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NEWS
January 6, 1991
Services for Eugene H. Ryer, a retired vice president and general manager of the Lacy Foundries in Baltimore, were held yesterday in Southbury, Conn.Mr. Ryer, who moved from Glyndon to Southbury in 1973, died Monday at a hospital in Waterbury, Conn., after a short illness.He retired from the foundry in 1965. He had gone to work there in 1933 after completing his apprenticeship and working as a journeyman patternmaker elsewhere.After his retirement, he served in the International Executive Service Corps and advised companies in Mexico and South Korea.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Far from a tragedy, Foundry Row represents a great opportunity for the Owings Mills community ( "Suburban tragedy," Sept. 5). It will at least provide some well-paying jobs and revenue to help jump start the Owings Mills-Reisterstown area. Now if we could only get the old mall replaced with a Costco center like the one in Columbia. Stuart Hirsch, Reisterstown - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
June 4, 2002
Arnold F. Baltus, a retired foundry worker who enjoyed fishing and crabbing, died Friday of pulmonary failure at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. The longtime Overlea resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, Mr. Baltus was a graduate of the city's Vocational High School. In 1931, he began working at Flynn & Emich Foundry in Pimlico. An iron molder, he retired in 1975. He was a 44-year communicant of St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church in Overlea.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | June 17, 2014
The developers of the new $140 million, 50-acre Foundry Row shopping center in Owings Mills on Tuesday announced eight tenants for the complex. In addition to a previously announced Wegmans grocery store, the developers said tenants will include LA Fitness, Sports Authority, DSW, Panera Bread, Ulta, Zoe's Kitchen, Smashburger and Nalley Fresh. Construction began this spring on the Reisterstown Road center, which is located on the site of the former Solo Cup factory. The project, expected to open in 2016, is currently 70 percent leased.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | June 26, 1991
One of America's last two church bell makers wears high-top Reeboks,earrings and a beeper. And he worries about the future of the American church bell industry.In acid-washed jeans and gelled hair, William R. Parker III works with his father, William R. Parker Jr., at adying craft in a dusty foundry that is the McShane Bell Foundry Company Inc. in Glen Burnie. They are the only church bell makers left inthe United States."I don't know if there's going to be much demand for this in a couple of years," said Bill, the 22-year-old.
NEWS
February 7, 2005
J.P. Wade Levering, a retired foundry owner and yacht salesman, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at his Boca Grande, Fla., home. The former Ruxton resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, he attended the Gilman School and Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, N.J. In the 1930s he joined the family business, Levering Brothers, a Key Highway foundry, and rose to become president and chairman of the board. During World War II he served in the Coast Guard and in the merchant marine in the Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterranean.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | February 8, 2003
I HAD JUST fallen off to sleep on a drizzling September night in 1995 when I got a call from the city editor. A terrible fire had erupted at an ancient foundry in Woodberry, just below Television Hill. Could I, who lived in Charles Village, get through and phone in some details? And pronto. All I could now hear were fire engines wailing. And there was the ominous scent of dense heavy smoke that hangs when Baltimore has a bad fire. I dashed out into St. Paul Street, and with no cabs in sight, waved down a van crammed with parents and children.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Jacques Kelly and Anne Haddad and Jacques Kelly,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | September 17, 1995
An eight-alarm fire that seriously injured at least four 'u firefighters -- and possibly killed one -- demolished a massive, historic, one-time iron foundry in the Woodberry section of North Baltimore early today.The fire burned on a rainy night through the building in the 2000 block of Clipper Park Drive, in an 1860s-vintage stone building that once housed the Poole & Hunt Foundry. The complex is near the foot of the city's famed Television Hill, and in the valley of the Jones Falls near the Pepsi Cola sign that Jones Falls Expressway motorists have used as a landmark for years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
Joseph O. Danko Jr., chairman of Danko Arlington Inc., a family-owned Baltimore foundry and pattern and machine shop, and active parishioner of the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, died of cancer Saturday at his Homeland residence. He was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park, Mr. Danko was a 1944 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He joined the Navy and was sent to study at Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg in the service's V-12 accelerated officer training program.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1999
Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown took a company public yesterday whose shares leaped 525 percent, the largest first-day gain in an initial public offering this year.Shares of Foundry Networks Inc. closed at $156.25, up $131.25 after being priced by Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown at $25 a share. The company sold 5 million shares, a 9 percent stake.Foundry's shares started trading at 1: 45 p.m. on the Nasdaq stock market at $114 a share, although some traders using other electronic systems bought and sold shares at $109.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Developers of the Foundry Row retail project in Owings Mills say they are on track to start construction this summer on a $140 million shopping center featuring Baltimore County's second Wegmans grocery store. In an opinion issued this week, the county Board of Appeals upheld an administrative law judge's earlier decision to approve the development at the site of the former Solo Cup plant on Reisterstown Road. And Thursday, officials at Greenberg Gibbons, the center developer, said their company has settled a lawsuit that Solo Cup filed against it involving damage to energy plant equipment on the 50-acre property.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
With the swipe of an excavator, a demolition crew began taking down the abandoned Solo Cup factory in Owings Mills on Thursday, work that will clear the way for new development that was once threatened by opposition. When the abandoned plant is flattened, developers plan to build a $140 million shopping center anchored by the upscale grocer Wegmans, as well as a gym, restaurants, offices and stores. Developers say Foundry Row will open by late 2015 or early 2016. The ceremonial start to demolition at the site on the corner of Reisterstown and Painters Mill roads followed months of debate among residents, developers and Baltimore County Council members.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Raymond Ellis Thompson, a retired foundry worker active in the Oliver neighborhood, died of cancer Jan. 15 at his East Baltimore home. He was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bond Street, he was the son of Edward Thompson, a laborer, and Emma Milburn Thompson, a housekeeper and baker. He attended School 113 and Dunbar Junior-Senior High School. While at school, he met his future wife, Geneva Davis. As a young man, he worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He enlisted in the Navy during World War II. After the war, he joined American Smelting and Refining Co. in Southeast Baltimore, where he worked until the plant closed in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
The company redeveloping the former Solo Cup site in Owings Mills has made overtures to the owners of the Owings Mills Mall about purchasing that property, its CEO said Thursday. Leaders of Greenberg Gibbons, which is preparing to tear down the old Solo Cup plant to build the Foundry Row retail center on Reisterstown Road, "are big believers in the Owings Mills market and would love to do Foundry Row and the mall," chairman and CEO Brian Gibbons said. "We've reached out" to the mall owners, said Gibbons, whose company is based in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich | August 28, 2012
The Baltimore County Council on Tuesday voted to allow retail at the former Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills, but opponents of a planned shopping center there say they will not give up their fight against the project. At a packed meeting, the council decided 6-1 to approve a zoning change at the old manufacturing site on Reisterstown Road so that developer Greenberg Gibbons can move forward with its proposed $140 million Foundry Row shopping center featuring a Wegmans supermarket. Those who are against the project say they will now seek to bring the issue to a voter referendum.
NEWS
By Noel Levy and Ruth Goldstein | July 18, 2012
Something really wonderful is coming to Owings Mills. The Solo Cup factory (which used to be Sweetheart Cup, which used to be Maryland Cup Corp.) was sold in 2011. Less than a year later, a shovel-ready proposal awaits zoning approval by the Baltimore County Council. Foundry Row is an upscale retail, restaurant and office project, anchored by Wegmans, the quintessential suburban food palace. The vote will take place Aug. 28. Contrary to its detractors, Foundry Row will be a boon to the community, the county and the state.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1998
Laurel residents trying to save one of the suburban town's last ties to its milling roots are getting a little help from a Baltimore group and a state delegate.The Neighborhood Design Center in Baltimore, a nonprofit group that works with grass-roots organizations on revitalization projects, plans to help Friends of the First Street Foundry research the cost of restoring the building, possible uses for it and sources to pay for restoration."We feel this is a big boost," said Sidney Moore, a leader in the campaign to save the industrial building.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
Laurel residents are hoping to preserve a 132-year-old industrial building, one of the suburban town's last ties to its milling roots, from the wrecking ball the City Council has aimed at it.People in and around the historic district petitioned the council a few weeks ago for a six-month stay of execution for the Fairhall Foundry -- time to find grants to pay for restoration of the badly damaged stone building. Mayor Frank P. Casula is pushing the council to replace the building with a parking lot for the Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The Baltimore County planning board on Thursday approved the rezoning of a 52-acre site in Owings Mills to allow for a large-scale development project that will include a Wegmans grocery store, according to a news release from the developer. Foundry Row, a 385,000-square-feet mixed-use project to be built on the former Solo Cup property along Reisterstown Road, will also include a fitness center, a sporting goods store and shops, restaurants and offices. The project, estimated to cost $140 million, is being developed by Greenberg Gibbons and Vanguard Equities.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The Baltimore County Planning Board voted unanimously Thursday to allow the former Solo Cup property in Owings Mills to be redeveloped as an office and retail hub called Foundry Row. The 385,000 square foot development is expected to be anchored by a Wegmans grocery store, a fitness chain, and a sporting goods store. There will also be restaurants, more retail stores and 40,000 square feet of office space. The re-development of the 52-acre property will cost $140 million, according to a Thursday statement from project developer Greenberg Gibbons.
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