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Fourth District

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NEWS
August 1, 1991
For decades, West Baltimore's Fourth District was famous for its factional politics and dogfights that produced hordes of candidates tearing one another apart during election campaigns.All that now seems to be just a memory. The politically active black middle-class is moving out of the city, the godfathers are gone: Sen. Verda F. Welcome is dead, Sen. Troy Brailey was retired by voters and the aging William L. "Little Willie" Adams is more interested in lucrative business deals than sponsoring candidates.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
Of the three incumbents seeking re-election to the Baltimore County Council, Kenneth N. Oliver might be facing the toughest primary battle. Six Democratic opponents are working to unseat the two-term councilman. They are campaigning on how to spur economic development, improve schools and enhance public safety. Oliver is running on what he has done for constituents. With no Republican candidate in the race, the tight Democratic primary will likely determine who represents the district that includes Woodlawn, Randallstown, Owings Mills and Reisterstown.
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NEWS
August 31, 1995
It is said that the most consistent voters in the Fourth District, which straddles Baltimore's west side, are at least 70 years old. That certainly would explain the popularity of septuagenarian Agnes B. Welch, who is seeking her fourth term on the City Council. But the people who live in the district could do better, and should.It's not that Mrs. Welch has lost her fervor to serve the people. But some other candidates in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary are more capable of delivering the goods.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
It is said that the most consistent voters in the Fourth District, which straddles Baltimore's west side, are at least 70 years old. That certainly would explain the popularity of septuagenarian Agnes B. Welch, who is seeking her fourth term on the City Council. But the people who live in the district could do better, and should.It's not that Mrs. Welch has lost her fervor to serve the people. But some other candidates in the Sept. 12 Democratic primary are more capable of delivering the goods.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Anyone who thinks Baltimore's population and property tax base are shrinking solely due to the exodus of the white middle class need only look at the Fourth District to be proved wrong. Block upon block of West Baltimore row houses, which once were the pride of the city's black lawyers and doctors, teachers and letter carriers, are showing the signs of neglect and abandonment.As the black middle class moves out of the city, once vibrant institutions deteriorate. On the border of the district on Druid Hill Avenue, the Mitchell family law office that once was a beehive of civil rights activism now is selling bail bonds.
NEWS
October 26, 1990
Ronald B. Hickernell, a three-term incumbent, has earned re-election in the First District. Berchie Manley, the Republican candidate, expresses valid concerns about overdevelopment but shows a dim understanding of the county's complex problems.In the Second District, Republican George W. Murphy has launched a strong challenge against Melvin G. Mintz, the incumbent. Mr. Mintz is the better of the two, but he ought to pay attention to concerns of the populous Liberty Road corridor.Third District Councilman C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger deserves another term.
NEWS
By MARTIN C. EVANS | February 17, 1991
ON JANUARY 28, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke unveiled his proposal for re-drawing the political map that determines the voting districts in Baltimore City.In fulfilling a responsibility demanded of him by the City Charter, the mayor did something that he finds personally distasteful, shaking together two reagents that have been among the most explosive components of American society: race and politics.Mr. Schmoke's plan involves few changes from the map created under former Mayor William Donald Schaefer by the redistricting of 1983, a redistricting that made mostly minor changes from the map that evolved in 1971.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | November 11, 1990
A year ago, Charles I. Ecker was a neophyte Republican trying to decide whether to accept his new party's invitation to run against a seemingly invincible incumbent.Today, Ecker, 61, is county executive-elect, having won on election night by a 244-vote margin, 25,637 to 25,393. Thursday, he widened that margin to 450 votes after absentee ballots were counted. He won 873 of the absentees to incumbent M. Elizabeth Bobo's 667.Ironically, a strategy first thought up by Democrat James B. Kraft, a loser in the 14-B delegate race, may have backfired.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | August 26, 1991
Havre de Grace. -- Having been away from Maryland politics for a while, I'm trying to brush up on the details and get back into the loop, as the corporate folks say. The following notes, jotted down to remind me who's who, are no doubt naive and sketchy. Reader assistance in filling them out would be welcome.Let's start with the governor, whom I still think of as the mayor. I gather that since people have stopped telling him how wonderful he is all the time, he's even madder at the world than he used to be. He leaves office whether he wants to or not in three more years.
NEWS
September 11, 1994
The Sun's makes the following recomendations for Tuesday's primary election. Our reasons for these endorsements have been explained in previous editorials during the past six weeks.Candidates who are unopposed for their party's nomination will not be listed on the primary election ballot, and thus are not listed here.RF You may clip this list and take it with you into the voting booth.GOVERNORHelen D. Bentley (R)( Parris N. Glendening (D)Attorney General$ Eleanor M. Carey (D)ComptrollerRichard P. Taylor (R)
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
As he rose to bid his colleagues on the Baltimore City Council farewell, Timothy D. Murphy reminisced about the good times, told a few jokes and left with a plain admonishment."
NEWS
September 12, 1994
The Evening Sun makes the following recomendations for Tuesday's primary election. Our reasons for these endorsements have been explained in previous editorials during the past six weeks.Candidates who are unopposed for their party's nomination will not be listed on the primary election ballot, and thus are not listed here.RF You may clip this list and take it with you into the voting booth.GOVERNORHelen D. Bentley (R)( Parris N. Glendening (D)Attorney General$ Eleanor M. Carey (D)ComptrollerRichard P. Taylor (R)
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | September 8, 1991
In 1987, the 4th District council race was one of the hottest in the city, with 17 candidates promising to deliver swift constituent service and to stand strong for policies that would help alleviate West Baltimore's disproportionate burden of urban problems.But this year, the political climate in the 4th District has barely reached lukewarm with fewer candidates running for office than in any other district.Only three challengers are seeking to unseat incumbents Sheila Dixon, Lawrence A. Bell and Agnes B. Welch.
NEWS
September 8, 1991
DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY*Lawrence A. BellAge: 29Neighborhood: Mondawmin.Occupation: City councilman.Education: University of Maryland, College Park, B.A., government and politics, 1983.Experience in community groups, activities: Life member, Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; board member, Brotherhood Outreach, Progressive Horizons; member, Baltimore chapter of the National Urban League, HUB black business organization, Mondawmin Neighborhood Improvement Association, Parkview Neighborhood Improvement Association; on the City Council, chairman of Executive Appointments Committee, vice chairman of Housing Committee, member of Budget and Appropriations, Judiciary, Education, and Policy and Planning committees.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | August 26, 1991
Havre de Grace. -- Having been away from Maryland politics for a while, I'm trying to brush up on the details and get back into the loop, as the corporate folks say. The following notes, jotted down to remind me who's who, are no doubt naive and sketchy. Reader assistance in filling them out would be welcome.Let's start with the governor, whom I still think of as the mayor. I gather that since people have stopped telling him how wonderful he is all the time, he's even madder at the world than he used to be. He leaves office whether he wants to or not in three more years.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Anyone who thinks Baltimore's population and property tax base are shrinking solely due to the exodus of the white middle class need only look at the Fourth District to be proved wrong. Block upon block of West Baltimore row houses, which once were the pride of the city's black lawyers and doctors, teachers and letter carriers, are showing the signs of neglect and abandonment.As the black middle class moves out of the city, once vibrant institutions deteriorate. On the border of the district on Druid Hill Avenue, the Mitchell family law office that once was a beehive of civil rights activism now is selling bail bonds.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
As he rose to bid his colleagues on the Baltimore City Council farewell, Timothy D. Murphy reminisced about the good times, told a few jokes and left with a plain admonishment."
NEWS
August 1, 1991
For decades, West Baltimore's Fourth District was famous for its factional politics and dogfights that produced hordes of candidates tearing one another apart during election campaigns.All that now seems to be just a memory. The politically active black middle-class is moving out of the city, the godfathers are gone: Sen. Verda F. Welcome is dead, Sen. Troy Brailey was retired by voters and the aging William L. "Little Willie" Adams is more interested in lucrative business deals than sponsoring candidates.
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