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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Staff | December 24, 2006
Ever since Fox News Channel, founded in 1996, proved that news delivered with attitude, opinion and even belligerence could wipe the clock of just about any competitor, CNN - once the undisputed leader of the cable news pack - and a handful of smaller channels have been struggling to find a formula that brings in the same kind of numbers. Now, CNN and the others appear to have found an answer. Virtually all the competitors are slashing at the Fox ratings lead by offering their own versions of noisy and opinionated news.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
If nothing else, give John Stossel this: He seems like one of the straightest talkers in the TV news business. On the eve of launching a new show on the Fox Business Channel, the 62-year-old newsman is asked how things are going six weeks into his move to Fox after 28 years at ABC News. In addition to the new show that makes its debut Monday and is described as a "one-hour program focusing on libertarian and economic issues," Stossel's duties also include appearing on such popular shows on the Fox News Channel as those of Bill O'Reilly and Glenn Beck.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
A new documentary, paid for by liberal advocacy groups, is stirring the media pot by contending that the Fox News Channel is not only conservative but explicitly slanted in favor of Republicans. Called Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism, the film, which was unveiled yesterday at a New York news conference, is intended as a direct assault on the credibility of Fox News. The network has blended reporting and high-decibel political talk shows to become the nation's highest-rated cable news station.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
I f nothing else, give John Stossel this: He seems like one of the straightest talkers in the TV news business. On the eve of launching a new show on the Fox Business Network, the 62-year-old newsman is asked how things are going six weeks into his move to Fox after 28 years at ABC News. In addition to the new show that makes its debut Thursday and is described as a "one-hour program focusing on libertarian and economic issues," Stossel's duties also include appearing on such popular shows on the Fox News Channel as those of Bill O'Reilly and Glenn Beck.
NEWS
By James T. Madore and James T. Madore,NEWSDAY | August 30, 2004
NEW YORK - Demonstrators haven't come to Manhattan solely to denounce President Bush and his policies. At least two protest events are scheduled for the headquarters of big media companies later this week. Organizers of the "March on the Media" hope to draw attention to what they said is uncritical coverage of corporate scandals, terrorism prevention and the war against Iraq. "Corporate media have failed to provide the public with critical, probing coverage of this administration," said Peter Hart, a media analyst at Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, one of the march's sponsors.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
Princell Hair, a former news director at WBAL, Channel 11, has been named to oversee CNN's domestic news programming - part of a network reshuffling aimed at increasing viewership and closing the gap between CNN and its main rival, Fox News Channel. "What we have to focus on is getting viewers to watch longer," Hair said yesterday during a telephone news conference. "This is still the most trusted name in news," he added. "It's certainly my intention to continue that." Hair, who left Baltimore in 2001 after three years at WBAL, replaces Teya Ryan, who resigned yesterday as vice president and general manager of CNN/U.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | November 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - -At least one Democratic political strategist has gotten a blunt warning from the White House to never appear on Fox News Channel, an outlet that presidential aides have depicted as not so much a news-gathering operation as a political opponent bent on damaging the Obama administration. The Democratic strategist said that shortly after an appearance on Fox he got a phone call from a White House official telling him not to be a guest on the show again. The call had an intimidating tone, he said.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 5, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Liberals may think they've found their Bernard Goldberg, the former CBS News correspondent who is making himself a good living, writing books about what he perceived as bias at CBS. He is Charlie Reina, who, until last April, worked as a writer and producer of two shows at the Fox News Channel. The shows he produced were mine, After Hours and Fox News Watch, on which I appear as a panelist. Last week, Mr. Reina, a self-professed liberal, did a "Goldberg" when he posted a memo to Jim Romenesko on the Poynter media Web site, alleging that higher-ups at Fox compose a daily memo to the staff, ordering them to slant news coverage to the right.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 2003
Despite the fact that television coverage of the war with Iraq is often written about as if it were monolithic, there are differences channel to channel. As television networks and all-news cable channels settled in for the longer haul in their coverage of the war with Iraq this week, important distinctions came into focus. None is more important than the difference between CNN and the Fox News Channel. While Fox has steadfastly championed the Pentagon's take on how the war has been going, CNN has been more skeptical and independent in its coverage.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 13, 2004
Outfoxed hammers home the message that Fox News Channel's "Fair and Balanced" motto is a bunch of hooey, at best an example of wishful thinking, at worst - and this documentary definitely assumes the worst - a deliberate attempt to obfuscate its decidedly pro-right, pro-Republican leanings. The idea that "fair and balanced" hardly describes billionaire media mogul Rupert Murdoch's Fox News shouldn't be news to anyone. Outfoxed highlights its roster of firebrand conservatives, including Bill O'Reilly, Brit Hume and Sean Hannity, and makes it clear how delightedly the network pushes the GOP agenda in general, the Bush administration's in particular.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | November 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - -At least one Democratic political strategist has gotten a blunt warning from the White House to never appear on Fox News Channel, an outlet that presidential aides have depicted as not so much a news-gathering operation as a political opponent bent on damaging the Obama administration. The Democratic strategist said that shortly after an appearance on Fox he got a phone call from a White House official telling him not to be a guest on the show again. The call had an intimidating tone, he said.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Staff | December 24, 2006
Ever since Fox News Channel, founded in 1996, proved that news delivered with attitude, opinion and even belligerence could wipe the clock of just about any competitor, CNN - once the undisputed leader of the cable news pack - and a handful of smaller channels have been struggling to find a formula that brings in the same kind of numbers. Now, CNN and the others appear to have found an answer. Virtually all the competitors are slashing at the Fox ratings lead by offering their own versions of noisy and opinionated news.
NEWS
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | October 8, 2006
NEW YORK -- Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes had just announced their intention to create a 24-hour cable news channel from scratch, vowing to launch within a year and take on industry leader CNN. As they walked out of the news conference in the fledging network's Sixth Avenue headquarters in January 1996, Ailes turned to the News Corp. chairman. "I said, `Rupert, they're laughing at us,'" the Fox News chairman and CEO recalled in a recent interview. "And he said, `They always laugh in the beginning.
NEWS
By James T. Madore and James T. Madore,NEWSDAY | August 30, 2004
NEW YORK - Demonstrators haven't come to Manhattan solely to denounce President Bush and his policies. At least two protest events are scheduled for the headquarters of big media companies later this week. Organizers of the "March on the Media" hope to draw attention to what they said is uncritical coverage of corporate scandals, terrorism prevention and the war against Iraq. "Corporate media have failed to provide the public with critical, probing coverage of this administration," said Peter Hart, a media analyst at Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, one of the march's sponsors.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 13, 2004
Outfoxed hammers home the message that Fox News Channel's "Fair and Balanced" motto is a bunch of hooey, at best an example of wishful thinking, at worst - and this documentary definitely assumes the worst - a deliberate attempt to obfuscate its decidedly pro-right, pro-Republican leanings. The idea that "fair and balanced" hardly describes billionaire media mogul Rupert Murdoch's Fox News shouldn't be news to anyone. Outfoxed highlights its roster of firebrand conservatives, including Bill O'Reilly, Brit Hume and Sean Hannity, and makes it clear how delightedly the network pushes the GOP agenda in general, the Bush administration's in particular.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
A new documentary, paid for by liberal advocacy groups, is stirring the media pot by contending that the Fox News Channel is not only conservative but explicitly slanted in favor of Republicans. Called Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism, the film, which was unveiled yesterday at a New York news conference, is intended as a direct assault on the credibility of Fox News. The network has blended reporting and high-decibel political talk shows to become the nation's highest-rated cable news station.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Crazy Like a Fox: The Inside Story of How Fox News Beat CNN, by Scott Collins. Portfolio. 256 pages. $24.95. Let's give away the not-so-secret ending up front: The Fox News Channel is a ratings hit because it reflects the singular vision of Roger Ailes, its CEO and chairman. Integrating quickly paced reports with opinion-heavy programming, Ailes serves a market populated by those disaffected by the so-called "liberal media elite" -- that shadowy quarry conjured up and denounced by such major-league Republicans as former Presidents Richard Nixon and George H.W. Bush.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | May 16, 2001
Q: What do you do if you're CNN during Clinton's impeachment or the Florida recount? A: You gear up for battle, pack a spare toothbrush, and revel in the ratings. Q: What do you do if you're CNN when no crises arise, and a stiff challenge from the Fox News Channel siphons off viewers? A: Apparently, you bet the house on a few big names. The best example is the return of trusted financial news anchor Lou Dobbs after a two-year absence. A celebratory CNN expects him to revive the fortunes of "Moneyline" with a broader-gauged show targeted at a more sophisticated audience that will be less likely to fixate on specific stock picks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Crazy Like a Fox: The Inside Story of How Fox News Beat CNN, by Scott Collins. Portfolio. 256 pages. $24.95. Let's give away the not-so-secret ending up front: The Fox News Channel is a ratings hit because it reflects the singular vision of Roger Ailes, its CEO and chairman. Integrating quickly paced reports with opinion-heavy programming, Ailes serves a market populated by those disaffected by the so-called "liberal media elite" -- that shadowy quarry conjured up and denounced by such major-league Republicans as former Presidents Richard Nixon and George H.W. Bush.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 5, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Liberals may think they've found their Bernard Goldberg, the former CBS News correspondent who is making himself a good living, writing books about what he perceived as bias at CBS. He is Charlie Reina, who, until last April, worked as a writer and producer of two shows at the Fox News Channel. The shows he produced were mine, After Hours and Fox News Watch, on which I appear as a panelist. Last week, Mr. Reina, a self-professed liberal, did a "Goldberg" when he posted a memo to Jim Romenesko on the Poynter media Web site, alleging that higher-ups at Fox compose a daily memo to the staff, ordering them to slant news coverage to the right.
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