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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and a group of faith leaders agreed Monday that thousands of immigrant children who have poured into the United States should be housed in foster homes and other small settings, not large centers as the federal government has proposed. The governor invited about 50 religious leaders and others to meet at the State House in response to the crisis that has developed along the nation's southern border as tens of thousands of unaccompanied children - many fleeing violence in Central America - have entered the country seeking refuge.
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NEWS
August 1, 2014
If Gov. Martin O'Malley is so committed to fostering undocumented children who have crossed our border illegally, I suggest he install a number of FEMA trailers on the grounds of Government House ( "O'Malley seeks to house immigrant children in foster homes, not large centers," July 21). Then the governor and the First Lady could foster any number of undocumented immigrant children. The governor has more than enough financial resources to support these foster children in his campaign war chest.
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NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
Barbara Bent and her husband had been content to be a "two-dog" family. But the Eldersburg woman is cradling Baby Gizmo in her arms, and she doesn't want the puppy, a survivor of Hurricane Katrina, to leave. "He's turned into my shadow," Bent says. "I was hoping another two weeks would go by and we'd get to keep him." Gizmo is one of at least 80 pets pulled from the wreckage on the Gulf Coast who are being cared for in shelters or homes in Maryland. Some in foster care here may become permanent, adopted family members.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Perhaps Gov. Martin O'Malley will open up his home and the State House for the immigrants ( "Call for foster homes renewed," July 29). That would be a fine gesture and show that he practices what he preaches. F. Cordell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jean Thompson contributed to this article | December 2, 1995
On the surface, it seemed like a good match. Jeffrey Clarke Weigel, 19, was by most accounts a nice fellow and a gifted artist who had a drinking problem and needed a place to live. Rosa Lee McNeil, a kind-hearted Pimlico resident who doesn't allow drinking in her home, welcomed the youth and the money the state would pay her for taking Mr. Weigel in.But what seemed like a good idea ended in a tragedy, raising questions about the state's program for placing troubled young people in foster homes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1997
NEW YORK -- As the case against an Arizona couple accused of abusing their newly adopted Russian daughters on a flight to New York City drags into its fifth month, the girls have been on their own strange odyssey.They have had to make six moves among four foster homes in two states, staying in two of the homes for only a few days.The girls, still Russian citizens who speak little English, are technically in the custody of New York City's Administration for Children's Services, which oversees 42,000 children in foster care.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1999
After rising steadily for years, the number of Maryland children entering foster care is declining, prompting state officials to claim success in their efforts to keep troubled families from splintering.More foster children also are being adopted, earning the state a bonus of $317,947 in federal funds last month.State Department of Human Resources officials take credit for both trends, saying their efforts to keep families together -- and to find homes for children who cannot stay with their parents -- have begun to pay off.But the state's efforts have not been able to shrink the number of children remaining in foster care.
NEWS
October 1, 2009
A hearing in Annapolis this week demonstrated with perfect clarity what the problem has been for all these years in caring for Maryland's most vulnerable children. Sen. Joan Carter Conway declared Tuesday that the Department of Human Resources' new strategy of placing troubled or neglected kids in family settings as opposed to group homes was unfair to the group homes. With all due respect to the group home operators who do a good job, that's just too bad. The children are our concern - not their livelihood.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Perhaps Gov. Martin O'Malley will open up his home and the State House for the immigrants ( "Call for foster homes renewed," July 29). That would be a fine gesture and show that he practices what he preaches. F. Cordell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 17, 2006
Despite repeated promises to halt the practice, the Baltimore Department of Social Services continues to illegally house children needing foster care at the agency's downtown office building, using it as a makeshift shelter even though it has no beds or showers. By now, the department's excuse for housing young charges in the building is well known: There just aren't enough foster homes for the 7,000 city kids who are wards of the state. Last year, about 150 children were housed in the building, sometimes for more than two weeks.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Maryland religious leaders issued a call for families to offer foster care to immigrant children from Central America as part of an effort to see that unaccompanied minors find shelter in homes rather than in barracks. Faith leaders who met with Gov. Martin O'Malley at the State House on Monday said as many as 2,000 children are expected to join more than 2,200 who have already found homes in Maryland, often with relatives, since the beginning of the year. Maryland has already taken in more of the immigrant children than all but a handful of large states.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and a group of faith leaders agreed Monday that thousands of immigrant children who have poured into the United States should be housed in foster homes and other small settings, not large centers as the federal government has proposed. The governor invited about 50 religious leaders and others to meet at the State House in response to the crisis that has developed along the nation's southern border as tens of thousands of unaccompanied children - many fleeing violence in Central America - have entered the country seeking refuge.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 19, 2014
Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, headquartered in Baltimore and celebrating its 75th anniversary with a gala tonight, has at least part of the solution to the problem of unaccompanied children crossing the U.S. border with Mexico - and it's not sending them back where they came from. LIRS thinks just the opposite should occur: a full embrace of the problem by the government and faith-based organizations, and foster homes for the children who have no relatives here. So officials at the national headquarters near Baltimore's Inner Harbor have been asking Lutheran families (and anyone else with a heart and a spare room)
HEALTH
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
As an alternative to a traditional nursing home facility, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has turned to a new program in which those in need of assisted-living care are treated in a more intimate setting. Medical foster homes place up to three patients, typically veterans, in the private home of a vetted caregiver who is responsible for their care on a daily basis. Additionally, physicians, therapists, social workers and other VA staffer members regularly work with the patients.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 10, 2013
The Dog Program at Luna's House Inc. reached an important milestone by adopting its 100th dog this month. Edison, a terrier mix, was adopted by Donna and Michael Lubawski of Edgewood on June 5, making Edison lucky number 100. Luna's House Inc. began rescuing dogs from various shelters and taking in individual surrenders in January 2012. The Luna's House Dog Program is made up entirely of volunteers who take care of the dogs and ensure the dogs are adopted to the best homes that match the dog's lifestyle.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 10, 2013
Have a passion for saving orphaned pets? Can you offer a between-homes home to a dog or cat? Have place in your heart and your house for a temporary visitor of the furry kind? Then this party is for you! The Maryland SPCA will hold an open house for prospective pet foster care volunteers from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 11. Attendees will learn how fostering needy pets can help save lives; meet current foster parents and the animals they care for; learn how to set up their homes to make fostering work for them; and receive a tour of the MD SPCA.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
If Gov. Martin O'Malley is so committed to fostering undocumented children who have crossed our border illegally, I suggest he install a number of FEMA trailers on the grounds of Government House ( "O'Malley seeks to house immigrant children in foster homes, not large centers," July 21). Then the governor and the First Lady could foster any number of undocumented immigrant children. The governor has more than enough financial resources to support these foster children in his campaign war chest.
NEWS
April 5, 1993
Despite their good intentions, foster care programs have not given social service professionals much reason to boast.All too often, these programs have not only failed to alleviate family tragedies but in some cases have exacerbated them.The professionals acknowledge this now. Indeed, it's no small indictment when the secretary of Maryland's Department of Human Resources says, "Clearly, experience has shown that foster care is not the best place for kids. I can't think of what's good about foster care."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Lionel L. Bass Jr., a retired Bethlehem Steel general foreman and decorated Korean War combat veteran, died of cancer complications Dec. 2 at his Timonium home. He was 82. The son of Lionel L. Bass Sr. and Barbara Ellen Grebner, he was born in Baltimore and lived briefly in the family's Highlandtown home. His parents died of tuberculosis. He was born with the disease and spent his first four years as a patient at the old Baltimore City Hospitals at Bayview. "He never learned to talk until he was 4 years old," said his daughter, Deborah Bass Bowden of Timonium.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Howard Community College's Marie Jean came to New York in 1984 as an 8-year-old Haitian immigrant, lost both parents within a year of arrival, and after frequently being denied food by foster parents, she relished attending school because, as she says, "That was the only place you knew you were going to eat. " Her life story reads like a stroke of misfortune. In 1992, Jean was involved in an automobile accident that left her in need of more than three dozen surgeries. She required rehabilitation and needed to relearn how to read and write.
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