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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
It was September 1931. The country was mired in the Great Depression, Al Capone finally had been put behind bars, the Philadelphia Athletics were winning the American League pennant and the centuries-old sport of fox hunting was brought to the woodlands of western Howard County.Sixty years later, the country again is in rough economic straits, but Capone has become mobster history, the Athletics have moved twice -- to Kansas City and Oakland -- and fox hunting is on the brink of extinction in western Howard as open space gives way to three-acre lots, roads and shops.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Margaret P. "Maggie" Brewster, an avid sportswoman who enjoyed fox hunting, skiing and playing tennis, died Nov. 23 of multiple myeloma at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 82. The daughter of Thomas Pierce Perkins Jr., a broker, and Virginia Miller Perkins, a homemaker, the former Margaret Rennert Perkins was born in Baltimore and raised at a home on Chancery Road in Guilford. Her paternal grandfather, Robert Rennert, was the founder in 1885 of the old Rennert Hotel.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
To Elsie Foster Jenkins, nothing compared to sitting atop her horse in the pre-dawn air and hearing the yelps of the hounds as they scampered over brush and under bridges.She loved it when the huntsman gathered the riders at the start of the meet and blew his horn to signal the onset of the tradition she had participated in for decades, each time with new excitement.She enjoyed every aspect of fox hunting.Mrs. Jenkins, 63, of Worthington Valley died Wednesday of cancer at Sinai Hospital. For more than 40 years, she participated in about 60 meets a year, often starting at dawn and ending at dusk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Called to action by the blast of a horn, more than 30 yapping spotted hounds spill down a hill, bound across a country road, leap a fence and rush a faded winter field. On the hound's heels are about two dozen hunters on horseback, men and women in britches and tweed and velvet hats. Motorists, what few there are this deep in the country on a hushed winter morning, a weekday, are slow to take it in. Some stop altogether. For it's something to behold, this pageant of beasts and man -- a scene from another time, another place.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 11, 1997
LONDON -- Yesterday, Shona Elders got political for the first time in her life.The housewife from West Yorkshire took a four-hour bus ride to London, marched into Hyde Park, grabbed a seat on a blanket and joined more than 100,000 other people for the protest of the season.The 100,000 voices were rallying in favor of fox hunting -- and Britain's country way of life."If we were hunting rats, no one would ask us any questions," said Elders, the secretary of the Pennine Foxhounds Foot Pack hunting club.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
After being caught in a bureaucratic thicket for nearly a year, Howard County's fox hunters are finally breaking into the clear. The county Planning Board recommended yesterday zoning approval for the Howard County-Iron Bridge Hounds, a 70-year-old fox-hunting club based on a 100-acre parcel in the western part of the county. The vote helped put to rest the club's run-in with county officials who discovered last summer that the club had built a clubhouse without the required permits. Club officials initially argued that they didn't need formal approval for the clubhouse - which includes a full bar and kitchen - because it was incidental to the "farming operation" at the Windsor Forest Road property.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Margaret P. "Maggie" Brewster, an avid sportswoman who enjoyed fox hunting, skiing and playing tennis, died Nov. 23 of multiple myeloma at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 82. The daughter of Thomas Pierce Perkins Jr., a broker, and Virginia Miller Perkins, a homemaker, the former Margaret Rennert Perkins was born in Baltimore and raised at a home on Chancery Road in Guilford. Her paternal grandfather, Robert Rennert, was the founder in 1885 of the old Rennert Hotel.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 18, 2001
LONDON - Bringing along the spare hound or horse, the tweed-wearing, tea-drinking, folk-singing heart of Middle England converged on the House of Commons yesterday for the longest-running shaggy fox story in British politics. Scores of well-heeled and well-behaved demonstrators arrived to stand up for their right to ride to the hounds and keep alive the age-old blood sport of fox hunting. "It's the country vs. the city," said Richard Thomson-Moore, 22, an agricultural student standing by his 12-year-old golden Labrador named Midas, who was asleep on a bale of hay as horn-blowing cars rumbled by. The dog may not have taken much notice, but the city won, as the House of Commons voted overwhelmingly to bar hunting with dogs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Howard Arthur "Hound Dog" Brown, an Eastern Shore huntsman who bred foxhounds, was a fox hunter until his late 80s, when he switched from a horse to a pickup truck to continue his pursuit of the elusive prey. Mr. Brown, who was 96, died in his sleep April 22 at Chestertown Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. Mr. Brown was born in Baltimore and was raised in Reisterstown and Westminster. He attended Carroll County public schools until dropping out in the eighth grade. "He then began working with horses.
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 26, 1993
A 56-year-old Harford man is free on his own recognizance after his arrest in Baltimore County Saturday on charges of hunting while under the influence of alcohol and possession of a handgun without a permit.Edward Charles Straley of the 3600 block of Conowingo Road in Street was fox hunting in the Owings Mills area when he was stopped by Officer David Robertson of the Maryland Natural Resources Police about 4 p.m. near Dolfield and Pleasant Hill roads.Officer Robertson said the hunter failed several field sobriety tests.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Howard Arthur "Hound Dog" Brown, an Eastern Shore huntsman who bred foxhounds, was a fox hunter until his late 80s, when he switched from a horse to a pickup truck to continue his pursuit of the elusive prey. Mr. Brown, who was 96, died in his sleep April 22 at Chestertown Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. Mr. Brown was born in Baltimore and was raised in Reisterstown and Westminster. He attended Carroll County public schools until dropping out in the eighth grade. "He then began working with horses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2008
Hounded to Death by Rita Mae Brown Ballantine Books/Random House/304 pages/$25 The Sand Castle by Rita Mae Brown; Grove Press/Atlantic/112 pages/$18.95 On her Web site, Virginia horse farmer and mystery novelist Rita Mae Brown brings the verisimilitude of fox hunting to her Sister Jane Arnold mystery series, the latest addition to which is Hounded to Death. For those unfamiliar with the series, "Sister" Jane is in her 70s and breeds foxhounds and is, like Brown, a master of hounds.
NEWS
By Al Webb | September 27, 2004
ITS RAIL SYSTEM is described as the worst in Europe, Iraq hangs about like a vulture and the hospitals are breeding grounds for "super bugs," but what really has Britain's tights in a twist is the spectacle of folks with horses and hounds chasing small, furry animals across the countryside. "The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable," is how Oscar Wilde once described fox hunting. But more than a century after he coined that pithy aphorism, the ruction this singular activity still creates is proof that class warfare is alive and lurks as ever in Britain's green and usually pleasant land.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2002
THE CALL to the hunt is sounded on a crisp fall morning, and the hounds and riders of the Marlborough Hunt Club are off. For the next several hours, a group of formally attired riders will jump fences, cross streams and circle fields, chasing the hounds that chase the fox. Although their black coats and shining boots may appear fancy, the riders must be nimble enough to keep up with one of the three groups. This is not a sport for the faint-hearted. "It is all a game. Here in America, we do not kill the fox, we are technically `fox chasing,'" says Katherine Cawood of West River, one of three hunt masters for the 125-member club.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2002
Since the days of George Washington, horses and hounds have chased foxes across the fields of Howard County. On Saturday, the 59th Iron Bridge Race Meet will celebrate the county's fox-hunting traditions - and the opening of Maryland's tradition-laden, spring steeplechase season - with a day of timber races, flat races and children's pony races over tiny jumps. At Meriwether Farm in Glenelg, the meet will feature six races over jumps, four on the flat turf, and the pony races, with small- , medium- and large-pony divisions.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
QUEPONCO - Last week's thaw didn't seem much like fox-hunting weather, but you'd never know it watching two dozen members of the Wicomico Hunt Club on horseback chasing a noisy pack of hounds over flat fields of corn and soybean stubble and slogging down logging roads and trails in the woods. Some burned up precious vacation time; some are lucky enough to work Ocean City resort jobs with reduced hours during the off-season. Others are self-employed or retired, their time their own. However they manage it, every Wednesday and Sunday from Thanksgiving to Easter, come rain, snow - or, worse yet, temperatures in the 70s - hard-core fox hunters will be following the hounds.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | November 21, 1990
It's a thrilling spectacle - first the pack of hounds, noses to the ground, eagerly sniffing for their prey. Then the huntsman and the whippers-in, their scarlet jackets a brilliant contrast to fading autumn foliage.Against the dazzling blue of a perfect November sky, the red-coated masters of the hunt appear, proudly erect in the saddle. Close behind follow mounted hunters, sedately clad in traditional black and white.Even the sounds are magical -- the eager baying of the dogs, the cry of the huntsman's horn, the clop of horses' hooves.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
QUEPONCO - Last week's thaw didn't seem much like fox-hunting weather, but you'd never know it watching two dozen members of the Wicomico Hunt Club on horseback chasing a noisy pack of hounds over flat fields of corn and soybean stubble and slogging down logging roads and trails in the woods. Some burned up precious vacation time; some are lucky enough to work Ocean City resort jobs with reduced hours during the off-season. Others are self-employed or retired, their time their own. However they manage it, every Wednesday and Sunday from Thanksgiving to Easter, come rain, snow - or, worse yet, temperatures in the 70s - hard-core fox hunters will be following the hounds.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
After being caught in a bureaucratic thicket for nearly a year, Howard County's fox hunters are finally breaking into the clear. The county Planning Board recommended yesterday zoning approval for the Howard County-Iron Bridge Hounds, a 70-year-old fox-hunting club based on a 100-acre parcel in the western part of the county. The vote helped put to rest the club's run-in with county officials who discovered last summer that the club had built a clubhouse without the required permits. Club officials initially argued that they didn't need formal approval for the clubhouse - which includes a full bar and kitchen - because it was incidental to the "farming operation" at the Windsor Forest Road property.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 18, 2001
LONDON - Bringing along the spare hound or horse, the tweed-wearing, tea-drinking, folk-singing heart of Middle England converged on the House of Commons yesterday for the longest-running shaggy fox story in British politics. Scores of well-heeled and well-behaved demonstrators arrived to stand up for their right to ride to the hounds and keep alive the age-old blood sport of fox hunting. "It's the country vs. the city," said Richard Thomson-Moore, 22, an agricultural student standing by his 12-year-old golden Labrador named Midas, who was asleep on a bale of hay as horn-blowing cars rumbled by. The dog may not have taken much notice, but the city won, as the House of Commons voted overwhelmingly to bar hunting with dogs.
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