professor has his book quoted by the Supreme Court, and so the University of Baltimore's Michael I. Meyerson was understandably intrigued when his 2012 work about the Framers' views on religion made it into Monday's decision on public prayer. But the plug from Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion, was somewhat bittersweet. Meyerson says the decision misread the point of his book and took the quote out of context in a way that allowed the justices to draw an entirely different conclusion about how the Founding Fathers approached religion in public.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
In his zeal to make the case supporting the propriety of public prayer, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. bases his argument on two falsehoods ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). First, he says "the framers never used the phrase 'separation of church and state' - except that Thomas Jefferson coined that phrase, approvingly, in his letter to the Danbury Baptist Church. James Madison used the same language in his letter to Robert Walsh. Since these men are, respectively, the authors of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights, I believe they do qualify as the "framers.
NEWS
March 31, 2012
In 1776, there were an estimated 2.5 million folks living in the New Colonies. Today, there are 311 million individuals who must be included when we consider their needs and make laws. How is it that the Baltimore Sun editorial staff, the media, our politicians, experts and even the president rarely, if ever, addresses this profound condition? Population growth and its problems should be the first factor in any national logistics planning. Furthermore, do we have confidence that the framers of the Constitution could see into the future?
NEWS
September 11, 1998
WHAT is required to impeach the president of the United States? What terrible thing must he or she have done to put the nation to such trauma?The president, vice president and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.-- U.S. ConstitutionLegal scholar Raoul Berger in his celebrated 1973 book, "Impeachment: The Constitutional Problems," addressed this. He said again and again, in varying vocabulary, that it must be a crime of magnitude against the state, against the community, that it need not be an indictable offense but it must be a "great offense."
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Seems you can't get good help these days.Just ask framer Ronald White. Working in one of the busiest homebuilding seasons in years, he has struggled all spring to find carpenters. He has put ads in the newspapers and raised his starting pay. But workers either don't show up or don't stay.Soon after starting a job in Howard County, he had three men quit in one day."This is as bad as I've ever seen it," said White, who has been building houses for 15 years.Throughout the country, builders are struggling to find skilled workers, with framers topping the builders' wish list.
NEWS
By LINDA R. MONK | March 4, 1993
Rockville. -- At the main entrance to the Maryland statehouse, a statue of Roger Taney peers out over the Annapolis waterfront.This son of Maryland rates his place on the state's front lawn because he was the fifth chief justice of the United States, who wrote the infamous Dred Scott decision in 1857, holding that even freed blacks could not be citizens of the United States.To Taney, the framers of the Constitution clearly did not intend that persons of African ancestry be included as part of ''We the People'' or its government.
NEWS
By Tim Baker and Emily Baker | July 21, 2005
`ORIGINAL INTENT" and "Originalism." You'll hear these terms often this summer as the Senate considers Judge John G. Roberts Jr., President Bush's nominee to take Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's seat on the Supreme Court. They are shorthand for related theories of constitutional interpretation. Both would restrict the courts to the original meaning of a constitutional provision. "Original intent" requires judges to ascertain the meaning that the framers had in mind. "Originalism" (or "textualism," as it is sometimes called)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 6, 2014
Let me present a hypothetical situation that gets to the heart of the Supreme Court's unfortunate decision on prayer at local government meetings. I'll make the setting Carroll County because that's where elected officials eagerly invoke Jesus Christ at meetings of the Board of County Commissioners. Let's say you own a piece of property in some increasingly suburbanized section of the county. You want it rezoned so you can build a convenience store and gas station. You have to convince the commissioners that the area has changed enough to warrant rezoning.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
It is most disturbing that former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and so many current members of the U.S. Senate and House do not understand that minority rule in either house of Congress was one of the fears expressed by the Framers of the Constitution ( "The nuclear option: then and now," Dec. 1). The "nuclear option" of eliminating the filibuster for certain appointments is not a reversal of the intent of the Framers - it is a return to their original intent. Indeed, the entire portion of Rule 22 of the Senate that requires any vote to be more than a majority of the quorum present is in violation of the higher ranking "supreme law of the land.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Richard A. Lowndes, a flight instructor and master picture framer, died June 15 of complications after heart surgery at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. The former Riderwood resident was 61. The son of a Maryland National Bank executive and a fine-arts appraiser, Richard Arden Lowndes was born in Baltimore and raised on Springway Road in Riderwood. He used his middle name of Arden. Mr. Lowndes was a great-grandson of Lloyd Lowndes Jr., who was elected Maryland governor in 1896.
NEWS
July 31, 2012
The 1st Amendment allows us freedom of speech, but that doesn't give us license to yell "FIRE!" in a crowded theater. Doesn't similar logic also apply to the 2nd Amendment, written at a time when the muzzle-loaded musket was state of the art? David Weinstock, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Douglas F. Gansler | June 18, 2012
The Supreme Court is expected to rule on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act in the coming days, and it's hard to predict how the justices will rule. But that's not because the Constitution is unclear. Ideologues have muddied the issue by suggesting that this case is about whether Congress has the power to force us to quit smoking, exercise, and even eat broccoli. It's not. My office filed a brief on behalf of 11 states,Washington, D.C., and the Virgin Islands to remind the Supreme Court of what this case is really about: Congress' ability to address national problems that states cannot comprehensively address on their own. Whether the members of the court or the public like the act is irrelevant.
NEWS
March 31, 2012
In 1776, there were an estimated 2.5 million folks living in the New Colonies. Today, there are 311 million individuals who must be included when we consider their needs and make laws. How is it that the Baltimore Sun editorial staff, the media, our politicians, experts and even the president rarely, if ever, addresses this profound condition? Population growth and its problems should be the first factor in any national logistics planning. Furthermore, do we have confidence that the framers of the Constitution could see into the future?
NEWS
December 19, 1991
Comptroller, Comptrol ThyselfEditor: Gov. William Donald Schaefer prepares ''doomsday'' budget plans. Mayor Kurt Schmoke predicts a crisis if the state does not fund more money for Baltimore. Comptroller Jacqueline McLean says, "Let them eat cake."R. A. Bacigalupa.Baltimore.Editor: Michael Olesker's Dec. 12 column indicates that although Jacqueline McLean is a black woman, she's out of the gate running like a stereotypical white male politician. Double talk and personal advantage from taxpayer dollars are still the name of the game, apparently.
NEWS
By Michael I. Meyerson | October 9, 2002
President Bush's proposed resolution to Congress seeking authorization to use force against Iraq is a constitutionally inappropriate mechanism for starting a war. The Constitution placed the power to declare war in the hands of Congress. While there always has been a tension between this responsibility and that of the president as commander in chief, the framers of the Constitution were clear that only Congress can plunge us into war. The constitutional scheme is premised on a mistrust of presidential power.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Raymond A. Benson, a picture framer and former art gallery owner, died Dec. 29 of complications from an ulcer at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 65. The son of an engineer and a homemaker, Raymond Alan Benson was born in Philadelphia and spent his early years in Drexel Hill, Pa., before moving to Norwood, Pa., where he graduated in 1963 from Interboro High School. After high school, he moved in 1964 with his family to Timonium. Mr. Benson was a 1969 graduate of what is now Towson University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in art. In 1970, he married his college sweetheart, the former Sinikka Paavola.
NEWS
By Colin Hanna | January 24, 2010
I n a recent New York Times op-ed, journalist Michael Kinsley suggests a system for deciding how to try people like the alleged Christmas Day underpants bomber, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab. Mr. Kinsley suggests that our national border is the "bright line" that alone should determine whether suspects like Mr. Abdulmutallab are tried in U.S. criminal courts or in military courts. He argues that people captured within the U.S., regardless of their citizenship status, should be tried in U.S. courts with the same rights as U.S. citizens.
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