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By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
A.J. Foyt, Indy car racing's all-time winningest driver (67) and championship record holder (7), is now 77. He's had open heart surgery, and in January went through an illness that nearly killed him. But here he is, alive, opinionated and planning to get his race team back among the top teams in the IndyCar Series. In a recent one-on-one interview Foyt talked about many things, among them why the 1977 Indy 500 win was special to him beyond making him the first driver to win the race four times, the recent announcement that he'll field a car for minority driver Chase Austin in the Indianapolis 500 next May and a recent staph infection following same-day surgeries to remove bone spurs from his artificial knee and repair a rotator cuff.
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By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
A.J. Foyt, Indy car racing's all-time winningest driver (67) and championship record holder (7), is now 77. He's had open heart surgery, and in January went through an illness that nearly killed him. But here he is, alive, opinonated and planning to get his race team back among the top teams in the IndyCar Series. In a recent one-on-one interview Foyt talked about many things, among them why the 1977 Indy 500 win was special to him beyond making him the first driver to win the race four times, the recent announcement that he'll field a car for minority driver Chase Austin in the Indianapolis 500 next May and a recent staph infection following same-day surgeries to remove bone spurs from his artificial knee and repair a rotator cuff.
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By Jim Hodges and Jim Hodges,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1990
It was a late September Sunday in the rolling Kettle-Moraine country of southeastern Wisconsin and A.J. Foyt was tooling down the nearly mile-long straight at Elkhart Lake's Road America, shifting into fifth gear as he drove alongside Dominic Dobson. Ahead was the first of the course's 11 turns, a 90-degree right-hander, and Foyt pushed down the brake pedal to slow the car.Nothing happened.In an instant, he had to decide whether to exit the course into tall grass at the end of the straight or find a way to slow the car enough to negotiate the turn.
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By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
A.J. Foyt Racing announced this morning it is joining with Starting Grid, an organization founded to help diversity motorsports, and American Honda to field a car for Chase Austin, 22, who has long been considered a solid prospect in both open wheel and stock car circles, in next May's Indianapolis 500. At the news conference, Austin couldn't keep the smile from his face. "There's not too many people who get this opportunity," Austin said. "Just to say, 'I'm driving for A.J. Foyt,' not to mention too many who can say, 'I'm going to be driving in the Indy 500.' I am so excited.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
Foyt Sparkler had just turned in a sparkler and was returning to the winner's circle after the feature race at Timonium yesterday.Owner David Syzmanski walked onto the track and gave the 5-year-old gray gelding a kiss on the side of the head."
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | May 24, 1991
INDIANAPOLIS -- Don't waste any sympathy on A.J. Foyt. He doesn't need it. Furthermore, he doesn't want it.Around the garages, some even say he doesn't deserve it, that he should have retired long ago.But that's not A.J. And this is May. His month. And this is the Indianapolis 500. His race.For 34 consecutive years, A.J. Foyt has started this race. He's the first man to have won it four times. Only his old buddy Al Unser has matched that total. No one will ever match 34 straight starts.Sunday, his black Lola Chevy will be in the middle of one of the most famous, most successful and storied front rows in Indianapolis history.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS -- Before I came to the Indianapolis 500 for the first time 24 years ago, I dreamed A. J. Foyt ran over me on the racetrack because he didn't want to do an interview. There was a reason for my nightmare. I had worked for The Evening Sun for less than a year when my sports editor, Bill Tanton, told me I would be covering the 500 and that I had to write a story on Foyt. I didn't know much -- anything, actually -- about racing then. But I did know the name A. J. Foyt. I had read somewhere that if you made an appointment with Foyt before Indy, he was very good about keeping the date.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,The Evening Sun | May 27, 1991
INDIANAPOLIS -- A.J. Foyt drove down pit road to waves o cheers. He put his red-gloved left hand in the air and waved.It wasn't the way Foyt had planned it. This is supposed to be hilast Indianapolis 500, and it wasn't victory lane he was heading for.It was the garage. And the race still had 175 laps to go."Well, I thought I'd give those people a salute," he said, after hi28th- place finish. "I saw their signs, 'We love you, A.J.', 'Give 'em hell, A.J.' and this and that. I just felt I owed them a salute.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- It is going to be the garage sale of all garage sales.A.J. Foyt announced yesterday that the general public will be allowed to get its hands on 35 years of his racing history, valued at an estimated $5 million.Included in the lot is Foyt's 1977 Coyote Indy-winning car, complete with Foyt Engine."All this stuff is in the horse barns down in Houston," Foyt said. "There's so much of it, I just can't keep it all up. It's just going to waste sitting there, and I hate to see that, so I might as well share it with some people who are going to appreciate it."
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 27, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- The pictures of A. J. Foyt flash clearly through the mind:* Foyt lifting the Indianapolis 500 winner's trophy four times.* Foyt screaming at his crew, cursing his fellow drivers, slamming the garage door in the face of the media.* Foyt pulling his race car into the pits, climbing out, grabbing a hammer and taking whack after frustrated whack at the rear fender.Yesterday, rookie driver Robby Gordon tried to expand the image."A. J. has taught me a lot," said Gordon, driver for Foyt's racing team.
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May 14, 2007
"I guess this shows I did more than just throw one pass." Doug Flutie Former Boston College quarterback (above), on entering the College Football Hall of Fame "I'm not really overly concerned with wins." Jason Bergman Washington Nationals pitcher, on focusing more on making quality starts "You know, I don't care if you work for your grandfather or father in a lawn-mowing service, you're always going to be butting heads more than if you were with someone else not related to you." A.J. Foyt IV Racecar driver, on conflicts that led to his departure from the racing team headed by his grandfather, racing legend A.J. Foyt
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Jeff Burton will be driving a backup Ford in tomorrow's Twin 125-Mile qualifying race, thanks to an accident yesterday afternoon. Burton's Ford and that of Elliott Sadler had nowhere to go when the Pontiacs of Mike Skinner and rookie Jack Sprague collided during a practice for Sunday's Daytona 500. "There were so many people there, there was no way to be missed," said Skinner, who was running on the inside lane, three abreast in a big pack of cars. Sprague, running in the middle lane, tapped Skinner's right rear bumper and set things in motion.
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By Sandra McKee | July 14, 2002
Jackpot! And then some. Guess who was holding the winning cards. A. J. Foyt, that's who. Well, he was due, wasn't he? Hadn't had a car in Victory Lane since the 1999 Indy 500. So last weekend in Kansas, his grandson, A. J. Foyt IV, all of 18 and driving on his first big speedway in the first race of the Indy Racing League-Infiniti Pro Series, started from the pole and won the race. And then Foyt's veteran driver in the IRL Series, Airton Dare, winless in three years and beginning to wonder when he would see a checkered flag, won, too - with A. J. IV working as his front-right tire changer.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
ROCKVILLE - No one thought him a particularly brave little boy, but, at age 12, Airton Dare was racing Jet Skis in Brazil. By age 19, he was a six-time Brazilian and one-time South American champion and owned two Jet Ski stores. By the time he was 20, he had given it all up to pursue his dream of racing open-wheel cars in the United States. "I knew when I was 19 I had to decide to stay in Brazil and do what I was doing or go and do the racing," he said during an appearance in Rockville in support of tomorrow's Indy Racing League race at Richmond International Raceway.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS -- Before I came to the Indianapolis 500 for the first time 24 years ago, I dreamed A. J. Foyt ran over me on the racetrack because he didn't want to do an interview. There was a reason for my nightmare. I had worked for The Evening Sun for less than a year when my sports editor, Bill Tanton, told me I would be covering the 500 and that I had to write a story on Foyt. I didn't know much -- anything, actually -- about racing then. But I did know the name A. J. Foyt. I had read somewhere that if you made an appointment with Foyt before Indy, he was very good about keeping the date.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS -- You might walk down the street somewhere around the world and ask for the name of a famous Indianapolis 500 race car driver and find answers that range from Al Unser to Mario Andretti to Emerson Fittipaldi. But if you are walking down a street in Speedway, Ind., or down pit road inside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and you are thinking about the history of the Indianapolis 500, the only name that comes to mind is A. J. Foyt. As the final preparations for tomorrow's 85th Indianapolis 500 are being undertaken, it is still the man in garage A-1 through 5 who draws the biggest crowd.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS -- You might walk down the street somewhere around the world and ask for the name of a famous Indianapolis 500 race car driver and find answers that range from Al Unser to Mario Andretti to Emerson Fittipaldi. But if you are walking down a street in Speedway, Ind., or down pit road inside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and you are thinking about the history of the Indianapolis 500, the only name that comes to mind is A. J. Foyt. As the final preparations for tomorrow's 85th Indianapolis 500 are being undertaken, it is still the man in garage A-1 through 5 who draws the biggest crowd.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2001
MOORESVILLE, N.C. - Where else would you expect to find the cantankerous, four-time Indianapolis 500 champion and owner of open-wheel and stock cars, if not in an old-fashioned garage with bare concrete floors and metal lights dangling from the ceiling? It is from here that A.J. Foyt will send his Winston Cup team with driver Ron Hornaday to Daytona next week. And it is here that his son Larry's Busch Grand National team is housed. Both cars, Hornaday's Pontiac and Larry's Chevrolet, will wear A.J.'s famous No. 14. A.J. enters this new millennium the same way he left the old, doing things his way. And if he comes in conflict with himself on a daily basis, that's just part of the life he chose all those years ago when he decided to go into the business of racing.
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