Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFound Objects
IN THE NEWS

Found Objects

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 8, 1993
Leonard Streckfus can look at a bowling pin and see the body of a horse, or at the points of a small shovel's scoop and see the ears of a cat. "Leaping Cat," in his current show at Galerie Francoise, is made of that shovel, a wooden baluster, some bike parts and a pump handle as a great long tail.Streckfus' junk -- or to be politically correct about it, "found object" -- sculpture can be taken simply for its fun value or treated more seriously as making an environmental statement as well.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 5, 2006
In the 1920s, the Will's Dairy in Fells Point sold pasteurized milk in short, half-pint glass bottles embossed with an upbeat slogan: "Will's on milk is like Sterling on silver." Inside the Fells Point Time Bubble, a new interactive exhibit at the Fells Point Maritime Museum, one of the dairy's bottles -- clear, filled no longer with milk but with white Styrofoam pellets to accentuate its red lettering -- sits waiting to tell the story of a man whose spirit helped make the waterfront community what it is today.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2002
Despite a burden of troubles that might have disheartened a lesser artist, Baltimore native Tom Miller managed to create works that were full of joyful whimsy. The trademark of his style was a smile, expressed through gentle good humor that poked fun at life's pain even as it acknowledged it. Miller's career was tragically cut short in 2000 when, at the age of 54, he died after a protracted struggle with AIDS. By then he had become a beloved figure among local collectors, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his exquisite fancy.
BUSINESS
By EILS LOTOZO and EILS LOTOZO,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | January 17, 2006
He uses world as his flea market As the found-objects buyer for Anthropologie boutiques, Keith Johnson combs flea markets, antiques stores, art shows and bazaars around the world for marvelous things. He spends six months of the year in Europe, with periodic jaunts to Asia, buying old furniture and bric-a-brac, searching out artisans with distinctive wares. In other words, he gets paid to travel and shop. "It really is a fantastic job," says Johnson, whose finds serve as store fixtures, limited-run products or inspiration for new Anthropologie home-furnishings offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 15, 2004
When long-time Senator Theatre owner Tom Kiefaber first read about the miniature theaters of local artist Sally Mericle last year, a bright, incandescent bulb of inspiration switched on in the impresario's brain. "I thought, `She's got lots of little teeny tiny theaters, and I've got a great big one,' " Kiefaber recalled. "What could be more interesting than bringing the two together?" Which is why when the Senator brought The Return of the King, the final installment of the popular Lord of the Rings trilogy, to its big screen last month, four of Mericle's little theaters were set up on display in the Senator's circular lobby.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 24, 1998
The president is heading to Tiananmen Square, where the People's Liberation Army will protect him from predatory young women.If only English and Germans could behave with the civility of Iranians and Americans at a soccer match.When GM and UAW go the distance, Toyota wins.Nothing in this column is fabricated. It consists entirely of found objects.Pub Date: 6/24/98
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Found art -- Howard Community College Art Gallery is presenting sculptures made of discarded wood, plastics, rubber and other found objects by John Watson in a solo exhibition, Small Town, through Nov. 10. A reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. The gallery is on the first floor of the college's Administration Building, next to the Smith Theatre lobby. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 410-772-4870.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | February 20, 2005
As artists Lisa and Scott Cylinder scour flea markets, antique shops and yard sales for old Mono-poly hotels, Bakelite dice and wood checkers, nostalgia for childhood games is only part of the allure. Before the Cylinders fashion their finds into brooches and other art jewelry pieces, they slice, carve and sculpt them into something entirely new. In a piece called Darwinian, an altered domino and die form elements of a bright red geometric bird and the flower it rests on. In Stop Sign, another visual pun of a brooch, a circle of Monopoly hotels surrounds a tree-stump forest mired in macadam.
NEWS
October 25, 2005
Arman, 76, a French sculptor known internationally for his surprising accumulations of trash and found objects, died of cancer Saturday at his home in New York. A founding member of the Nouveau Realistes, a group that included Yves Klein, Daniel Spoerri and Jean Tinguely, Mr. Arman made his mark in the 1960s. For a famous exhibition in 1960 at the Iris Clert Gallery in Paris he responded to Mr. Klein's exhibition La Vide ("The Void"), which consisted of an entirely empty gallery, by filling the gallery floor to ceiling with rubbish and calling it Le Plein ("Full Up")
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | September 11, 1991
The BAUhouse's support of new work by emerging artists is that gallery's most important enterprise. And its second annual BEAMS exhibition (BAUhouse Emerging Artists' Multi-media Survey) may be the gallery's best show to date.Representing 39 artists from Virginia to Pennsylvania, the 50 works here include essays in painting, sculpture and newer forms incorporating such diverse media as photography, computer graphics and found objects. Each piece partakes of vitality and ingenuity in equal measure.
NEWS
October 25, 2005
Arman, 76, a French sculptor known internationally for his surprising accumulations of trash and found objects, died of cancer Saturday at his home in New York. A founding member of the Nouveau Realistes, a group that included Yves Klein, Daniel Spoerri and Jean Tinguely, Mr. Arman made his mark in the 1960s. For a famous exhibition in 1960 at the Iris Clert Gallery in Paris he responded to Mr. Klein's exhibition La Vide ("The Void"), which consisted of an entirely empty gallery, by filling the gallery floor to ceiling with rubbish and calling it Le Plein ("Full Up")
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Found art -- Howard Community College Art Gallery is presenting sculptures made of discarded wood, plastics, rubber and other found objects by John Watson in a solo exhibition, Small Town, through Nov. 10. A reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. The gallery is on the first floor of the college's Administration Building, next to the Smith Theatre lobby. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 410-772-4870.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | February 20, 2005
As artists Lisa and Scott Cylinder scour flea markets, antique shops and yard sales for old Mono-poly hotels, Bakelite dice and wood checkers, nostalgia for childhood games is only part of the allure. Before the Cylinders fashion their finds into brooches and other art jewelry pieces, they slice, carve and sculpt them into something entirely new. In a piece called Darwinian, an altered domino and die form elements of a bright red geometric bird and the flower it rests on. In Stop Sign, another visual pun of a brooch, a circle of Monopoly hotels surrounds a tree-stump forest mired in macadam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 15, 2004
When long-time Senator Theatre owner Tom Kiefaber first read about the miniature theaters of local artist Sally Mericle last year, a bright, incandescent bulb of inspiration switched on in the impresario's brain. "I thought, `She's got lots of little teeny tiny theaters, and I've got a great big one,' " Kiefaber recalled. "What could be more interesting than bringing the two together?" Which is why when the Senator brought The Return of the King, the final installment of the popular Lord of the Rings trilogy, to its big screen last month, four of Mericle's little theaters were set up on display in the Senator's circular lobby.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2002
Despite a burden of troubles that might have disheartened a lesser artist, Baltimore native Tom Miller managed to create works that were full of joyful whimsy. The trademark of his style was a smile, expressed through gentle good humor that poked fun at life's pain even as it acknowledged it. Miller's career was tragically cut short in 2000 when, at the age of 54, he died after a protracted struggle with AIDS. By then he had become a beloved figure among local collectors, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his exquisite fancy.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 30, 2002
With the recent warnings of possible future terrorist attacks, the whole subject of America's relationship to Islamic fundamentalism has become extremely touchy, and certainly no laughing matter. Yet artists can be notoriously irreverent, even to the point of making us chuckle at our own worst fears. The group show at St. Paul Art & Design Gallery brings together four young artists who all used to be roommates: painters Alex Kondner and William Marshall, sculptor Joshua Hershkovitz and photographer Paul Stoppi.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | December 11, 1993
1/8 TC This is a tale of two Davids.David Hess makes furniture out of found objects, mostly metal -- everything from manhole covers to boiler parts. David Klein makes furniture out of found objects, mostly wood -- wood from buildings that have been closed, abandoned or hit by fire. Each has his own studio, but they also make furniture together.A group of their pieces, both individual and collaborative, is now on view at Galerie Francoise, and it's a study in strengths. These works, made from bits and pieces of things, don't look like that at all. They have enormous wholeness, integrity.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 30, 2002
With the recent warnings of possible future terrorist attacks, the whole subject of America's relationship to Islamic fundamentalism has become extremely touchy, and certainly no laughing matter. Yet artists can be notoriously irreverent, even to the point of making us chuckle at our own worst fears. The group show at St. Paul Art & Design Gallery brings together four young artists who all used to be roommates: painters Alex Kondner and William Marshall, sculptor Joshua Hershkovitz and photographer Paul Stoppi.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | November 28, 1999
Gardeners are beginning to see the humor in their gentle pastime. Folk art, found objects, silly signs, fashionably dressed statues, bizarre birdhouses and brazen Technicolor plant combinations are popping up in perfectly respectable gardens everywhere, just for the fun of it."It all stems from creativity -- and having the courage to do it," says Tovah Martin, who with Richard W. Brown has written "Garden Whimsy" (Houghton Mifflin, $30), a lighthearted look at humor in U.S. gardens. "We took ourselves seriously at first, when we were new gardeners.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 1, 1998
A friend of Allison Dickinson recently came into her new gallery, Paper-Rock-Scissors, looked around and said: "This says exactly who you are, and it's all about expression."Dickinson (right), an interior designer, is certainly expressive -- whether she's talking about the knit boas by Ruxton artist Mary Miller that she carries, Cherna Bednarsh's funky fleece hats or Julie Dove's beaded necklaces.The walls of her Hampden gallery are covered with paintings, wire sculptures and more, but there's also plenty of wearable art, including jewelry, handbags, ties and accessories.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.