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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2003
Piles of Playskool toys and a booster seat in primary colors sit in the dining room of Nicole Lever's home in Glen Burnie. But there hasn't been a toddler using them since August. The foster child who lived there for nearly 17 months was taken from the home by county social services officials while he watched Sesame Street, after genetic tests showed that Lever's then-husband had fathered a child by the couple's other foster child, a teen-age girl. And while Lever was not implicated -- her former husband has since been convicted of child abuse and left the state -- she remains frustrated in her attempt to adopt the toddler.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The July death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child has been ruled a homicide — six years after the Baltimore city boy's mother was accused of shaking him into a coma-like state, Baltimore police announced Monday. Damaud Martin died July 2 at an Anne Arundel County group home that state regulators were in the process of closing down for multiple problems. State health officials are investigating whether Damaud received adequate care while living at the home, which was run by a company called LifeLine, but have cautioned against drawing any premature conclusions.
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BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | April 3, 2005
For a couple in their 40s, Lola and Don Durham have built an enviable nest egg: about $325,000 in investments, a Virginia home worth $375,000 and two Navy pensions. "I grew up dirt poor and still live a pretty simple life," said Don Durham, 44, who works in human resources for a state hospital. "Our kids think we're boring. We don't go out to eat, we do our own yard work, change our own oil in the cars. You see people in our income range buying a lot more, but we never had that thought process where we had to have a lot of toys."
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
On the night that 10-year-old Damaud Martin died at a troubled group home in Anne Arundel County, there were not enough staffers to handle the care specified for its severely disabled residents, according to the nurse on duty at the time. Mary Zelio, who was watching over Damaud and two other residents, said Friday that each of their care plans called for the home's operator, LifeLine Inc., to provide one-on-one nursing. But she was the only LifeLine nurse on duty in the apartment, one of four the state contractor has used for its group home for disabled foster children.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
A 19-year-old woman pleaded guilty in Howard County Circuit Court yesterday to having sexual contact with her 11-year-old foster brother.The woman, who initially was charged with second-degree rape, pleaded guilty to a third-degree sex offense. She faces a maximum sentence of 10 years. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 15.The incident occurred in the spring of 1995 when the woman was a foster child at a home in Savage. Court documents show that the woman was playing a game of "Truth or Dare" with her foster brother when the contact was made.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | March 17, 1993
To the 400 children who lived in their home over the past 50 years, they are Mom and Pop Rayman -- patient, kind and understanding. To the neighbors, they are the caretakers of Maryland's children.Dorothy and Elmer Rayman believe they are fortunate to have the best job in the world.The Raymans -- she's 71, he's 66 -- have welcomed children ranging in age from infants to teen-agers into their rambling six-bedroom rancher on Creek Boulevard in Pasadena. And they've added onto the house several times.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | December 10, 2006
Rachael stretched out a sheet of holiday wrapping paper and plopped a toy on top of it. She took a pair of scissors to the beige paper covered with wreaths and then began to wrap. "Sometimes the corners are tough to get just right," said the 13-year-old, whose last name is withheld to protect her privacy. She was determined to get it just right because the gift was for a foster child. And Rachael knows full well how much such a gesture can mean -- she is a foster child herself. "Sometimes foster kids need help, and not a lot of people are willing to give it," she said.
NEWS
By Stacey Patton and Stacey Patton,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
Life can be complicated for average teen-agers raised by two parents in a stable home. It becomes anguishing for foster children who are constantly shifted from home to home.Last night, 200 foster care teens were honored by the Baltimore City Department of Social Services for their tenacity and perseverance in overcoming obstacles during much of their adolescent lives.Sinora Dabney, 18, has been in foster care for six years. She had waited for years to be rescued from an abusive environment, but social workers had told her they could do nothing because they had seen no signs of physical abuse.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
A West River foster mother who was pursued by the Department of Social Services for child neglect at the same time she taught its classes for new foster parents has won a legal battle to have her name removed from a state database of neglectful parents. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Michael E. Loney upheld Friday an administrative law judge's decision that cleared Peggy Minner of wrongdoing. But she said she still feels victimized by the neglect accusations. "I am not relieved," said Minner, a foster parent for nearly six years.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | March 29, 1998
WHAT a difference a full treasury can make! The latest deficit drama for the city schools is smoothed over when the city finds extra funds (partly from unused snow removal money) and when brimming state coffers make it hard for legislators to deny extra funding for the state's most underfunded and overburdened school system.But money isn't everything. Good procedures -- working smarter, if you will -- can make a big difference, too.Case in point: In the past three years, there has been a sharp rise in the number of foster children who have been adopted into permanent homes -- from 376 in 1994 to about 600 in 1997.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Maryland's second-largest foster care provider failed to track background checks, training and other requirements for its foster parents, putting the children at risk, according to state officials who are moving to suspend new placements in its homes. Ian Patrick Hines, spokesman for the Department of Human Resources, which oversees foster care and adoptions in Maryland, confirmed that Hyattsville-based Contemporary Family Services, which has 232 parents and 157 foster children in its network, was notified of a pending sanction last week and that the agency's inspector general is investigating.
EXPLORE
September 9, 2011
On the eve of her 21st birthday, a young woman leaving the local Howard County foster care system after nine placements/homes was welcomed to her first apartment by eight local residents and two truckloads of used but sturdy furniture. Her housewarming was courtesy of Fostering Futures: An initiative of Voices for Children, Howard County's court-appointed special advocates. Fostering Futures Howard County seeks to develop a community network using the internet and other means to support youth aging out of foster care.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 4, 2009
Anthony and Iris Thorpe adopted their first child nearly 16 years ago, a 6-week-old girl whose mother had been given a diagnosis of HIV-positive. With two other children of their own, the couple figured that the infant made their family circle complete. Since then, the circle has ballooned, with 48 foster children, five adoptions and one foster child whose adoption is in the works. The Thorpes, of Port Deposit, have opened their arms to infants and toddlers from Baltimore who make up some of city's most disheartening child statistics: the offspring of drug-afflicted, HIV-infected parents.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | December 18, 2007
The Maryland Department of Human Resources has agreed to pay out $1.5 million to care for a Baltimore boy who suffered irreversible brain damage after he was abused by another child in the foster home where he was placed by the city Department of Social Services. The boy, Brandon Williams, who is now 5 years old and still unable to speak or walk, will receive an annuity of $80,000 a year for life to pay for his medical care, according to attorneys. The state has also agreed to pay the family $580,000 and guarantee that the boy will receive Medicaid assistance even though the annuity would have rendered him financially ineligible.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | December 10, 2006
Rachael stretched out a sheet of holiday wrapping paper and plopped a toy on top of it. She took a pair of scissors to the beige paper covered with wreaths and then began to wrap. "Sometimes the corners are tough to get just right," said the 13-year-old, whose last name is withheld to protect her privacy. She was determined to get it just right because the gift was for a foster child. And Rachael knows full well how much such a gesture can mean -- she is a foster child herself. "Sometimes foster kids need help, and not a lot of people are willing to give it," she said.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Special to The Sun | November 26, 2006
At first, Ilene Shaheed's decision to become an adoptive parent was as much about filling a personal need as improving a child's life. Her youngest was in college. She felt lonely in her suddenly empty nest. By the time the infant girl she adopted turned 6, she was ready for another child. This time, she chose to foster two little girls. Then another. And another. In all, Shaheed, of Pasadena, has fostered at least three dozen children - she's lost count - over the past 25 years. One of Shaheed's foster children is among the success stories featured in a radio spot the Anne Arundel County Department of Social Services will launch in coming weeks as part of an ambitious recruiting campaign.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
When 8-year-old Erica first came to live with Sherry Hulett, she refused to consider her room her own. She wanted Hulett to sleep on the floor to keep danger away. When Hulett adopted Erica, she wanted to change the girl's name to Elizabeth, but Erica wanted to keep her name. Social workers and counselors were available to help with these issues when Erica was a foster child. But after she was adopted, mother and daughter felt largely on their own. Thanks to a 1997 law pushed through by President Clinton, which gives states incentives through resources to facilitate the adoption of children from foster care, more kids in Maryland and around the country are being adopted.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart | April 3, 2005
For a couple in their 40s, Lola and Don Durham have built an enviable nest egg: about $325,000 in investments, a Virginia home worth $375,000 and two Navy pensions. "I grew up dirt poor and still live a pretty simple life," said Don Durham, 44, who works in human resources for a state hospital. "Our kids think we're boring. We don't go out to eat, we do our own yard work, change our own oil in the cars. You see people in our income range buying a lot more, but we never had that thought process where we had to have a lot of toys."
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