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Four Years

SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - At times, he looks like the player whose style, a mix of grace and power, drew realistic comparisons to Michael Jordan. At times, he looks like a cheap replica, trying to chip away the layers of rust that accumulated over the past four years. Grant Hill is 32, no longer the young deer he was at Duke or the dazzling star he became during his six seasons with the Detroit Pistons, a two-time first-team and four-time second-team All-NBA player. He is also, at least on first glance, not the oft-injured athlete whose career appeared to be over.
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SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
Indianapolis Colts receiver Brandon Stokley's career has ele- vated since he left the Ravens after the 2002 season, a fact most directly attributed to his health. Though questionable for tomorrow's game against the Ravens with a groin injury, Stokley has yet to miss one this season. He has 58 catches for 936 yards and nine touchdowns, all career highs. Those numbers though, have not gone to his head. Always one of the most humble players through his first four seasons with the Ravens, Stokley passed at the chance to take a swipe against his former team.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
A 21-year-old Pasadena man pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter Thursday for shoving a stranger who couldn't swim into the Inner Harbor in 2008 — an act previously characterized by one Baltimore judge as complete stupidity. Wayne Black, who was 18 when he pushed 22-year-old Ankush Gupta into the water and ran, will be sentenced to four years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Aug. 30, per an agreement cut with Baltimore Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock. His mother dabbed tears from her eyes as the deal was done, while Gupta's friends and family sat stone-faced on the other side of the courtroom.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
He has frequent lapses of memory, the result of a brain aneurysm he suffered as a teen in 1972. He struggled for years to keep jobs at BWI, at a discount store and in an industrial park. And finally, after his mother died in a Baltimore County nursing home, Fred Schaefle of Glen Burnie lost the condo in which he'd been living and ended up in a tent. "There's so much you don't appreciate until you don't have it," says the rangy, bearded 58-year-old with a shake of the head. "For example, indoor plumbing or a place to warm your food.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 29, 2000
A Parkton man was sentenced yesterday to four years in prison after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting a 7-year-old girl during a three-month period in 1998, court records in Carroll County showed. Robert George Naylor, 64, was living in Carroll County at the time. Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. imposed a 10-year prison term before suspending all but four years. Upon his release, Naylor will be on five years' probation. He must have no contact with any female younger than age 18, must register as a sexual offender and participate in any ordered counseling.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
A former Dundalk high school teacher who sexually assaulted a 13-year-old girl he met on the Internet on New Year's Day was sentenced yesterday to four years in prison for a crime a Howard County judge called "every suburban parent's worst nightmare." As a teacher, Charles Levi Maxwell, an admitted sex addict, must have recognized that he was dealing with a minor, said Howard Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney. But instead of calling off their meeting in Ellicott City, Maxwell decided to "proceed ahead and charge ahead," even making plans to meet her again a few days later, Sweeney said.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1990
The pool of voters registered for tomorrow's primary elections in Maryland will be more Republican, more suburban and smaller than the pool registered for primary day four years ago.The number of registered voters has shrunk by more than 33,000 voters since 1986. The largest loss was in Baltimore, where 321,142 people are registered, compared with 393,737 in 1986.Four years ago, Baltimore had the highest number of registered voters of any of the state's 24 local jurisdictions. This year, it will rank third, behind Montgomery County, which gained voters, and Baltimore County, which lost almost 5,000 voters, but still has 344,963 registered.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
4.3 Average goals allowed by the Glenelg boys lacrosse team in its 12-0 regular season. The defending Class 3A-2A state champion Gladiators are led by second-team All-Metro senior goalie Jon Selfridge, who has started all four years. While yielding just 4.3 goals, the Gladiators have produced 11.5 per game. 258 Career points recorded by Glenelg senior lacrosse standout Kristy Black, who became the program's all-time leader in the Gladiators' 22-6 win over Reservoir. Black, who scored four goals and added an assist in the win, went into yesterday's county championship game with 147 goals and 111 assists in her four years.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2000
Like many college freshmen, James Bond expected to graduate from University of Maryland in four years. But then he decided to take on a double major, studying government and journalism. To do it in four years, he would have needed 17 or 18 credits a semester instead of the typical 12 to 15. He worried his grades would suffer, hurting his chances when he applies to law schools. Now he is in his fifth year. And Bond - whose less-frantic schedule gives him time to serve as president of the student body, work at Student Legal Aid and take upper-level Spanish classes, among other activities - doesn't mind at all. "I'm getting so much more out of the college experience," said Bond, 22, of Silver Spring, who is among the growing number of college students nationwide who, out of choice or necessity, are extending their stay on campuses beyond the traditional four years.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 25, 1991
Four years ago, Kurt L. Schmoke ran for mayor of Baltimore as That Nice Young Man. Kurt, Kurt, you wanted to say. Loosen up! Undo your necktie! Call somebody a bad name!Instead, he campaigned on a platform of self-conscious politeness. And it nearly cost him his future.Everybody says it's going to be different this time around. They say he fought with his hands tied four years ago. The newspaper polls showed him running far ahead of Du Burns, but private polls showed him in trouble with elderly black voters who wanted reassurance.
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