Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFoster Children
IN THE NEWS

Foster Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Dustin Bradsher attended seven different high schools, three in his senior year, while he was in foster care. From the time he was 5, he bounced from one Baltimore-area foster home to another, with no responsible, caring adult that he could turn to for guidance and support. "There were so many foster homes, but no one seemed to really watch over me," said Bradsher, now 25. Little changed until he was housed in a hospital for the mentally ill and Anne Feehley entered his life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Maryland has won a five-year, $650 million federal grant that will give officials more flexibility to run the state's foster care program and reduce the number of children entering the system, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration said Tuesday. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant, which has been awarded to about 20 states so far, will allow Maryland to expand programs that help struggling families to avoid having their children turned over to foster care, state officials said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Glenn Zior's neighbors in Mount Airy have never been bothered by lights flashing four hours every night and traffic filling the narrow street as car after car stops to watch and maybe leave a donation, he said. In fact, many have asked him when his annual display will be ready. The lights will be on this weekend, he has promised. "Neighbors love the display, and a few have complained that it hasn't gone up yet," he said. Days before he tackled the annual remaking of his front yard into a holiday wonderland, Zior estimated he was short about 10,000 lights.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The article by Doug Donovan related to the legislative audit of the Maryland Department of Human Resources ( "Md. agency failed to monitor placement of foster children, audit says," Aug. 20) is missing some important information. It fails to point out the enormous strides made by DHR in recognizing that when children need out-of-home care, relatives are often the best option and that "place matters. " Kinship caregivers are most likely to be known by the children, live locally and minimize the disruption and trauma when they are removed from a parent or parents they love.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
State officials placed at least 32 children in foster homes despite credible evidence that the care providers had abused or neglected children, according to a General Assembly audit released Friday. Auditors found that officials with the Social Services Administration also failed to follow up on 159 children born to parents who had had their parental rights terminated for abuse or neglect. The auditors blamed the computer system that the Maryland agency uses to monitor child services and said many of the deficiencies had not been corrected.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
After Ryan Weinberger's parents died while he was in foster care, Maryland collected his Social Security survivor's benefits of more than $30,000 to help cover his state-funded living expenses. Now Weinberger, 21, wants to persuade the General Assembly to pass legislation to stop the Department of Human Resources from confiscating benefits available to hundreds of foster children each year. "It's not right what they're doing - it's not their money," said Weinberger, who lives in Abingdon.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Some foster children were placed in the care of relatives with a history of alleged abuse or neglect because Maryland's social services agency did not properly monitor local agencies, according to a new audit. State auditors found that 16 children, ranging in age from 2 months to nearly 5 years old, were put in the care of relatives despite "credible evidence of abuse or neglect" by them before or during the placements. The Office of Legislative Audits, which released the report this week, reviewed records from July 2010 to January 2013.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 1, 2006
Ray Winbush can spot them, even when they're as young as 7 or 8. The Morgan State professor was speaking to an elementary school class in Philadelphia, when one boy kept acting out and got even more petulant when Winbush told him to sit down. When the students went around the room telling Winbush what they wanted to be when they grew up - the usual doctors and lawyers and such - the boy said angrily, "Policeman, so I can arrest you." Later, he would ask their teacher, "Is that boy in foster care?"
NEWS
November 10, 1995
IF ANYONE needs proof that government makes a poorparent, ask some of the kids who have been shuttled through the foster care system. One of the biggest problems these children face is the lack of a sense of urgency in resolving their cases.As things stand now, foster children who cannot return to their biological families can wait years for a permanent home. But such a regimen is tough on children; as time passes, they become less attractive to potential adoptive parents, particularly when they bring with them troubled histories.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | January 22, 2007
Back from a short commercial break, WOLB radio show host Kewanee Smith shouts out a warm "Welcome back, Baltimore!" before turning to the telephone, its lights blinking, to take calls. First up is Johnny. "My son is 14 years old, and he keeps asking me to adopt him a little brother," says Johnny. Next up is Sharon, who wants to know why it is difficult to adopt, and later, Linda, who had adopted a little girl and wants to say how happy she is. Typical talk radio this is not. And Smith, a licensed social worker with more than 30 years experience in the foster care field, is no typical host.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Some foster children were placed in the care of relatives with a history of alleged abuse or neglect because Maryland's social services agency did not properly monitor local agencies, according to a new audit. State auditors found that 16 children, ranging in age from 2 months to nearly 5 years old, were put in the care of relatives despite "credible evidence of abuse or neglect" by them before or during the placements. The Office of Legislative Audits, which released the report this week, reviewed records from July 2010 to January 2013.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
If Gov. Martin O'Malley is so committed to fostering undocumented children who have crossed our border illegally, I suggest he install a number of FEMA trailers on the grounds of Government House ( "O'Malley seeks to house immigrant children in foster homes, not large centers," July 21). Then the governor and the First Lady could foster any number of undocumented immigrant children. The governor has more than enough financial resources to support these foster children in his campaign war chest.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents - adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
Maryland's practice of shoring up its foster care budget by appropriating the Social Security survivor benefits of the children in its care is questionable and merits close scrutiny by legislators. Maryland is hardly alone in taking this step, and prohibiting it would present financial and logistical hurdles. But there is a strong case to be made that it is unfair to the children the state is supposed to be caring for. The state has an obligation to care for children who are abused or neglected, and the children are not expected to pay the state back.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
After Ryan Weinberger's parents died while he was in foster care, Maryland collected his Social Security survivor's benefits of more than $30,000 to help cover his state-funded living expenses. Now Weinberger, 21, wants to persuade the General Assembly to pass legislation to stop the Department of Human Resources from confiscating benefits available to hundreds of foster children each year. "It's not right what they're doing - it's not their money," said Weinberger, who lives in Abingdon.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
I am sure that there will be great criticism about Baltimore social services workers' decision to have foster kids get their diplomas in a day through a school in Philadelphia ( "Diplomas in a day," Nov. 25). While it may not be the best way for these children to get their diplomas, we need to think about why these kids are in this situation. Traditional school is not for everyone. Children in foster care are often traumatized, moving from place to place, and therefore from school to school.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | December 11, 2006
The implementation of the state's new foster child tracking system in Baltimore has been delayed because of continued reports of operating glitches and growing concern among child advocates, including the city's health commissioner, that the system will remain flawed unless more time and money are invested to fix it. The Baltimore Department of Social Services was slated to start using the Chessie computer system - short for Children's Electronic Social...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton directed the federal government yesterday to take steps to double the number of children moved from foster care to adoption during the next six years.Clinton announced the initiative in his weekly radio address, this time joined on the air by his wife, Hillary, by adoptive families and by children hoping for a permanent home."I can think of no better way to fulfill the promise of this season than to bring a child into a family, and a family to a child," Clinton said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
The Baltimore Department of Social Services on Monday pledged a comprehensive review of alternative education programs for foster children, after revelations that it paid $40,000 to send students to a school in Philadelphia where they obtained a diploma in one day. The Crooked Places Made Straight Academy, where 80 youths from Baltimore took a three-hour exam to obtain a Pennsylvania high school diploma, shut down its one-day program Friday after...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Kathleen T. Perry, a devout Roman Catholic who opened up her heart and home to children, died Tuesday at St. Martin's Home in Catonsville after a recent medical procedure. The longtime Fallston resident was 93. "Kathleen was a saintly person. Everything was positive, and she loved everyone," said Sister Lourdes Miranda, a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor and director of the Lourdes Unit at St. Martin's Home where Mrs. Perry resided. "She was a very devout Catholic who always went to Mass.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.