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Founding Fathers

NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2002
CHESTERTOWN - Sure, George Washington fought the Indians, defeated the British and set the mold for the American presidency. But can he sell? That is the question being asked by Washington College, the small liberal arts college on the Eastern Shore that was founded in 1782 with the help of 50 guineas from the nation's first president. In an attempt to raise its profile with prospective students, alumni and potential donors, the 1,250-student college has embarked on a mission to better market its association with Washington, who received an honorary degree from the school and served on its board.
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NEWS
July 20, 2014
On her website, Sen. Barbara Mikulski proclaims that she is joining other senators to introduce a "legislative fix to protect women's health" following the Supreme Court's recent decision in the Hobby Lobby case. Whether you are for abortion or against abortion, whether you think your employer should cover all birth control or not, whether you are a women or a man, this bill should bother you. Why? Because our Founding Fathers created three branches of government to check and balance each other.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | November 23, 1990
AS A DECENT, red-blooded American," Slats Grobnik said, "it's my patriotic duty to bad-mouth Congress, ain't it?"Of course. It's also fun and helps relieve one's hostilities."So I slam my fist on the newspaper and yell about how they throw my money around like playboys, screw up the S&Ls and run political campaigns with as much class as a couple in an alimony fight."Yes, you do fulfill your civic obligations."But as mad as I get, the law says we got to have a Congress, don't it?"Of course.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 11, 2013
It didn't seem possible a dozen years ago today (Wednesday), but a lot of things have returned to normal. There have been fireworks and parades on the Fourth of July. Kids still try to catch a glimpse of Santa on Christmas Eve. Kids in 4-H still have mixed emotions of pride and sadness when they sell their livestock at the Harford County Farm Fair. And, unified in patriotism though we were on Sept. 11, 2001 and in the days and weeks that followed, we have long since discovered that we retained our differences.
NEWS
By Andrew Burt | July 15, 2003
I DON'T know many Americans who tolerate anyone treading on our Constitution. Yet those individuals the recording industry recently sued for wanton copyright violations on the Internet, if found guilty, did exactly that. Every time someone downloads a commercial book, song, film or software program that they ought to pay for, they're not just committing a crime, they're spitting on our Constitution and devaluing the American way of life. The Constitution is the blueprint that defines who and what we are as a country.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The federal government sort of closed for business this week, a shameful display that unfortunately is neither unprecedented nor out of character. It's worth stressing the sort-of aspect of the shutdown because the U.S. Armed Forces remain on guard, the Postal Service continues to deliver the mail and, after the political lessons of the last self-inflicted federal shutdown, Social Security and other checks will still be cut and distributed. In other words, no one involved thinks the country is going to close up shop and the states go their separate ways.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
The Maritime Republic of Eastport was birthed, as any ersatz republic worth its salt should be, over drinks at a bar. In a clandestine meeting in the basement of the Rams Head Tavern, the founding fathers wrote a mock declaration of independence from Annapolis on cocktail napkins and thus, seven years ago, a faux nation was born. The revolt didn't exactly stick - to the founders' dismay, the neighborhood of Eastport is still part of Annapolis - but once a year, residents flex their independence muscles at a huge tug of war that pits the feisty community against what they view as a frightfully stodgy enemy: downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Carl Byker | December 24, 2007
"Is he a president whose accomplishments we should celebrate or a president whose failures we should apologize for?" It's a question certain to spark a fierce debate about our current chief executive. But before we begin lamenting the divisiveness of modern politics, it's worth remembering that Americans have elected more than a few presidents through the years who have been celebrated by some even as they have been deeply detested by others. Among the most instructive examples for our own times is Andrew Jackson.
NEWS
December 30, 2000
QUESTION OF THE MONTH? December's question asked readers whether they supported the Electoral College system and how they would reform the way we select our president. How should we choose our president? Small states still need protection The 2000 presidential election was a perfect example that the Electoral College system works. Our Founding Fathers developed it so that a "regional majority" could not sway the outcome. Had Vice President Al Gore Won the election, based on his slim popular vote margin, he would have been a candidate selected by a regional majority, mostly a handful of cities.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 29, 2014
The right wing insurrection at the Bundy ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., has taken another weird turn with new revelations about the family history of Cliven Bundy. Mr. Bundy justifies his two-decade-long refusal to pay the Bureau of Land Management for grazing rights on the public land where he runs his cattle by claiming his ancestors gained livestock water rights in the 1870s, long before the federal government horned in on the deal. Now, it turns out, that is not exactly true.
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