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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
Lisa Graff, an author who teaches children's literature at McDaniel College, can't read a map to save her life. She's terrible at crossword puzzles, has trouble telling her left hand from her right and uses far too many exclamation points. While she was growing up in California in the 1980s in the shadow of a brilliant older brother, young Lisa became convinced that she had no special talent. She thought of herself as utterly, unspectacularly average. But Graff must have been good at something, because she grew up to become a respected author of children's books: six for younger students and a seventh for teens under the pseudonym Isla Neal.
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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
For many students who took the Maryland School Assessments this year, parts of the math sections just didn't add up. Amid the rollout of new curriculums aligned with the more rigorous Common Core standards, pass rates on the Maryland School Assessments plunged, with this year marking the steepest drops in the test's history because of a dive in math scores. There was a good chance students in grades three through eight might not have recognized at least three concepts in which they were being asked to demonstrate mastery.
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NEWS
By GLENN GRAHAM and GLENN GRAHAM,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Throughout his childhood, Glenelg sophomore Chris Stinnett was getting into whatever his older stepbrother, Mike Hornzell, was doing. Mike, now a senior at UMBC, played baseball, so Chris played baseball. Mike got into basketball, so Chris gave it a try. The same for soccer. One sport - wrestling - stuck. Stinnett first took to the mat in the fourth grade after watching his brother's matches during his high school days at Howard. The sport now has Stinnett's complete attention, and it shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
Lisa Graff, an author who teaches children's literature at McDaniel College, can't read a map to save her life. She's terrible at crossword puzzles, has trouble telling her left hand from her right and uses far too many exclamation points. While she was growing up in California in the 1980s in the shadow of a brilliant older brother, young Lisa became convinced that she had no special talent. She thought of herself as utterly, unspectacularly average. But Graff must have been good at something, because she grew up to become a respected author of children's books: six for younger students and a seventh for teens under the pseudonym Isla Neal.
NEWS
October 29, 2000
The Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association held its fifth annual Carroll County Prevention & Life Safety Poster Contest awards program Oct. 21 for elementary-school children. At a reception for children and their parents, the committee, led by Debbie Gartrell-Kemp, presented awards to children who entered a poster. Winners honored were: Grand prize: first grade, Falesha Lewis from Charles Carroll Elementary; second grade, Christina Staines from Mount Airy Elementary; third grade, Shannon McHale from Sandymount Elementary; fourth grade, Nicholas Vidi from Winfield Elementary; fifth grade, Chris Schultz from Sandymount.
EXPLORE
December 30, 2011
Editor: I have two friends whose parents smoke. I feel really bad because it's hurting them more than their parents because they are only nine-year-old girls and more vulnerable than adults. I wish sometimes that I could just make their parents stop with a flick and a swish, but, I can't. So I think there should be a ban to protect kids and adults just the same who don't smoke and have the right to have smoke free air when they're in public. Alisha Kifer Fallston The writer is in fourth grade.
FEATURES
April 22, 1998
"'Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing,' by Judy Blume. This book has funny and interesting characters. My favorite characters are Peter and his little brother, Fudge. Peter feels like a fourth grade nothing because his little brother is so annoying and embarrassing that Peter can't make any friends."-- Christa Stramella, Grade 3Marley Elementary"One book I enjoyed was 'Marvelous Marvin and the Wolfman Mystery.' The author is Bonnie Pryor. It's about a boy named Marvin who thinks his neighbor is a wolfman.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
It was a traditional quilting bee in Hampstead. Needles i hand, quilters old and new clustered elbow to elbow to share hours of stories as they stitched.But this gathering was in teacher Jan Van Bibber's art room at Spring Garden Elementary School. And it attracted Carroll County's master quilt-makers, who cheerfully joined fourth-grade novices at the quilting frame.The 10- and 11-year-olds have designed a white-on-white spread -- the champagne of quilt styles.Each new visitor brought history into the art room.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
Maryland schoolchildren are improving steadily in a national test of mathematical ability, but they have not matched that performance in reading, according to results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress released yesterday. Often called "America in miniature," Maryland closely followed national trends in the tests, which are given to a sampling of pupils in fourth grade and eighth grade. Mathematics performance improved in both grades in this year's test. But Maryland reading scores, though they rose modestly in the fourth grade, have been flat for eighth-graders since 1998.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
The fourth-graders signed words when their hands weren't linked together in friendship or occupied in a science lesson.Kjersti Wheeler, 9, and Andi Lentino, 10, have much in common. But because of one difference -- Andi needs special education -- the girls might never have met.Andi attends Carroll Springs School, the only one in Carroll County exclusively for special education. Kjersti attends fourth grade at Eldersburg Elementary School.Thursday, Andi and four of her classmates visited the Eldersburg fourth-graders for a lesson on the difference between solids, liquids and gases.
EXPLORE
December 30, 2011
Editor: I have two friends whose parents smoke. I feel really bad because it's hurting them more than their parents because they are only nine-year-old girls and more vulnerable than adults. I wish sometimes that I could just make their parents stop with a flick and a swish, but, I can't. So I think there should be a ban to protect kids and adults just the same who don't smoke and have the right to have smoke free air when they're in public. Alisha Kifer Fallston The writer is in fourth grade.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Many people view the role of school counselors mainly as providing emotional nurturing while supporting students in their goals and aspirations, says Gayle Cicero, the counseling coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools. And the thought of counselors working to ensure that federal No Child Left Behind goals are met or that schools steadily draw money for students to attend college would seem foreign to some. But today, Cicero says, the best guidance counselors work side by side with teachers to ensure that students excel as early as elementary school and continue to do so after graduating from high school.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 13, 2010
If you were a parent of a Los Angeles school child this year, instead of relying on mommy gossip, you could look up your child's possible third-grade teachers on a Los Angeles Times website and see which one was the most effective based on how his or her students performed on standardized tests. If the students went on to perform as expected in fourth grade, the "added value" of the third-grade teacher would be considered neutral. If the students performed better than expected in fourth grade, based on their third-grade scores, then the teacher clearly had been the reason – had been of "added value" - and might even expect a bonus.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 17, 2007
Fourth-graders at Gamber's Mechanicsville Elementary are the first group in the Carroll County school system to report a 100 percent pass rate on the reading and math tests of the Maryland School Assessment, according to results released from the State Department of Education. "Obviously, we're very, very proud of the staff and students," said the school's principal, Robin Townsend. "If one grade can do it, our hope is third and fifth can, also." Test scores rose at schools throughout the county, with slight decreases only in fifth-grade reading and third-grade math.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2006
Susan J. Healy topped off a meal of Chinese food last week with the requisite fortune cookie. Healy, one of 10 finalists for county Teacher of the Year, broke open the cookie and extracted a fortune that read: "You will be recognized and honored as a community leader." The fourth-grade teacher at North Bend Elementary School in Jarrettsville had not planned to prepare an acceptance speech in case she won, but that little dessert made her think twice. As it turned out, Healy was named 2006-2007 Harford County Teacher of the Year at a banquet in Havre de Grace on Thursday night.
NEWS
By GLENN GRAHAM and GLENN GRAHAM,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Throughout his childhood, Glenelg sophomore Chris Stinnett was getting into whatever his older stepbrother, Mike Hornzell, was doing. Mike, now a senior at UMBC, played baseball, so Chris played baseball. Mike got into basketball, so Chris gave it a try. The same for soccer. One sport - wrestling - stuck. Stinnett first took to the mat in the fourth grade after watching his brother's matches during his high school days at Howard. The sport now has Stinnett's complete attention, and it shows.
NEWS
December 6, 1992
Robert Lidke named worker of the monthCable 15 producer and manager Robert Lidke has been named Harford County Government Employee of the Month for December.He will receive a plaque, a county government pin and a proclamation.Nominated by Stephen Naughton, Mr. Lidke was recognized for his work with community groups and his efforts to curtail government spending.ZTC He helped several county agencies, community groups and the Harford County Board of Education by producing videos and cable broadcasts.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Two years after Howard County schools Superintendent John R. O'Rourke demanded a plan be put in place for every one of the district's third-graders who was behind in reading or math, teachers have produced data to show system officials whether O'Rourke's big idea made a difference. The verdict: For about 25 percent of them, at least, it did. A report released to the Howard Board of Education last night showed that of 597 third-graders who were reading below grade level during the 2000-2001 school year, 28 percent of girls had moved up to fourth-grade level by the end of this year, and 1 percent were reading above fourth-grade level.
NEWS
By Ed Burns | May 19, 2004
IF YOU WANT to know about the corner murderers and their victims in Baltimore, don't ask a cop, ask a teacher. Sure, a cop can take you under the yellow tape, read a name off the toe tag. She can even pull up the suspect's rap sheet and review the list of adult and juvenile arrests. In some cases, she might be able to tell you what inanity passed for a motive in the killing that became the latest addition to the murder board. But when you've digested all the information, you still don't have much of a picture about the pedigree of the killers or the killed.
NEWS
May 5, 2004
County students make their moves at chess competition Nearly 50 elementary, middle and high school students competed Saturday in the fourth chess tournament sponsored by the Council of Elders of the Black Community in Howard County and the Black Student Achievement Program, held at Long Reach High School. Since January 2001, the Council of Elders has offered a chess program, primarily for African-American students in Howard County. Council members and community volunteers have provided weekly chess tutoring sessions for more than 600 pupils with varying skill levels.
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