Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFought
IN THE NEWS

Fought

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 8, 2004
On April 6, 2004 DELORES MAE FOUGHT (nee Keller) of Elkridge, beloved wife of Daniel Clay Fought; loving daughter of Mildred Smith Keller of Hughesville, PA, loving mother of Tyrus Fought of Ferndale, MD and Jacob Fought of Elkridge, MD; dear sister of Bill Keller of Muncy, PA and Elaine Tule of Victorville, CA. A Memorial service will be held at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME AT MEADOWRIDGE MEMORIAL PARK, INC., 7250 Washington Blvd (exit 6 off Route...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 1, 1995
A Pasadena woman fought off a man who reached through her car window and tried to try to snatch her purse, county police said.Gail M. Sheehan, 29, told police she was leaving the Dollar Store in the Sun Valley Shopping Center in the 7900 block of Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd. shortly before 8 p.m. Monday when a man approached her and asked for money.She refused him, got in her car and put her purse on the passenger seat, she reported. The man reached through the driver's side window, but Ms. Sheehan fought him off, police said.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 14, 1994
When Wild Man Joe O'Connell went looking for a fight, nobody was safe, including Joe himself. You could look it up. Pro boxers, street fighters, carnival brawlers, he took 'em all on. Plus, not to be overlooked, a gorilla and a kangaroo who should have known better.For the record, Joe says the gorilla and the kangaroo were the roughest fights he had. But that's just his word. Nobody's asked the gorilla or the kangaroo their side of it."I just liked to fight," Joe was explaining yesterday.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1998
Alfred U. McKenzie, a World War II bomber pilot and one of the original Tuskegee Airmen, spent a good part of his life fighting. He fought for his country. He fought against racial discrimination in the military. He fought against poverty in his community.Through all the fights -- including one that led to his arrest by the military on mutiny charges -- Mr. McKenzie's love for flying and for justice thrived, and he lived as a proud airman and defender of the underdog throughout his life.Mr.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | November 12, 1992
Most athletes, given to truth, will tell you they are rarely accorded enough credit for their accomplishments. Or maybe it's that they receive too much criticism when things don't go well.Baseball players, as a whole, are particularly thin-skinned, gobbling up the adulation when their hits win a game while thinking a costly error should be glossed over as "just one of those things."The pro who is probably most justified, even completely justified, to complain when his efforts are downgraded, though, are boxers.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1998
Costas E. Themelis lived quietly for a half-century with his family in Highlandtown.Not until his funeral was a secret unveiled -- that as a tough resistance fighter and a highly decorated Greek soldier who fought the Nazis in World War II, he received the prestigious Cross of St. Mark.At Oaklawn Cemetery in Baltimore on Thursday, Col. Chris Portocholis, the military attache from the Greek Embassy in Washington, spoke reverent words over Mr. Themelis' flag-draped coffin:"Let the soil above your casket weigh lightly on it," said the colonel, invoking a cultural tribute reserved for the bravest and most dedicated.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
Mary Frances Garland, a South Baltimore community activist who fought for neighborhood recognition and raised her voice against highways and high-rises, died of a brain tumor Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice at Mercy Medical Center. She was 68 and lived on Webster Street. She battled in the 1960s and 1970s against a planned interstate highway that threatened to cut through parts of Federal Hill, South Baltimore and the Sharp-Leadenhall neighborhoods. She also criticized a suspension bridge that would have cut diagonally across the Inner Harbor, cutting it in half.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- A soft breeze rustles dying leaves on this serene slope. That's the sound of Culp's Hill today.Most visitors to the Gettysburg battleground ignore this quiet, out-of-the-way expanse of rocks and trees. Few know that here, 131 years ago, Marylander clashed with Marylander in fighting as vicious and significant as anywhere on the battlefield.But this weekend the spotlight at Gettysburg will shine on Maryland. In a ceremony Sunday featuring Civil War re-enactors as well as fighter jets, Marylanders will return to Gettysburg to dedicate a memorial to the state's soldiers, Union and Confederate, who fought here in the Civil War's pivotal battle.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A nearly $1.7 million payment from Baltimore County to the police union to resolve a battle over retiree health care costs included about $228,000 in interest accrued while the county fought court rulings in the case. The county wrote a check last week to the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 to reimburse more than 400 retirees who the state's highest court determined were overcharged for health insurance premiums. The dispute began seven years ago, eventually reaching the Maryland Court of Appeals in 2012.
NEWS
May 24, 2014
Republican Ron George releases the first commercial in his campaign for governor, an introductory spot that also chronicles his opposition to tax increases. What the ad says : George a two-term state delegate from Anne Arundel County, is shown with family members and at a jewelry store he owns in Annapolis. In one frame, he is with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is raising an arm and smiling, though Ehrlich has not endorsed anyone in the race for governor. "He did not aspire to be in government, but when his community called, he stepped up to the plate," a voice-over says.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
In your edition of March 20, your reader Greg Clemmer states that to cite Charles Stanley's Confederate military service is "politically correct. " Well, if political correctness is what you wish to see, you need look no further than Article III of the federal Constitution, which describes levying war against the United States as a criminal act. That's what Charles Stanley did by joining the Confederate Army, regardless of his "heritage," his motives and the good works that he did later.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
A key witness in the case of Tyrone West — whose death in police custody has sparked a citywide debate — told investigators that West fought with officers, but that they continued to hit him after he gave up, according to documents released this week. "He was saying, 'You got me, you got me, stop hitting me,'" Corinthea Servance told detectives. "Natural instinct, you're going to ward them off. … I was screaming at him, just lay down. Whatever they're telling you to do, take the pain.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 11, 2014
Former Baltimore heavyweight contender Larry Middleton died Thursday at age 71. Middleton won 23 bouts, including 14 by knockout, lost 10 and drew 10 in a career that started in 1965 and ended in 1978. Fighting out of Baltimore-based trainer Mack Lewis' gym, he won 19 straight bouts from 1966 to 1972, including a decision over eventual champion Joe Bugner in 1971. Middleton also fought other prominent heavyweights, including Ron Lyle, Jimmy Ellis, Oscar Bonavena, Duane Bobick, Ken Norton and Jerry Quarry.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBNERG | January 20, 1991
As a war escalates in the Middle East, the sporting society suffers mostly from a case of mild embarrassment. Issues that would otherwise engage us suddenly seem trivial. The disruption of seasons is minimal, almost nil, limited to the hollow symbolism of debating whether to postpone games.It is so because young Americans don't have to fight anymore unless that is their choice, and because, for whatever reasons, the imperative is no longer felt so keenly by so many. It wasn't always that way. A half-century ago, athletes did not merely lead cheers at the outbreak of war. They fought.
NEWS
By Stephen Kinzer and Stephen Kinzer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 15, 2002
CHANCELLORSVILLE, Va. - Here, where thousands fell in one of the greatest battles ever fought on American soil, a new confrontation is shaping up over the fate of the battlefield. At the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee scored one of his greatest triumphs, defeating a larger Union army with a series of brilliant maneuvers that are still studied in military academies. But the victory came at a terrible cost, because the man Lee called "my right arm," Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, known as "Stonewall," was mortally wounded by Confederate sentries.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Ellen Irene Rhudy, a writer and activist for Patapsco Valley environmental causes who also performed in community theater productions, died of complications from leukemia Nov. 24 at Howard County General Hospital. The Marriottsville resident was 69. Born Ellen Strauss in Baltimore and raised on Greystone Road in Arbutus, she was the daughter of Charles F. Strauss, a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory model builder, and his wife, the former Irene Stephan, a homemaker. She was a 1962 graduate of Catonsville High School.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
On a night when the Towson men's basketball team struggled to find its shooting touch, Jerrelle Benimon stepped up to help. The senior forward scored 21 of his game-high 32 points in the second half to lead the Tigers to a 75-69 comeback win against visiting Temple before an announced 3,554 at SECU Arena on Wednesday night. Benimon, the Colonial Athletic Association Preseason Player of the Year, had a previous career high of 31 points, set against George Mason on Feb. 26. He also finished with 10 rebounds as Towson improved to 3-0 for the first time since 1972.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.