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By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Tradition won over athleticism last night, as Severna Park outlasted previously unbeaten Arundel, 3-2, for the Anne Arundel County volleyball championship at Meade High School. No. 5 Severna Park (11-4) won, 15-6, 10-15, 5-15, 16-14, 15-3. After a flat start, No. 3 Arundel (13-1) dominated the second and third sets but faltered in the crucial fourth set. "At the very end of the fourth set, I thought we were going to close it out, but it was like we blinked and lost momentum and never got it back," said Arundel coach Greg Legrand, whose Wildcats lost a 12-9 lead in that set. Severna Park rallied to take a 14-13 lead before Arundel tied it at 14. Facing defeat, the Falcons' Laura Hertzman served the last two points, including the game-winner at match point.
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By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Bethesda native Katie Ledecky came into Saturday's 800-meter freestyle final at the FINA World Championships with three gold medals and a 1,500 freestyle world record last week. On Saturday, she again was the swimmer to beat, and again, nobody was able to do it. Ledecky won her final swim in Barcelona, Spain, by adding her second world record of the meet, topping Rebecca Adlington's former mark set in 2008 with a time of 8 minutes, 13.86 seconds. "It's good to finish off on a great note," said Ledecky, who previously won the 400 free and 4x200 free relay.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
NEW YORK -- It's all about methodology to No. 1 seed Lleyton Hewitt. Go on court. Concentrate. Forehand. Backhand. Volley occasionally. Turn up the serve. Retrieve. Attack. Hewitt's focus at Arthur Ashe Stadium in the third round of the U.S. Open yesterday was mind-numbing. Just ask James Blake, the 22-year-old who has become the new darling of American tennis and was Hewitt's opponent in a rematch of their controversial five-setter of a year ago. "His game wears you down because he gets to so many balls," Blake said.
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carolepete@verizon.net | June 27, 2013
We have some great local swim clubs that are having lots of fun planning your Independence Day celebration. Padonia Park Club, 12006 Jenifer Road,offers a 101 day "staycation. " This is the pool where I am a member. "The activities are endless this year - I feel like I'm a cruise director" Kathy Angstadt, pool club CEO, said. "Like the cruise ship, we have many events going on at the same time. " Padonia Park's has as many as five events running concurrently. There is live music every Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Cabana.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1992
...TC PARIS -- Another one bites the dust. And in Jimmy Connors' case, the damage was literal yesterday afternoon at the French Open, where he followed the precedent set Tuesday by his contemporary, John McEnroe, and succumbed, with scraped knees, to a defeat that provoked a reverie on retirement.Spattered by the clay from Michael Stich's 26 aces, and shattered by the effort to outlast the Wimbledon champion in a five-set endurathon played in the height of the pre- summer swelter that has hit this city, Connors tried but failed to come out ahead in a 7-5, 3-6, 6-7 (4-7)
SPORTS
By Jim Sarni and Jim Sarni,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | June 2, 1991
PARIS -- Jimmy Connors lashed a backhand return for th break, and as he walked to his chair for the changeover, everyone at Stade Roland Garros stood up and roared.The noise didn't cease as Connors got up, poured water over his head to wash away the sweat and the tears, wrapped his face in a towel and returned to the court to serve out the fourth set against Michael Chang.Connors double-faulted to 15-30, but then ripped a forehand, and you could feel 17,000 hearts riding the ball into the open court.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber PTC and Bill Glauber PTC,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
NEW YORK -- Welcome to the U.S. slow-motion Open.Long lines. Longer matches. Lots of standing around and waiting for millionaire tennis players to towel off, pace, bounce the ball and serve.But every once in awhile they serve up a terrific match filled with passion and pathos.Last night, No. 4 seed Michael Chang needed five sets and 4 hours and 17 minutes to finish off a 20-year-old freckle-faced South African who looks like Doogie Howser and hits backhands like the Terminator.Chang outlasted Wayne Ferreira, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3, 6-7 (4-7)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
NEW YORK -- An unnerving calm came over Boris Becker yesterday. It was an unusual feeling for Becker to have going into a fourth-round match at the U.S. Open, and it seemed to carry over into the first two sets last night against Magnus Larsson of Sweden."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- Their story lines had been played out for the past week at the All England Club. While John McEnroe was reviving his legend, Jeremy Bates was becoming a British hero for the first time.It seemed for a while yesterday that McEnroe and Bates were headed for a quarterfinal showdown of Wimbledon long shots. ** McEnroe had beaten Russian qualifier Andrei Olhovskiy in three mostly grueling sets, and Bates was up two sets to one on Guy Forget of France.You could almost hear the presses starting to crank up on Fleet Street.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- Boris Becker slept fitfully Monday night, thinking about how he couldn't finish off Wayne Ferreira in the fourth set of their Round of 16 match, worrying about coming back for the fifth set the following afternoon to complete it.When Becker woke up to rainy skies yesterday morning, he knew he might be in for a long day. When the rain grew into a more than three-hour delay, the first prolonged bad weather break during this year's Wimbledon,...
SPORTS
By Liz Clarke and Liz Clarke,The Washington Post | August 6, 2009
WASHINGTON - -He was showered with applause before he even struck a ball. And Andy Roddick applauded in return, turning to all sides of the Stadium Court on Wednesday night to salute the tennis fans who were saluting him as he strode out for his first match since the heart-rending loss to Roger Federer at Wimbledon last month. Washingtonians will get another chance to cheer the top-ranked American, with Roddick sailing through his opening match at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic in 55 minutes - less time than it took him to play that arduous fifth and final set at Wimbledon.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 18, 2004
Ellicott City developer Michael L. Pfau withdrew last week his fourth set of house designs under review by Howard County's Historic District Commission, which must approve the plans before he can begin construction on a 15-home development in the town's historic district. At the developer's request, the commission scheduled an "advisory" meeting Jan. 28 to give Pfau -- president of Trinity Homes Inc. -- more direction on how he can modify the designs to meet the panel's guidelines. "I think it's been an incremental process," said Stephen Lafferty, deputy director of the county Department of Planning and Zoning.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Tradition won over athleticism last night, as Severna Park outlasted previously unbeaten Arundel, 3-2, for the Anne Arundel County volleyball championship at Meade High School. No. 5 Severna Park (11-4) won, 15-6, 10-15, 5-15, 16-14, 15-3. After a flat start, No. 3 Arundel (13-1) dominated the second and third sets but faltered in the crucial fourth set. "At the very end of the fourth set, I thought we were going to close it out, but it was like we blinked and lost momentum and never got it back," said Arundel coach Greg Legrand, whose Wildcats lost a 12-9 lead in that set. Severna Park rallied to take a 14-13 lead before Arundel tied it at 14. Facing defeat, the Falcons' Laura Hertzman served the last two points, including the game-winner at match point.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
NEW YORK - The criticism can stop now. Pete Sampras - who had dropped to the No. 17 seed, who had heard his play criticized, who had heard opposing players say he wasn't the player he used to be and should retire - that Pete Sampras won the U.S. Open yesterday. That Pete Sampras hit 84 winners. That Pete Sampras hit 33 aces. That Pete Sampras, 31, beat age-old foe Andre Agassi, 32, decisively, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4. Then, in an uncharacteristic display of emotion, Sampras left the court to climb through the crowd at the USTA National Tennis Center, high-fiving fans, receiving pats on the back and congratulations all along the way, to reach his wife, Bridgette Wilson-Sampras, who is pregnant with their first child.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
NEW YORK -- It's all about methodology to No. 1 seed Lleyton Hewitt. Go on court. Concentrate. Forehand. Backhand. Volley occasionally. Turn up the serve. Retrieve. Attack. Hewitt's focus at Arthur Ashe Stadium in the third round of the U.S. Open yesterday was mind-numbing. Just ask James Blake, the 22-year-old who has become the new darling of American tennis and was Hewitt's opponent in a rematch of their controversial five-setter of a year ago. "His game wears you down because he gets to so many balls," Blake said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
NEW YORK -- Patrick Rafter is only a year older than he was when he won his first U.S. Open, but yesterday, when he became only the sixth man in the modern era to defend an Open title successfully, his celebration was that of a veteran.There were no wild gestures. No sprint to his friends' box. No tears.This time, when Rafter's Australian compatriot, Mark Philippoussis, double-faulted on match point in the fourth set to hand him a 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-0 victory, Rafter simply smiled and walked to the net for a handshake and some back-patting.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- No defending U.S. Open champion has ever lost in the first round here -- but it was close last night.On the Arthur Ashe Stadium court, Patrick Rafter met the tricky, troublemaking Hicham Arazi, who forced the defending champ to five sets before bowing, 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1.It was an improvisational end to an otherwise status-quo day."A few things agitated me throughout the night, and I tried to make a point," Rafter said. "The ball wasn't responding the way I liked and my first volley wasn't going the way I wanted.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
NEW YORK - The criticism can stop now. Pete Sampras - who had dropped to the No. 17 seed, who had heard his play criticized, who had heard opposing players say he wasn't the player he used to be and should retire - that Pete Sampras won the U.S. Open yesterday. That Pete Sampras hit 84 winners. That Pete Sampras hit 33 aces. That Pete Sampras, 31, beat age-old foe Andre Agassi, 32, decisively, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4. Then, in an uncharacteristic display of emotion, Sampras left the court to climb through the crowd at the USTA National Tennis Center, high-fiving fans, receiving pats on the back and congratulations all along the way, to reach his wife, Bridgette Wilson-Sampras, who is pregnant with their first child.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1998
NEW YORK -- A huge storm rolled over the National Tennis Center yesterday afternoon, but by early evening young Russian Marat Safin suggested it had been little more powerful than No. 1 Pete Sampras, the man he had faced across the net on Arthur Ashe Stadium court."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- No defending U.S. Open champion has ever lost in the first round here -- but it was close last night.On the Arthur Ashe Stadium court, Patrick Rafter met the tricky, troublemaking Hicham Arazi, who forced the defending champ to five sets before bowing, 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1.It was an improvisational end to an otherwise status-quo day."A few things agitated me throughout the night, and I tried to make a point," Rafter said. "The ball wasn't responding the way I liked and my first volley wasn't going the way I wanted.
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