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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
Baltimore County police have identified a youth found shot to death along an Essex roadside as 16-year-old David M. Lafferty of Baltimore.Police found Lafferty's body Sunday morning in the 1400 block of Evergreen Lane after being called by a neighbor. Lafferty, of the 5500 block of Edna Ave., attended Northern High School in Baltimore, said Vanessa C. Pyatt, a city schools spokeswoman.City juvenile authorities placed the Baltimore native in the care of a foster family three weeks ago after he was charged with discharging a firearm in the city, Lafferty's family said.
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NEWS
By Lane Page | August 21, 2014
Rescued from a hot U-Haul truck with more than a dozen others in July 2013, 9-year-old pit bull mix Layla was so depressed in her pen that Howard County Animal Shelter workers brought her up front for some human companionship. And Katelin Rowley, contemplating a cat to buddy up with her dog, Hanai, headed to the same shelter and promptly fell for the dog "so pitiful I couldn't leave her. " Sometimes because of age, health issues, personality problems or just plain bad luck, rescued animals simply can't wait for adoption.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1992
TAVARES, Fla. -- Gregory K. wants a divorce.From his parents.This isn't the movies, where a poor little rich girl like Drew Barrymore pouts precociously as her Hollywood-gorgeous parents bicker about their marriage.It's the sad life of a real 11-year-old Central Florida boy, who -- according to court records -- has been passed liked a hot potato from an abusive, alcoholic father to a neglectful mother, to a foster home, back to the mother, to another foster home, to a boys ranch and finally to another foster family.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Maryland religious leaders issued a call for families to offer foster care to immigrant children from Central America as part of an effort to see that unaccompanied minors find shelter in homes rather than in barracks. Faith leaders who met with Gov. Martin O'Malley at the State House on Monday said as many as 2,000 children are expected to join more than 2,200 who have already found homes in Maryland, often with relatives, since the beginning of the year. Maryland has already taken in more of the immigrant children than all but a handful of large states.
NEWS
By Patty Shillington and Patty Shillington,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 23, 1992
TAVARES, Fla. -- Gregory K. wants a divorce. From his parents.The 11-year-old Central Florida boy has been passed like a hot potato from an abusive, alcoholic father to a neglectful mother, to a foster home, back to his mother, to another foster home, to a boys ranch and finally to another foster family, court records say.Now, in a lawsuit believed to be unprecedented nationwide, the boy is asking a Lake County Civil Court judge to cut the legal cord that...
NEWS
July 28, 1992
An 11-year-old Florida boy identified as Gregory K. wants to sever the legal ties to his mother and father. In effect, he wants to divorce his parents.His lawsuit, thought to be unprecedented in the United States, alleges he has suffered a lifetime of neglect and emotional abuse at the hands of his natural mother and father. Since the age of three, Gregory has been shunted about from his parents to foster families to state homes. He has even lived out of a car with his alcoholic father. For the past 2 1/2 years, the boy has been in the custody of Florida's social services department.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 25, 1992
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Cradled by the family that would be his, 12-year-old Gregory Kingsley fidgeted on a hardwood court bench as the adults who control his destiny maneuvered over his unprecedented bid to "divorce" his parents.Brown-haired and pale, Gregory -- who wants to be adopted by his foster family -- sat shielded by potential brothers and sisters as witnesses testified yesterday his mother neglected and sometimes beat her three children, abused alcohol and drugs, attempted suicide and entertained men in her bedroom in return for cash.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2005
A woman who lost custody of her children while in a city witness protection program filed a $34 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Department of Social Services yesterday, alleging that her toddler son suffered a fractured skull when he was slammed onto concrete steps while staying with a foster family. The lawsuit filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court alleges that the boy, who was 2 1/2 at the time of the incident last year, sufferers from severe brain damage and requires constant medical care.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
Strange, the young woman recalled, how tired and troubled Allen Leroy Hilton appeared outside the tidy, light-blue townhouse in the quiet community of Evergreen.Inside, on the night of Oct. 9, friends and neighbors were helping Kelly Dore celebrate her 30th birthday with music, liquor and a keg of beer in the basement. Outside, a light rain had fallen, and a chilly wind was blowing as Mr. Hilton, 19, sat on the front steps alone, brooding."He was very lit [intoxicated] and in a very bad mood," Marianne Gawne said.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 6, 1991
An hour of television on Maryland Public Broadcasting tonight tries to dispel the negative image that is conjured up by the words "foster care."When foster parents or children make it into the media, it's usually a story of neglect or abuse. Sometimes, ill-equipped parents are given care of a vulnerable child. Sometimes a child has fallen through the cracks in the system and wound up lost and in trouble. Sometimes, the good, hard-working parents are not given the support they need and find themselves at the mercy of an uncaring bureaucracy.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | August 3, 2011
Three years ago, two Harford County couples made a decision that would change their families forever. Feeling the urge to help others in need, they decided to become foster parents. In the United States, there are more than 400,000 foster children. Approximately 6,500 foster kids live in Maryland, out of which 250 call Harford County home. From the outside, foster families look just like other families, but their situation is unique. The call to pick up a child in need of assistance could come at any time and foster parents have to be ready at a moment's notice.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2011
About half the Baltimore County children in need of foster care come from neighborhoods with the least number of certified foster homes, a situation that county officials are trying to address with a pilot program designed to establish a strong network of neighborhood-based resource families. The Dundalk Community Partnership will focus on the area with the greatest need for foster homes and expects to draw churches, schools and nonprofit organizations into efforts to spur recruitment.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
In Lennice Hudson's home, a refuge for foster children, Darius Ray found stability. He became a track star at his Gaithersburg high school, graduated, flirted with college and ultimately joined the Marines. Between his foster brothers and sisters and Hudson's two biological children, he had a family, one he would join every week for dinner. On Sunday, the family was planning to celebrate his 20th birthday. "I love you and I want a red velvet cake," he texted Hudson in anticipation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
While adoptions increased across the state last year, placements dropped in Howard County, but not enough to trouble social services officials. The findings, as well as news of increases in delinquent child-support payments, come from state social service officials, who recently released data for the fiscal year that ended June 30. Across Maryland, 617 children were adopted during the fiscal year that ended June 30, compared with 563 the year before....
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Sam Macer didn't think much of it when a second-grader he was tutoring in Baltimore County asked if she could live with him. Children say those sorts of things; he obviously couldn't just whisk her away from her family. Then one day, the little girl stopped coming to school. Macer figured she was lost to him forever. But a short time later, when he was visiting his mother-in-law in Anne Arundel County, he spotted the girl playing on the swings. She had been removed from her home, she told him, and placed with a foster family there.
NEWS
June 4, 2008
Too many Maryland children in foster care are in group homes, which are generally more expensive than family care and not as responsive to the needs of abused and neglected youngsters. That recent assessment by the nonprofit group Advocates for Children and Youth is on the mark, and Brenda Donald, who heads the state's Department of Human Resources, agrees. Her agency hopes to recruit 1,000 new foster families by 2010. But ACY counts only 89 new families since June 2007. The agency needs to step up its recruiting and do more to help existing foster families.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Lisa and Jeffrey Bodick always wanted a large family. Now the foster parents are fighting to hold on to the 2-year-old girl they've raised almost since birth. The Bodicks, of Catonsville, have accused Baltimore's Department of Social Services of reneging on a promise to allow them to adopt the tiny, bashful child with blonde curls and striking blue-green eyes who joined them at their home when she was 13 days old. The agency wants to place the child with a Howard County family that adopted her two older siblings.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
They were lost in the Florida Straits, drifting atop rope-lashed planks of wood and sagging rubber dinghies. But as they pitched across the shark-infested waters, the 139 Cuban teen-agers who had abandoned family and country kept their hopes alive with visions of life in the United States.There would be Reeboks and blue jeans, they told one another, and cities where the food would never run out. There would be sports cars to drive, grand houses to furnish and places where people could speak without fear.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
State legislators are considering a bill that would significantly increase reimbursement to foster families for the first time in more than a decade, action that advocates argue is needed to recruit families to the foster system and cut down on high-cost group home placements. Foster families in Maryland receive about $560 per child each month, a figure that includes a $25 rate increase that went into effect Jan. 1. State officials have promised to increase reimbursement by an additional $75 starting July 1, for a total of $635 a month on average, but advocates argue that figure is still $250 less than the rate recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
December 7, 2005
The second financial step in the Ehrlich administration's push to stem the eroding numbers of Maryland's foster families - boosting their monthly stipend by $25 per month - adds insult to injury. With the administration currently spending $1 million on a marketing campaign to recruit more families to temporarily house children in desperate need, the roughly $1 million a year to boost monthly payments for the 3,400 families already providing such care is a pittance - particularly after 15 years of no increases.
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