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Founding Fathers

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By Carl Byker | December 24, 2007
"Is he a president whose accomplishments we should celebrate or a president whose failures we should apologize for?" It's a question certain to spark a fierce debate about our current chief executive. But before we begin lamenting the divisiveness of modern politics, it's worth remembering that Americans have elected more than a few presidents through the years who have been celebrated by some even as they have been deeply detested by others. Among the most instructive examples for our own times is Andrew Jackson.
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NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | July 4, 2013
If the name of any Founding Father crosses our minds on the Fourth of July, it's probably not John Adams'. The second U.S. president rarely gets mentioned alongside Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, the founders we associate with Independence Day . Adams? He was the surly, vainglorious brains behind the scenes who was (as the White House's website suggests) "more remarkable as a political philosopher" than as a leader. Amid the Olympian fireworks of the Founding Fathers, Adams was more of a sparkler.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 11, 2013
It didn't seem possible a dozen years ago today (Wednesday), but a lot of things have returned to normal. There have been fireworks and parades on the Fourth of July. Kids still try to catch a glimpse of Santa on Christmas Eve. Kids in 4-H still have mixed emotions of pride and sadness when they sell their livestock at the Harford County Farm Fair. And, unified in patriotism though we were on Sept. 11, 2001 and in the days and weeks that followed, we have long since discovered that we retained our differences.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
It was appalling to see columnist Dan Rodricks criticize Dr. Ben Carson for flirting with Republican politics ("Ben Carson's biblically based conservatism," March 31). I wish Mr. Rodricks wouldn't always look at the world through the prism of liberalism but be open-minded enough to also see things through the eyes of conservatives. What's wrong with Dr. Carson dabbling in Republican politics? Rush Limbaugh's conservative, common-sense ideas could help liberals like Mr. Rodricks to understand what made this country great.
NEWS
By Andrew Burt | July 15, 2003
I DON'T know many Americans who tolerate anyone treading on our Constitution. Yet those individuals the recording industry recently sued for wanton copyright violations on the Internet, if found guilty, did exactly that. Every time someone downloads a commercial book, song, film or software program that they ought to pay for, they're not just committing a crime, they're spitting on our Constitution and devaluing the American way of life. The Constitution is the blueprint that defines who and what we are as a country.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The federal government sort of closed for business this week, a shameful display that unfortunately is neither unprecedented nor out of character. It's worth stressing the sort-of aspect of the shutdown because the U.S. Armed Forces remain on guard, the Postal Service continues to deliver the mail and, after the political lessons of the last self-inflicted federal shutdown, Social Security and other checks will still be cut and distributed. In other words, no one involved thinks the country is going to close up shop and the states go their separate ways.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
The Maritime Republic of Eastport was birthed, as any ersatz republic worth its salt should be, over drinks at a bar. In a clandestine meeting in the basement of the Rams Head Tavern, the founding fathers wrote a mock declaration of independence from Annapolis on cocktail napkins and thus, seven years ago, a faux nation was born. The revolt didn't exactly stick - to the founders' dismay, the neighborhood of Eastport is still part of Annapolis - but once a year, residents flex their independence muscles at a huge tug of war that pits the feisty community against what they view as a frightfully stodgy enemy: downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 6, 2014
A plea for about a dozen people who know who they are: Will you see "12 Years a Slave" now? It just won the Oscar for Best Picture. It just came out on DVD. Please see it. I'll even spring for the popcorn. You see, I keep encountering folks, mostly African-American, who have decided that they won't -- or can't -- see this movie. Some say they don't want to be made angry. Others say they don't want to be traumatized. I don't blame them for respecting the power of this film.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 4, 2014
Let us now praise Democratic hypocrisy. Throughout my life, various Republicans have suggested amending the Constitution in one way or another. A few years ago, they suggested revising the 14th Amendment to get rid of automatic birthright citizenship. Before that, some proposed amending the Constitution to lock in the traditional definition of marriage. Ronald Reagan wanted a presidential line-item veto added to the Constitution. On nearly every occasion, Democrats opposed such efforts, not just on the merits but on the puffed-up principle that we mustn't "tinker" or "tamper" with the genius of the Founding Fathers' constitutional design.
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