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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 12, 2002
Frailty, thy name is ... Frailty. The directorial debut of Bill Paxton, who doubles as co-star in the role of a wholesome, God-fearing ax-murderer, is a blood thriller with a broken back. Written by Brent Hanley, this piece of petit-Grande Guignol wants to be American Gothic poetry comparable to Charles Laughton's Night of the Hunter. But it lacks the visual and verbal richness of that eccentric masterpiece or the clean satiric edge of that great cult thriller The Stepfather. Frailty unfolds from the point of view of Paxton's grown son (Matthew McConaughey)
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Colonial Players offers a gem in historical and dramatic substance in its current production of Joanna McClelland Glass' "Trying," continuing through March 2 in Annapolis. This two-person "memory play" is set in 1967 and finds Judge Francis Biddle, 81, a nonfiction character, trying to finish his memoirs with assistance from newly hired Canadian secretary Sarah Schorr, 25. She has been forced on Biddle by his wife, and the two spend the play learning to adjust to each other. Glass waited until she was in her 60s to write of her experiences as secretary to Biddle, the Harvard-educated Philadelphia patrician who became her mentor.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2002
When Bill Paxton was a boy in Fort Worth, Texas, his father, John, would scan the newspaper for lurid killings. He told his son that the culprits sounded like nice people whom the Paxtons should invite for dinner. Paxton said his dad's macabre sense of humor eventually rubbed off. "I've always been fascinated by crime stories and the idea of murder out yonder, where people are isolated and things go on for a long time undetected," the actor explained in a recent interview. When Paxton became frustrated by the roles he was offered a few years ago, he let his childhood interest guide him. Producer David Kirshner showed him Brent Hanley's script for Frailty, about a man who believes an angel has told him to slay demons disguised as human beings.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 3, 2006
Doubt. At the moment, this is the most feared word in the Republican vocabulary. Doubt about the outcome of the elections in November. Doubt about the outcome of the 2008 presidential election. And, most troubling of all, doubt about the wisdom of invading Iraq. What I am hearing with growing frequency from my fellow Republicans is, "What if we made a horrible mistake in invading Iraq? What if history records it as a colossal miscalculation?" GOP strategy going into the midterm elections is to play down Iraq while re-emphasizing the threat of terrorism.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
It's a time-worn story: Mom and Pop finally reach retirement age, sell the old family home and head south to a blissful retirement under Florida palms. But new reports on domestic migration from the 2000 census suggest that many of the oldest snowbirds are returning north near the end of their lives, perhaps to go "home" again, or to be closer, as they grow frailer, to their adult children. Florida, still the nation's most popular retirement destination, with a net gain of 149,000 people age 65 and older during the last half of the 1990s, recorded a net "outmigration" of the very old -- people age 85 and older, the bureau said in a report released today.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 21, 1998
Adultery by Republicans is part of universal human frailty. Adultery by Democrats is moral depravity of the worst order.This distinction will be observed until the end of time or the end of Republican majority in the House of Representatives, whichever comes first.But at last we have a president who can walk and chew gum at the same time.Maybe Baltimore doesn't really need a mayor.Pub Date: 12/21/98
NEWS
June 19, 2001
LAST YEAR, George W. Bush impressed political observers here by surpassing their cartoonish low expectations of him. Now he has done it in Europe, too. That appears to have been the chief goal of his five-day, six-stop trip. If so, it was a success. No longer will respectable British newspapers bill him as a "cowboy in Yurp." He impressed all as a responsible and informed leader of the most powerful nation on earth. That said, Americans need time to compare the coziness with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia to the chill with fellow Western conservatives.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
It's great that Disney is pushing his new movie hard, says Bill Paxton. The studio is promoting The Greatest Game Ever Played as an inspirational family film in the same vein as such earlier studio releases as Remember the Titans and Miracle. Certainly such promotion should put plenty of people in theater seats when the film opens today. Game tells the story of Francis Ouimet, a 20-year-old Bostonian who overcame all manner of obstacles to come out of nowhere and win the 1913 U.S. Open golf championship.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 3, 2006
Doubt. At the moment, this is the most feared word in the Republican vocabulary. Doubt about the outcome of the elections in November. Doubt about the outcome of the 2008 presidential election. And, most troubling of all, doubt about the wisdom of invading Iraq. What I am hearing with growing frequency from my fellow Republicans is, "What if we made a horrible mistake in invading Iraq? What if history records it as a colossal miscalculation?" GOP strategy going into the midterm elections is to play down Iraq while re-emphasizing the threat of terrorism.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | October 10, 1993
ATHENS -- It is being billed as the fight of the dinosaurs, a titanic struggle between two ancient Greeks.Exonerated from charges of corruption and phone tapping, ailing former leader Andreas Papandreou, 74, is attempting to make a political comeback in today's Greek elections by ousting his rival of 30 years, Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis, 75.A desperate, American-style TV campaign against Mr. Papandreou seems to have had little effect on average...
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
It's great that Disney is pushing his new movie hard, says Bill Paxton. The studio is promoting The Greatest Game Ever Played as an inspirational family film in the same vein as such earlier studio releases as Remember the Titans and Miracle. Certainly such promotion should put plenty of people in theater seats when the film opens today. Game tells the story of Francis Ouimet, a 20-year-old Bostonian who overcame all manner of obstacles to come out of nowhere and win the 1913 U.S. Open golf championship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Temes and Peter Temes,Special to the Sun | June 27, 2004
The Tyrant's Novel, by Thomas Keneally. Doubleday. 256 pages. $25. One consolation of eras in which governments thread the gates of cities with barbed wire and overuse verbs like "detain" is the powerful art such times often produce, and powerful literature in particular. Only civil war could give us Whitman; only the gulag could give us Solzhenitsyn. And perhaps the fresh constrictions of our own era will give us, in damning countermeasure, the great literature we deserve. Perhaps we shall take as partial recompense for our anxieties -- to say nothing of our sins -- the better books our age might deliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Elroy Nights, by Frederick Barthelme. Counterpoint Press, 224 pages. $24. Much has been made of the fragility of human relationships. But what is really astonishing about affection is how strong it is -- and this is the territory Frederick Barthelme maps in Elroy Nights. Elroy Nights is a college art professor in his 50s. He has a pretty good life: a relatively undemanding job at Dry River University in D'Iberville, Miss., a steady wife named Clare, a stepdaughter who has crossed the shoals of adolescence, a big brick house on the water.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
It's a time-worn story: Mom and Pop finally reach retirement age, sell the old family home and head south to a blissful retirement under Florida palms. But new reports on domestic migration from the 2000 census suggest that many of the oldest snowbirds are returning north near the end of their lives, perhaps to go "home" again, or to be closer, as they grow frailer, to their adult children. Florida, still the nation's most popular retirement destination, with a net gain of 149,000 people age 65 and older during the last half of the 1990s, recorded a net "outmigration" of the very old -- people age 85 and older, the bureau said in a report released today.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nine days before Seabiscuit's national debut, filmmaker Gary Ross, who previously wrote the hit comedies Big and Dave and wrote and directed the subversive fantasy Pleasantville, sat in a D.C. cafe and said: "Sometimes we give ourselves a little too much credit for the way things are rendered. Sometimes what gives our work its impact are the facts and power of the story." (The movie opens across the country Friday and receives its Maryland premiere tonight at the Senator, in a sold-out benefit for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Maryland Horse Industry Foundation.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2002
When Bill Paxton was a boy in Fort Worth, Texas, his father, John, would scan the newspaper for lurid killings. He told his son that the culprits sounded like nice people whom the Paxtons should invite for dinner. Paxton said his dad's macabre sense of humor eventually rubbed off. "I've always been fascinated by crime stories and the idea of murder out yonder, where people are isolated and things go on for a long time undetected," the actor explained in a recent interview. When Paxton became frustrated by the roles he was offered a few years ago, he let his childhood interest guide him. Producer David Kirshner showed him Brent Hanley's script for Frailty, about a man who believes an angel has told him to slay demons disguised as human beings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and By John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | February 18, 2001
It started with one fish. Actually, it was the outline of a fish, glued to the backs of automobiles. The Greek word for fish, "ichthys," which the early Christians understood as an acrostic for "Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior." Then, for believers whose Greek or church history may have been skimpy, came the outline of a fish surrounding the name "JESUS." Some wit began to sell a fish outline with little feet and the name "DARWIN" inside. I have even seen a car bearing on its trunk a large JESUS fish swallowing a small DARWIN fish.
NEWS
September 23, 1991
Some in Anne Arundel County government will remember 1991 as the Year of Human Frailty. First came bingo. Next porn shops and peep shows. Now it's massage parlors that, as a headline writer so delicately put it, "rub the county the wrong way."After discovering organized crime ties to part of the county's commercial bingo industry, county government began reexamining ways of regulating this vestige of legalized gambling. New law seems probable by year-end.No sooner was that problem shuffled off to a task force for study, up popped proposals for two "adult entertainment" shops whose owners wanted to include sexually explicit peep shows as part of their "service."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 12, 2002
Frailty, thy name is ... Frailty. The directorial debut of Bill Paxton, who doubles as co-star in the role of a wholesome, God-fearing ax-murderer, is a blood thriller with a broken back. Written by Brent Hanley, this piece of petit-Grande Guignol wants to be American Gothic poetry comparable to Charles Laughton's Night of the Hunter. But it lacks the visual and verbal richness of that eccentric masterpiece or the clean satiric edge of that great cult thriller The Stepfather. Frailty unfolds from the point of view of Paxton's grown son (Matthew McConaughey)
NEWS
June 19, 2001
LAST YEAR, George W. Bush impressed political observers here by surpassing their cartoonish low expectations of him. Now he has done it in Europe, too. That appears to have been the chief goal of his five-day, six-stop trip. If so, it was a success. No longer will respectable British newspapers bill him as a "cowboy in Yurp." He impressed all as a responsible and informed leader of the most powerful nation on earth. That said, Americans need time to compare the coziness with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia to the chill with fellow Western conservatives.
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