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By Stephen Battaglio and Donna Parker and Stephen Battaglio and Donna Parker,The Hollywood Reporter | August 22, 1994
Fox Broadcasting Co. has decided against running its TV movie on O. J. Simpson before he stands trial for the murder of his ex-wife Nicole and her friend Ronald Goldman.Sources close to the network said Fox Inc. chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch made the decision to delay the broadcast based on concern that it could make it difficult for Mr. Simpson to get a fair trial.Fox had set the TV movie to kick off its new Tuesday night movie slate on Sept. 13, one week before Mr. Simpson is scheduled to stand trial on charges of first-degree murder.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
There was lots of mail on the Fox telecast of the Ravens' epic win Sunday over the Vikings. In the interest of getting more reader reaction into this post, I'll keep my words to a minimum. I'll try anyway. I've noticed the "Z responds" part is sometimes longer than that to which I am responding. What can I say? Let's start with Kitty, who writes: Dear Z, I thoroughly enjoy your column in the Sun.  I must comment on the last 4 paragraphs of your column today (12/9/13).  I am a FiOS customer and was totally frustrated by the audio of Sunday's game.  As you described, I heard no sound, then English, Spanish, English, etc. for the entire 1st half.   I thought something was wrong with my TV.   You seem to have enjoyed Fox's coverage, but a graphic on the screen explaining the audio difficulties would have been greatly appreciated.  I listened to WBAL , which was difficult as they are a few minutes ahead of the video.  I would have loved to have heard from Hale, Myers, and Ryan on the broadcasting team, but I COULDN'T UNDERSTAND anything being said!
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The morning after the demise of the CBS-QVC merger, Rupert Murdoch, the chairman of Fox Inc., trumpeted Fox Broadcasting's strides in the television industry and derided the programming of CBS as "getting pretty tired."While CBS remains the ratings leader in prime time, the network "needs a more expansionary business view," Mr. Murdoch said. "They have real problems on their program schedule."Though the Fox network is in fourth place in the ratings, Mr. Murdoch contended that it had achieved parity with CBS, ABC and NBC, citing as evidence the increased payments he said those networks were making to their affiliated stations to keep them from fleeing to Fox."
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s stock fell 23 percent yesterday on concerns over Fox Broadcasting Co.'s plan to take over prime time commercial spots from its television affiliates, including 20 stations owned by Sinclair.As the largest owner of Fox stations outside of Fox itself, the Baltimore company could lose the most from the plan, which was delivered to Sinclair on Wednesday.Sinclair's stock lost $3.3125, closing at $11.0625.According to Sinclair, the plan calls for it and other affiliates to give up 20 prime time commercial spots per week to Fox.The affiliates may buy the spots back for $10 million per year, less than what they would cost on the open market.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 8, 1992
Fox Broadcasting is going to make the summer TV season a hotly contested one.The fourth network yesterday announced that it will expand to six nights of first-run, prime-time programming July 1 with the debut of "Melrose Place," a twentysomething ensemble drama from the producers of "Beverly Hills, 90210.""It is the kind of show viewers can't find on any other network," Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin said yesterday. "It's a look at today's twentysomething generation . . . coming of age and on their own for the first time."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 8, 1992
Fox Broadcasting is going to make the summer TV season a hotly contested one.The fourth network yesterday announced that it will expand to six nights of first-run, prime-time programming July 1 with the debut of "Melrose Place," a twentysomething ensemble drama from the producers of "Beverly Hills, 90210.""It is the kind of show viewers can't find on any other network," Fox Entertainment President Peter Chernin said yesterday. "It's a look at today's twentysomething generation . . . coming of age and on their own for the first time."
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s stock fell 23 percent yesterday on concerns over Fox Broadcasting Co.'s plan to take over prime time commercial spots from its television affiliates, including 20 stations owned by Sinclair.As the largest owner of Fox stations outside of Fox itself, the Baltimore company could lose the most from the plan, which was delivered to Sinclair on Wednesday.Sinclair's stock lost $3.3125, closing at $11.0625.According to Sinclair, the plan calls for it and other affiliates to give up 20 prime time commercial spots per week to Fox.The affiliates may buy the spots back for $10 million per year, less than what they would cost on the open market.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
"Trying to keep the clothes pressed has been a little bit of a problem. I look a little more wrinkled than most good Republicans -- more like a news reporter."-- Jay Wolfe of Clarksburg, W.Va., who was staying at a campground with his family while attending the convention."I was nervous. I had to use a little psychology on myself. I tried to pretend I was just talking to the Arkansas delegation and my husband."-- Christene Brownlee, an Arkansas delegate who as assistant secretary of the convention was assigned to repeat the delegate totals for each state during the roll call.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1994
The prime-time ratings for this TV season were the worst in years. And the schedule for next year is filled with no-names.But no one seemed to notice that yesterday, as Fox Broadcasting unveiled its 1994-'95 prime-time schedule for advertisers in New York.The main reason no one noticed, of course, is the thunderbolt of momentum the fourth network is riding after its announcement Monday that it will be adding 12 affiliates to its roster -- eight of the biggest ones coming out of the hide of CBS, which lost NFL football to Fox in December.
FEATURES
By Rick Du Brow and Rick Du Brow,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 1992
Hollywood -- When the Fox Broadcasting Co. named Chevy Chase last week as its late-night host starting next year, it took a major step toward recognition as a full-fledged TV network.Despite such hits as "The Simpsons" and "Married . . . With Children," Fox has been sorely lacking in two areas that help define a network: a news department and a late-night presence. It has recently stepped up its development of a news division as well for its 137 stations.With its proven ability to upset TV's powers-that-be -- it outbid the Big Three networks for the Emmy Awards and counter-programmed "The Cosby Show" with "The Simpsons" -- Fox coolly lobbed its contender into the competition to succeed the retiring Johnny Carson as king of the midnight hour.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
A Westminster man who struck a deal with Fox Broadcasting Co. to market a "Best of the 20th Century" national survey is suing Fox, its parent company and an Atlanta marketing firm for $600 million, claiming that he was forced out of the project.In 1994, Benjamin H. Higgs developed the idea for a national survey that would allow people to choose the best of the century in hundreds of categories, including sports, movies, music and Supreme Court justices.Fox's parent company, News Corp., agreed in December to provide the 900-prefix numbers for telephone voting, inserts in newspapers and a Web site for "The Best of the 20th Century: The Official National Survey."
BUSINESS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
Johnny Unitas or Joe Montana?"Gone With the Wind" or "Schindler's List"?Eubie Blake or Louis Armstrong?Thurgood Marshall or Oliver Wendell Holmes?Ben Higgs wants you to decide. The Westminster resident has crafted a national survey that, with help from Fox Broadcasting and corporate sponsors, will blanket America with ballots asking people to choose the best of the century in just about every category imaginable, from sports to film to music to Supreme Court justices.Higgs admits he's no marketing genius.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 13, 1996
In his playing days, former first baseman/outfielder Steve Lyons once dropped his pants at first base in the middle of a game to shake out loose pebbles, and he often would scratch out a tic-tac-toe board on the dirt for a friendly game with the opposition's first baseman.Not surprisingly, Lyons was affectionately known as "Psycho," and with all that as background, Orioles fans probably should take his pronouncements with, well, a grain of sand, but the Fox studio analyst is quite high on the Orioles' chances to get into the postseason.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 31, 1995
All of the television news images you've seen 1,000 times since O.J. Simpson was charged with murder, you will see once more at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45) when Fox airs "The O.J. Simpson Story."The "Sugarland Express" escort for the white Ford Bronco, the blood-spattered walkway leading to the Brentwood condo, the baseball bat taken to the windshield of Nicole Brown Simpson's sports car -- they are all in this made-for-TV movie."The O.J. Simpson Story" makes "The Amy Fisher Story" look like a Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Battaglio and Donna Parker and Stephen Battaglio and Donna Parker,The Hollywood Reporter | August 22, 1994
Fox Broadcasting Co. has decided against running its TV movie on O. J. Simpson before he stands trial for the murder of his ex-wife Nicole and her friend Ronald Goldman.Sources close to the network said Fox Inc. chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch made the decision to delay the broadcast based on concern that it could make it difficult for Mr. Simpson to get a fair trial.Fox had set the TV movie to kick off its new Tuesday night movie slate on Sept. 13, one week before Mr. Simpson is scheduled to stand trial on charges of first-degree murder.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The morning after the demise of the CBS-QVC merger, Rupert Murdoch, the chairman of Fox Inc., trumpeted Fox Broadcasting's strides in the television industry and derided the programming of CBS as "getting pretty tired."While CBS remains the ratings leader in prime time, the network "needs a more expansionary business view," Mr. Murdoch said. "They have real problems on their program schedule."Though the Fox network is in fourth place in the ratings, Mr. Murdoch contended that it had achieved parity with CBS, ABC and NBC, citing as evidence the increased payments he said those networks were making to their affiliated stations to keep them from fleeing to Fox."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 31, 1995
All of the television news images you've seen 1,000 times since O.J. Simpson was charged with murder, you will see once more at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45) when Fox airs "The O.J. Simpson Story."The "Sugarland Express" escort for the white Ford Bronco, the blood-spattered walkway leading to the Brentwood condo, the baseball bat taken to the windshield of Nicole Brown Simpson's sports car -- they are all in this made-for-TV movie."The O.J. Simpson Story" makes "The Amy Fisher Story" look like a Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation.
FEATURES
By Rick Du Brow and Rick Du Brow,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 1992
When the Fox Broadcasting Co. named Chevy Chase this week as its late-night host starting next year, it took a major step toward recognition as a full-fledged TV network.Despite such hits as "The Simpsons" and "Married . . . With Children," Fox has been sorely lacking in two areas that help define a network: a news department and a late-night presence. It has recently stepped up its development of a news division as well for its 137 stations.With its proven ability to upset TV's powers-that-be -- it outbid the Big Three networks for the Emmy Awards and counter-programmed "The Cosby Show" with "The Simpsons" -- Fox coolly lobbed its contender into the competition to succeed the retiring Johnny Carson as king of the midnight hour.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 25, 1994
The prime-time ratings for this TV season were the worst in years. And the schedule for next year is filled with no-names.But no one seemed to notice that yesterday, as Fox Broadcasting unveiled its 1994-'95 prime-time schedule for advertisers in New York.The main reason no one noticed, of course, is the thunderbolt of momentum the fourth network is riding after its announcement Monday that it will be adding 12 affiliates to its roster -- eight of the biggest ones coming out of the hide of CBS, which lost NFL football to Fox in December.
NEWS
August 21, 1992
"Trying to keep the clothes pressed has been a little bit of a problem. I look a little more wrinkled than most good Republicans -- more like a news reporter."-- Jay Wolfe of Clarksburg, W.Va., who was staying at a campground with his family while attending the convention."I was nervous. I had to use a little psychology on myself. I tried to pretend I was just talking to the Arkansas delegation and my husband."-- Christene Brownlee, an Arkansas delegate who as assistant secretary of the convention was assigned to repeat the delegate totals for each state during the roll call.
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