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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Trapped in a steel cage barely big enough to hold her, the large squirrel was not happy, pawing at the bars and trying them with her teeth. Matt Whitbeck and Cherry Keller of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were glad to see her, though. The furry gray prisoner, released after being weighed and checked, offered yet another sign that the Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, once vanishingly rare, has come back. This supersized, reputedly shy member of the squirrel family now is considered fully recovered, according to federal wildlife officials.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
With the help of Remington Farms in Kent County, the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel has taken another step toward recovery in its historic range on the Eastern Shore.Last month, the Department of Natural Resources released 25 of the endangered species on the preserve."The release of 11 male and 14 female Delmarva fox squirrels was made to bolster the genetics of the small population of the species already established on Remington Farms," said Glenn Therres, DNR's fox squirrel specialist.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
To save fox squirrel, expand the refuge and protect open spacesAs conservationists in Maryland, we think Joel McCord's article about the impact of Congress' conservation funding legislation on Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel ("Environmental groups fear for prospects of endangered squirrel" Sept. 10) captured the essence of the debate: Congress has an opportunity to expand the refuge and protect the squirrels, but could squander it by including "poison pills" in the legislation that could undermine its goals.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
In a first for Maryland, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has struck a deal with a Queen Anne's County developer to set aside land to protect the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel.Developer Maureen Waterman has agreed to set aside a patch of forest at his 16-house Home Port development west of Queenstown, post 15 mph speed limits throughout the 63-acre site and conserve 31 acres of forest about a mile away as habitat for the squirrel, which once was common but now is found in only a handful of places on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
May 21, 1999
THE SLOW-footed, sleepy, portly Delmarva fox squirrel is the subject of a controversial program of the Endangered Species Act that a Queen Anne's County developer hopes to use to build homes along the banks of Winchester Creek.A sighting of the rare squirrel at the planned Homeport development near Grasonville prompted the federal government to consider the project's impact on the protected species. An environmental lawsuit then prodded the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to propose a "Habitat Conservation Plan" for the rodent on the 57-acre farm.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
Proposed federal conservation legislation to add land to the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore could also cripple efforts to save the Delmarva fox squirrel, a coalition of environmental groups said yesterday.The coalition -- including Defenders of Wildlife, the Sierra Club, Maryland Public Interest Research Group (MaryPIRG) and Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage -- yesterday urged Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, an Eastern Shore Republican, and the rest of Maryland's Congressional delegation to oppose certain language in the legislation that it fears would hamper conservation efforts.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Since the end of the spring trophy season, we had taken care to avoid fishing a 15-foot hump off Tolly Point, which had been loaded with rockfish all summer. So it only figured that on Thursday, opening day of the fall rockfish season, the first place we hit should be that very same hump.Maybe 30 minutes in all, and there would be rockfish for thtable Thursday night.There was, however, a complication -- the rockfish were nlonger there.Nor were they near a 20-foot cliff cut by a clammer's dredge on the south edge of the bar, as they had been through most of the summer.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | September 30, 1990
The United States Sailboat Show comes to Annapolis at the end of the week, and the United States Powerboat Show takes over that city's municipal docks and harbor the following weekend.Both shows are opportunities for powerboaters and sailors to see what is new and innovative in the marine industry -- from high-tech sportsfishermen and lavish cruising yachts to the latest in small-boat radar.The shows, billed as the largest in-water shows in the world, come at a time when the boating market is weak.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
A rare squirrel that has found a haven in a few Maryland counties' dwindling forests has triggered a legal battle that could shape the face of development in parts of the Eastern Shore.Defenders of Wildlife, a Washington-based conservation group, filed a federal court case yesterday accusing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of failing to protect the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel from creeping development.The lawsuit focuses on a development proposed for the banks of Winchester Creek in Queen Anne's County.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
Proposed federal conservation legislation to add land to the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore could also cripple efforts to save the Delmarva fox squirrel, a coalition of environmental groups said yesterday.The coalition -- including Defenders of Wildlife, the Sierra Club, Maryland Public Interest Research Group (MaryPIRG) and Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage -- yesterday urged Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, an Eastern Shore Republican, and the rest of Maryland's Congressional delegation to oppose certain language in the legislation that it fears would hamper conservation efforts.
NEWS
May 21, 1999
THE SLOW-footed, sleepy, portly Delmarva fox squirrel is the subject of a controversial program of the Endangered Species Act that a Queen Anne's County developer hopes to use to build homes along the banks of Winchester Creek.A sighting of the rare squirrel at the planned Homeport development near Grasonville prompted the federal government to consider the project's impact on the protected species. An environmental lawsuit then prodded the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to propose a "Habitat Conservation Plan" for the rodent on the 57-acre farm.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
In a first for Maryland, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has struck a deal with a Queen Anne's County developer to set aside land to protect the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel.Developer Maureen Waterman has agreed to set aside a patch of forest at his 16-house Home Port development west of Queenstown, post 15 mph speed limits throughout the 63-acre site and conserve 31 acres of forest about a mile away as habitat for the squirrel, which once was common but now is found in only a handful of places on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
A rare squirrel that has found a haven in a few Maryland counties' dwindling forests has triggered a legal battle that could shape the face of development in parts of the Eastern Shore.Defenders of Wildlife, a Washington-based conservation group, filed a federal court case yesterday accusing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of failing to protect the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel from creeping development.The lawsuit focuses on a development proposed for the banks of Winchester Creek in Queen Anne's County.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
With the help of Remington Farms in Kent County, the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel has taken another step toward recovery in its historic range on the Eastern Shore.Last month, the Department of Natural Resources released 25 of the endangered species on the preserve."The release of 11 male and 14 female Delmarva fox squirrels was made to bolster the genetics of the small population of the species already established on Remington Farms," said Glenn Therres, DNR's fox squirrel specialist.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Since the end of the spring trophy season, we had taken care to avoid fishing a 15-foot hump off Tolly Point, which had been loaded with rockfish all summer. So it only figured that on Thursday, opening day of the fall rockfish season, the first place we hit should be that very same hump.Maybe 30 minutes in all, and there would be rockfish for thtable Thursday night.There was, however, a complication -- the rockfish were nlonger there.Nor were they near a 20-foot cliff cut by a clammer's dredge on the south edge of the bar, as they had been through most of the summer.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
To save fox squirrel, expand the refuge and protect open spacesAs conservationists in Maryland, we think Joel McCord's article about the impact of Congress' conservation funding legislation on Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel ("Environmental groups fear for prospects of endangered squirrel" Sept. 10) captured the essence of the debate: Congress has an opportunity to expand the refuge and protect the squirrels, but could squander it by including "poison pills" in the legislation that could undermine its goals.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | September 30, 1990
The United States Sailboat Show comes to Annapolis at the end of the week, and the United States Powerboat Show takes over that city's municipal docks and harbor the following weekend.Both shows are opportunities for powerboaters and sailors to see what is new and innovative in the marine industry -- from high-tech sportsfishermen and lavish cruising yachts to the latest in small-boat radar.The shows, billed as the largest in-water shows in the world, come at a time when the boating market is weak.
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