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Fragments

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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Alas, they still haven't found the missing star. But several fragments of the 30-foot-by-42-foot star-spangled banner that flew over Fort McHenry after the Battle of Baltimore are up for sale this week at a Boston auction house. Pre-bidding is under way for the 3-inch-by-3-inch swatches of the flag, a smaller version of which inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that became the national anthem. Bidding at RR Auction began at $10,000 but is expected to go much higher. Live auction bidding will begin at 3 p.m. Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Alas, they still haven't found the missing star. But several fragments of the 30-foot-by-42-foot star-spangled banner that flew over Fort McHenry after the Battle of Baltimore are up for sale this week at a Boston auction house. Pre-bidding is under way for the 3-inch-by-3-inch swatches of the flag, a smaller version of which inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that became the national anthem. Bidding at RR Auction began at $10,000 but is expected to go much higher. Live auction bidding will begin at 3 p.m. Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
"Fragments" is a movie-lover's feast made up of hors d'oeuvres. This hour-and-50-minute program, airing on TCM at 8 p.m. Sunday, showcases restored fragments of lost movies — or restored trailers — that are sometimes amazing, frequently amusing and rarely less than fascinating. The best parts of "Fragments" make most contemporary movies seem pale and timid by comparison.The original "It Girl," Clara Bow, in the ruddy palette of circa-1928 Technicolor, is almost alarmingly alluring.
NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Personnel and guests at Fort Meade gathered Thursday, on the anniversary of the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil, to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost that day - and pay tribute to 411 fallen first responders with the unveiling of a stained-glass image that includes a piece of the World Trade Center. "It has been 13 years since New York City, New Jersey, and the D.C.-area emergency responders became the stuff of legend as firefighters, police officers and paramedic EMTs followed the call of duty into the pages of history," Deputy Garrison Cmdr.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Some of the best-preserved and least-viewed fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which have been objects of religious veneration and of venomous scholarly debate, will go on display at the Library of Congress in April, the first major American exhibition of the scrolls in a generation.The exhibition, proposed by a representative of the Israeli Antiquity Authority in December 1991, near the height of the furor over access to the documents, will include at least 11 major scroll fragments.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
Officials at the National Institutes of Health believe they can still obtain a patent for more than 2,400 gene fragments despite an initial rejection by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.The NIH's application to patent gene sequences that it discovered a year ago was intended to protect the nation's biotechnology industry.Instead, it has caused a contentious debate between the government and academic researchers who are trying to draw a map of the 50,000 to 100,000 genes in the human body.
NEWS
By John Rivera | September 18, 1991
DeForest Williams, who came close yesterday to being the latest Baltimore murder statistic, was feeling like a very lucky man.Mr. Williams was wounded by bullet fragments when a shot rippedthrough the window of his car shortly before 3 p.m. as he drove with his girlfriend in the 1700 block of East Fayette Street. Police said he had driven unsuspectingly into the middle of a fight between two groups of youths.But the result could have been much worse."I'm living, so I'm blessed," said Mr. Williams, a 23-year-old junior at Morgan State University.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2003
The desk set - a few pieces of plastic amateurishly glued together - is battered and scratched. The pen was snapped off years ago. On the left side is a yellowing blob of epoxy in the shape of a rock. On the right is a small plaque: "Presented to JOE HEALY From his friends at LRL." Cost: at least $50,000, the minimum bid in an Internet auction now under way. This nondescript piece - a retirement gift to Healy, an engineer at NASA's Lunar Receiving Laboratory who worked on the Apollo missions and who died a decade ago - is believed to contain some of the rarest material to be found on Earth: fragments of the moon.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
Bigger, in evolutionary terms, may not be better.New research lends support to a recent scientific idea that modern humanity might be the product of an evolutionary decline - in body size.The reason, says John Kappelman, a University of Texas paleoanthropologist who was one of the first to raise the idea, might be that evolution has selected for cooperation and communication instead of brawn.The new research by scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and Kappelman's commentary on it appear in last week's issue of the British journal Nature.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
Orioles reliever Tim Byrdak was placed on the disabled list after last night's 15-1 loss to the Cleveland Indians because X-rays revealed bone fragments in his throwing elbow. Byrdak will have surgery Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital and said he expects to be out at least six weeks. His injury left manager Sam Perlozzo without an obvious candidate to match up with left-handed batters in the late innings. He could have turned to left-handed long reliever John Halama or right-hander Sendy Rleal, whose changeup is hard on left-handed hitters.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore police trainee was injured Tuesday morning when a fragmented bullet struck his thigh during target-shooting practice. The incident occurred about 10:50 a.m. during a training exercise at a facility on the Maryland Army National Guard base in Glen Arm, Baltimore County, city police said. A bullet ricocheted off a metal target holder, causing the bullet to fragment, and a piece then hit the trainee in the upper thigh, according to police spokesman Sgt. Eric Kowalczyk.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
I like Oprah Winfrey, and I was happy to see her Tuesday morning on CBS with her old pal, Gayle King, hitting on all cylinders as they hyped the gate for her interview with Lance Armstrong. She promised King, Charlie Rose and everyone else on the last-place morning show set, "You will be satisfied," by the interview that airs Thursday night on the OWN cable channel. "You will come away understanding that he brought it," she said, though she did hedge on the  specific extent of his confession versus her expectations.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
Johns Hopkins intensive care nurse Nelly E. Lopez spends so much of her workday monitoring patient distress alarms that she sometimes hears phantom beeps even when she is no longer on the job. Hopkins doctors say Lopez's "alarm fatigue" shows what is wrong with hospital intensive care units, which they describe as fragmented systems made up of dozens of machines that don't talk to one another. The constant alarms, invasive instruments and unwieldy number of machines create a stressful, and sometimes unsafe, environment for the medical staff as well as ICU patients, who are the ones in most critical condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
"Fragments" is a movie-lover's feast made up of hors d'oeuvres. This hour-and-50-minute program, airing on TCM at 8 p.m. Sunday, showcases restored fragments of lost movies — or restored trailers — that are sometimes amazing, frequently amusing and rarely less than fascinating. The best parts of "Fragments" make most contemporary movies seem pale and timid by comparison.The original "It Girl," Clara Bow, in the ruddy palette of circa-1928 Technicolor, is almost alarmingly alluring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Throughout 2008, as America was transfixed by a historical and climactic presidential election and a scary economic meltdown, pop music became blurry. Styles morphed more than they did the year before as mainstream acts dissolved sonic barriers. Easy signifiers of certain genres all but disappeared. So-called indie rock, which generally prided itself on a ragged, warts-and-all style musicianship, was suffused with inventive textures (a layering of strings, for instance) and compelling melodies.
SPORTS
October 22, 2008
1 World Serious: Rays. Phillies. Game 1 (8:35 p.m., chs. 45, 5). Fall Classic. Kind of makes you want to write sentence fragments. 2 Off to see the Wiz: The NBA season is almost upon us, so take a preseason gander at the Wizards (at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m., Comcast SportsNet). 3 Let's kick two: CCBC-Essex hosts Baltimore County's girls and boys soccer championships - respectively, Eastern Tech-Loch Raven (5 p.m.) and Parkville-Towson (7). 4 You betcha: You could be walking around lucky and not even know it. Post time at Laurel Park is 1:10 p.m. 5 Feats of clay: MTV2 has two hours of Celebrity Deathmatch starting at noon, though the Claymation bouts might ruin your appetite.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Howard County police discovered fragments from a detonated pipe bomb on a parking lot at Waverly Elementary School in Ellicott City this week, days after arsonists set the school's playground equipment ablaze.A police officer investigating the Friday playground fire found the bomb fragments about noon Tuesday.Later Tuesday, police arrested two 14-year-old Ellicott City boys in connection with the playground fire, according to Sgt. Steven Keller, a police spokesman. He said there did not appear to be any connection between the two incidents.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 23, 2001
Roll over, Verdi. Since 1847, the music world has recognized only one significant operatic version of Shakespeare's Macbeth, the one by Verdi. That work is still in no danger of being supplanted, but audiences will soon get to hear a few notes by another eminent composer who, about 35 years before Verdi, was attracted to the idea of turning that play into an opera - none other than Beethoven. On Sept. 20 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, the National Symphony Orchestra will give the world premiere of the Overture to Beethoven's Macbeth - or at least the next best thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVE ROSENTHAL AND NANCY JOHNSTON and DAVE ROSENTHAL AND NANCY JOHNSTON,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
We asked Baltimore author Michael Kimball about his just-released third novel, Dear Everybody, a collection of letters, diary entries, lists, news articles, encyclopedia entries and other snippets that document the sad life and tragic end of a TV weatherman. On writing in snippets I was trying to make each fragment its own finished piece. But I needed the readers, and wanted the readers, to supply certain things. I showed a few pages to a friend who writes here in Baltimore and he said, "You can't do this."
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2008
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Across Pakistan's frontier, dozens of groups call themselves the Taliban. Some are militant fundamentalists, demanding Islamic law. Others are smugglers, using the name to scare people. Sometimes they team up, or work with al-Qaida militants and Taliban fighters in neighboring Afghanistan. Sometimes they fight each other. The new Pakistani leaders elected in February have pledged to talk with militants in Pakistan's tribal areas rather than using mostly force to confront a rise in Islamic militancy.
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