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NEWS
February 19, 2013
Should I consider changing the frames on my artwork/wall art to keep them looking up to date? It depends on how the frames were chosen initially. If the original design was a trend of the moment, and the look no longer fits the tastes or decor of the owner, definitely change the frame — and most likely the mat, too. If the proper conservation materials are used, the frame will likely never need to be replaced. We like to tell our customers that as much as we enjoy seeing the art and working on it, once the customer takes it home, we hope to never see it again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Driver | February 25, 2014
Garry Spears, with a pen in his right hand, leans over a designer's table just inside the front door of his store, The Art of Framing, in South Laurel on a recent Monday morning as two customers look on. "This is a quarter-inch and this is 2 inches of matting [that is] showing," Spears says to Monica Kapps, a customer for nearly 20 years. Store owner, framer and art consultant, Spears, 68, weathered a recession about eight years ago and several store moves and is now marking a quarter of a century of doing business in Laurel.
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FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | July 10, 2010
I love art. When I was growing up, my friends would hang Michael Jordan posters on their walls while I tended more toward Salvador Dali. When I was in high school, I happened upon a small vintage poster and pinned it to my wall. After I graduated college, I had it framed. Cheaply. No conservation glass, archival mounting or acid-free mat. Today, it turns out that poster is worth a good bit more than I paid for it. But the lame frame job hasn't helped it keep its value. Having visited countless galleries, framing shops, design studios, and beautifully decorated homes over the past decade or so, I've seen a wide variety of art, pictures, and other keepsakes displayed on those walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
The Arthouse Pizza Bar and Gallery may be the ultimate Hampden eatery: It encapsulates what's great about the funky neighborhood - and what can be annoying. A deep, narrow building with a rough urban vibe including brick walls, weathered wood and vibrant, expressionist paintings by local artists? Great. But wait staff who seem a little too cool for their own good? Annoying. Fortunately, the tiebreaker goes to great. The Arthouse's thoughtful, casual food looks and tastes good enough to forgive an hourlong wait for appetizers.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
On January 3, 2004 RUTH (Toots) (nee Bloom) beloved wife of the late H. Ray Frame, beloved mother of Don Frame, loving grandmother of Ryan Frame. Services and interment private, at the convenience of the family. Please omit flowers. Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Decorative frames are so decorative these days you might not even notice the pictures inside them. Here's a sampling of some of the most unusual and ornate from area stores (pictured clockwise):Wood and iron vertical triple frame ($28). Fetco International. At the Baltimore Museum of Art gift shop.Filigreed musical instrument frame ($52) made from a nickel and silver mix. David Howell & Co. At Bertaux Gallery & Framing Place, area locations.Frame for a child's picture interwoven with ribbon in pink, blue, yellow or green ($22)
NEWS
September 20, 2005
JOHN WARREN FRAME III, 85, died Friday, September 16, 2005 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born on February 21, 1920 in West Chester, PA, he was the son of the late John Warren Frame II and Alta Etty Frame. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 59 years, Florence Ayres Frame, in 2001. In June of 1942, John graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree from Drexel Institute of Technology, where he became a member of the Phi Kappa Beta Fraternity and the Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | March 8, 1998
THE announcement last week that the Baltimore Museum of Art will remount its collection of Matisse paintings in traditional frames has set me to thinking about how frames change the meaning of artworks.There is a quite dramatic example of this at the Walters Art Gallery. The museum has a lovely "Madonna and Child" by the 15th-century Florentine painter Fra Filippo Lippi. The work is mounted in a heavy, gilt wood frame carved to resemble a window.The interesting thing about this picture is that part of the Madonna's halo is cut off by the top edge of the frame.
NEWS
By HIRAM W. WOODWARD Jr | May 6, 1991
Artists make works of art; curators tend to be responsible forthe frames. Frames are not only pieces of wood around an oil painting, they are case fabrics behind a small bronze, the appearance and content of a label, the color of the wall.Even more broadly, much that belongs to the viewer's share of the museum experience, for which the curator is less responsible, can be considered frame: powers of sympathy and intuition, knowledge and memory, and tired feet or an empty stomach.Seldom is there an installation in which frame has loomed as large as in the mid-19th-century Hackerman House of the Walters Art Gallery that opened yesterday.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | February 26, 1995
When Whimsicals closed in Towson Commons, owner Julie Craig decided to continue her successful business covering picture frames out of her home.She provides you with a list of sizes, yardage requirements and prices. You send the fabric -- one that coordinates with your decor -- and a 50-percent deposit. All orders are shipped within two weeks. A standard 8-by-10 frame, for instance, costs $34.For more information, call Whimsical Frames at (410) 252-0566.Tulips also riseRoses get all the press this month, what with Valentine's Day, but cut tulips are a cheerful reminder that spring is coming.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Pauline H. "June" Brannan, an artist and former owner of a Mount Washington frame shop, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure and kidney disease at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Ruxton resident was 85. The daughter of farmers, Pauline Hillary Crapster was born in Woodbine and raised in Anne Arundel County. She was a 1945 graduate of Glen Burnie High School. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park and in 1950 married Robert R. Brannan Sr. The couple settled in the Four Winds neighborhood, where they raised their five children.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Should I consider changing the frames on my artwork/wall art to keep them looking up to date? It depends on how the frames were chosen initially. If the original design was a trend of the moment, and the look no longer fits the tastes or decor of the owner, definitely change the frame — and most likely the mat, too. If the proper conservation materials are used, the frame will likely never need to be replaced. We like to tell our customers that as much as we enjoy seeing the art and working on it, once the customer takes it home, we hope to never see it again.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | September 19, 2012
If you tune in Saturday to watch Maryland play No. 8 West Virginia, do yourself a favor: Keep your eyes on the Mountaineers' Tavon Austin , the Baltimore kid who wears No. 1 and might be the most exciting player in the whole country. It's hard to believe he's a senior already, a slot receiver with the same Smurfs body-type he had during a legendary high school career at Dunbar. The Mountaineers list him at 5-foot-9 and 171 pounds, and that looks generous. But he's still the classic little man in a big man's game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Mitt Romney's campaign got its shot at introducing Paul Ryan to America Saturday morning in front of the USS Wisconsin in Norfolk, Va. But the more important introduction in terms of mainstream America came Sunday night courtesy of '60 Minutes,' which scored the first sit-down TV interview with the Republican team. I'm glad Schieffer and '60 Minutes'  were the ones the Romney campaign chose to talk to. The veteran Washington journalist and the production team from the most successful news show in the history of the medium handled the conversation as well as it could be handled.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
It took 25-plus innings at Citi Field before the Orioles' offense finally woke up, finally shook off a near-historic malaise and put some runs on the board. They only had two more innings to make the runs count, though. And they couldn't in a 4-3 loss that cemented the New York Mets' three-game sweep against a suddenly scuffling Orioles squad. “It was a frustrating series, especially the first 25 innings, I'd say,” Orioles center fielder Adam Jones said. “Very, very frustrating.
NEWS
By Kurt Schmoke, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
During my time in office, members of the downtown business community and other citizens urged me to take action against the area known as The Block. Since the end of World War II, The Block has been a concentration of strip clubs and X-rated bookstores. However, by the 1990s, The Block acquired a reputation for attracting people engaged in drug dealing, prostitution and other unsavory activity. Pressure mounted to close the last remaining block of what once was three blocks of sex-based entertainment.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Ann Lopez was getting water through the wooden fram around her front door when it rained hard. Three years ago, she replaced the frame with one made of cast cement for $1,000. That solved the water problem but created another one.Now this Edmondson Heights woman, who has lived for 40 years in her three-bedroom home in the 1000 block of Harwall Road, could go to jail.The Edmondson Heights Civic Association said the new frame was out of step with the neighborhood's wooden door frames and violated its covenants.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | May 30, 1993
One reason the cost of bowling has climbed in recent years is simple -- bowling center owners have lost lineage. But lostlineage can be regained and costs can be held in check.Joe Rineer wants to do that."I'm a bowler, but I'm also a businessman," said the owner of Mount Airy Lanes."As a bowler I don't want to see the price of the game increase, but as a businessman I must maintain prices in order to cover cost, to keep the center operating."At one time, in the not-too-distant past, all bowling centers had five-member teams bowling twice per night in an early league and a late league.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
During spring football in 2008, Minoso Rodgers met a mature-beyond-his-years running back named Albert Reid and immediately predicted big things for the eighth-grader. “I loved his build,” said Rodgers, the running backs coach at Friendship Collegiate High in Washington. “He had a nice, thick frame and he definitely got started in the weight room and looked like a football player. He got himself on the field, making some upperclassmen look [silly] in spring ball … making them miss.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 14, 2011
Orem "Jerry" Wahl, the co-owner of a Mount Vernon framing shop who was a theater first-nighter, died of a heart attack Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 73. Pat Moran, a friend and film casting agent, said he was stricken while in the lobby of his home, the St. Paul at Chase condominium. Born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore, he was a 1955 Patterson High School graduate. As a child he was a drum major and performed in local theater. Friends said he spent his childhood weekend afternoons at the old State Theatre on East Monument Street where vaudeville acts played alongside films.
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