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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Advocates of an old idea unveiled new tactics yesterday to try to re-create their vision of the citizen legislature of yore.U.S. Term Limits, a national lobby, said it would use TV ads to target four Republican members of Congress for supporting term limits more generous to officeholders than those mandated by the laws of their own states. Other targets are being considered, the lobby said.The TV ads follow a poster recently issued by the lobby that showed photos of nine former members of Congress who were defeated in November because, a lobby spokeswoman said, they opposed limits on congressional terms.
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NEWS
By GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS and GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Republican members of the Senate Intelligence Committee defeated yesterday a Democratic push to investigate a domestic espionage operation authorized by President Bush, but they vowed to increase scrutiny of the controversial program through a newly created subcommittee. The developments enraged Democrats but delivered mixed results for the White House, which avoided a full-scale investigation of the spying operation by agreeing to provide detailed briefings on the program to a larger number of lawmakers, according to Senate Republicans.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Advocates of an old idea unveiled new tactics yesterday to try to re-create their vision of the citizen legislature of yore.U.S. Term Limits, a national lobby, said it would use TV ads to target four Republican members of Congress for supporting term limits more generous to officeholders than those mandated by the laws of their own states. Other targets are being considered, the lobby said.The TV ads follow a poster recently issued by the lobby that showed photos of nine former members of Congress who were defeated in November because, a lobby spokeswoman said, they opposed limits on congressional terms.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Opponents of an Arab company's takeover of some operations at Baltimore and five other U.S. seaports vowed yesterday to keep fighting the deal, despite the company's offer to postpone the move. Even as the Bush administration welcomed the chance to spend more time trying to explain why it approved the sale of a British company to state-owned Dubai Ports World, politicians in both parties said a delay is meaningless unless they get the answers they want. New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez, a Democrat and one of the chief critics of the deal, called the company's offer to proceed with the sale but stay out of operations in the affected American ports "a smokescreen."
NEWS
By Pat Gilbert and Pat Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
I. William "Billy" Chase, a candidate for Baltimore County Council in the 3rd District, stood outside the Hunt Valley Giant supermarket handing out campaign literature as customers came out. There were farmers, young professionals, senior citizens and a few people who got into expensive cars."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House voted overwhelmingly last night to add a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, making good on perhaps the most far-reaching promise in the Republican "Contract with America."GOP members whooped for joy as the vote climbed to 300-132, 12 more than needed for the two-thirds majority. The measure now goes to the Senate, where it is expected to encounter lengthy delays but ultimately pass.The House vote marked a major victory for Speaker Newt Gingrich, although the Georgian and his new Republican majority lost a largely symbolic -- but highly visible -- battle to include a provision requiring a three-fifths majority to raise taxes rather than a simple majority.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS and GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Republican members of the Senate Intelligence Committee defeated yesterday a Democratic push to investigate a domestic espionage operation authorized by President Bush, but they vowed to increase scrutiny of the controversial program through a newly created subcommittee. The developments enraged Democrats but delivered mixed results for the White House, which avoided a full-scale investigation of the spying operation by agreeing to provide detailed briefings on the program to a larger number of lawmakers, according to Senate Republicans.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVARBARRY RASCOVAR | July 25, 1993
Are we about to witness civil war, Republican style? Are two ofthe Maryland Republican Party's best-known officials going to slug it out, toe-to-toe in an uncommon display of primary election candidate-bashing?Yes, the anemic state GOP is showing signs of life. By this time next year, Republicans could be watching a messy, rip-roaring heavyweight fight rivaling the Democrats' usual cut-and-thrust melee.And that's just for the primary. Wait till the November election campaign gears up.In most other states, such frenzied activity is routine.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
State Sen. John A. Cade's death yesterday cast a bipartisan (( pall over the Anne Arundel political community. It also opened a huge window of opportunity for ambitious local Republicans hoping to succeed the only state senator to represent the 33rd District.Anne Arundel's Republican Central Committee must nominate a successor to Cade, whose fiscal expertise earned him an insider's spot in the Democratic-controlled Senate, within the next 30 days.Gov. Parris N. Glendening is then required to approve the nominee, who will assume a seat made more prestigious by the gruff Republican leader who occupied it for 21 years.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- If Maryland voters want to turn away from conventional politicians in this year's elections, they'll have plenty of choices in the congressional races.Among the contestants who emerged triumphant from the Sept. 15 primaries are a pager salesman who fancies himself a mystery writer, a drug abuse counselor and a farmer with a grudge against developers.Then there's Colin Felix Harby, a retired design engineer who was quaffing a beer at an Irish pub this summer while watching a political program on television, and decided to run against Baltimore-area Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- If Maryland voters want to turn away from conventional politicians in this year's elections, they'll have plenty of choices in the congressional races.Among the contestants who emerged triumphant from the Sept. 15 primaries are a pager salesman who fancies himself a mystery writer, a drug abuse counselor and a farmer with a grudge against developers.Then there's Colin Felix Harby, a retired design engineer who was quaffing a beer at an Irish pub this summer while watching a political program on television, and decided to run against Baltimore-area Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1998
Three first-time Republican candidates for seats on the Howard County Council are turning up the heat in what has so far been a calm -- some say boring -- election year.In District 4, which includes most of Columbia and Fulton, GOP newcomer Greg Fox has strengthened his bid to unseat Mary C. Lorsung by raising almost three times as much campaign money as the Democratic incumbent.In District 5, a western Howard Republican stronghold, GOP hopefuls Gail H. Bates and Allan Kittleman are taking on each other.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Endorsing a landmark compromise, the House overwhelmingly approved yesterday a balanced-budget bill that is widely popular because it inflicts little pain and offers the pleasure of much new spending.The lopsided tally of 346 to 85 marked final House action in a long-running saga that promises to deliver by 2002 the first balanced federal budget since 1969. The Senate's expected passage today will send the legislation to President Clinton, who is already planning the ceremony next week at which he will sign it into law.A separate bill, to dispense a wide range of tax cuts, will be voted on today.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
State Sen. John A. Cade's death yesterday cast a bipartisan (( pall over the Anne Arundel political community. It also opened a huge window of opportunity for ambitious local Republicans hoping to succeed the only state senator to represent the 33rd District.Anne Arundel's Republican Central Committee must nominate a successor to Cade, whose fiscal expertise earned him an insider's spot in the Democratic-controlled Senate, within the next 30 days.Gov. Parris N. Glendening is then required to approve the nominee, who will assume a seat made more prestigious by the gruff Republican leader who occupied it for 21 years.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Advocates of an old idea unveiled new tactics yesterday to try to re-create their vision of the citizen legislature of yore.U.S. Term Limits, a national lobby, said it would use TV ads to target four Republican members of Congress for supporting term limits more generous to officeholders than those mandated by the laws of their own states. Other targets are being considered, the lobby said.The TV ads follow a poster recently issued by the lobby that showed photos of nine former members of Congress who were defeated in November because, a lobby spokeswoman said, they opposed limits on congressional terms.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Advocates of an old idea unveiled new tactics yesterday to try to re-create their vision of the citizen legislature of yore.U.S. Term Limits, a national lobby, said it would use TV ads to target four Republican members of Congress for supporting term limits more generous to officeholders than those mandated by the laws of their own states. Other targets are being considered, the lobby said.The TV ads follow a poster recently issued by the lobby that showed photos of nine former members of Congress who were defeated in November because, a lobby spokeswoman said, they opposed limits on congressional terms.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Opponents of an Arab company's takeover of some operations at Baltimore and five other U.S. seaports vowed yesterday to keep fighting the deal, despite the company's offer to postpone the move. Even as the Bush administration welcomed the chance to spend more time trying to explain why it approved the sale of a British company to state-owned Dubai Ports World, politicians in both parties said a delay is meaningless unless they get the answers they want. New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez, a Democrat and one of the chief critics of the deal, called the company's offer to proceed with the sale but stay out of operations in the affected American ports "a smokescreen."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Endorsing a landmark compromise, the House overwhelmingly approved yesterday a balanced-budget bill that is widely popular because it inflicts little pain and offers the pleasure of much new spending.The lopsided tally of 346 to 85 marked final House action in a long-running saga that promises to deliver by 2002 the first balanced federal budget since 1969. The Senate's expected passage today will send the legislation to President Clinton, who is already planning the ceremony next week at which he will sign it into law.A separate bill, to dispense a wide range of tax cuts, will be voted on today.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The House voted overwhelmingly last night to add a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, making good on perhaps the most far-reaching promise in the Republican "Contract with America."GOP members whooped for joy as the vote climbed to 300-132, 12 more than needed for the two-thirds majority. The measure now goes to the Senate, where it is expected to encounter lengthy delays but ultimately pass.The House vote marked a major victory for Speaker Newt Gingrich, although the Georgian and his new Republican majority lost a largely symbolic -- but highly visible -- battle to include a provision requiring a three-fifths majority to raise taxes rather than a simple majority.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In the old -- Democratic -- world order, Maryland was well-represented in the power structure on Capitol Hill: Its senators and House members chaired subcommittees, were part of the leadership of Congress, and had clout and seniority enough to bring home a healthy fistful of federal dollars.But all that has changed.As the Republicans start dealing the cards, Maryland finds itself without any real power players at the table.Its four Republican representatives -- incumbents Constance A. Morella, Wayne T. Gilchrest, Roscoe G. Bartlett and freshman Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. -- are short on seniority and, in most cases, members of committees that are likely to be dismantled or abolished.
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