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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
Adoptions from foster care have risen sharply in Maryland over the past year, leaving state officials hopeful that they can find even more homes for children without them. The biggest increase was in Baltimore, where 514 children were adopted from the foster-care system between July 2000 and July 2001 - 40 percent more than the year before, state officials said yesterday. Over the past five years, the number adopted in Baltimore has more than tripled. The increases have been spurred by the federal Adoption and Safe Families Act, officials said, which in 1997 imposed new time limits for moving children into permanent homes and provided incentive payments for states that increased adoptions.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Maryland has won a five-year, $650 million federal grant that will give officials more flexibility to run the state's foster care program and reduce the number of children entering the system, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration said Tuesday. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant, which has been awarded to about 20 states so far, will allow Maryland to expand programs that help struggling families to avoid having their children turned over to foster care, state officials said.
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | November 10, 2007
Tamara Lee spends her days trying to fix broken families. As a state foster-care caseworker in Baltimore, she spends hours talking with abused and neglected children and asking gentle but probing questions to gauge health, happiness and healing. She is a human face in an enormous state agency tasked with caring for more than 10,000 children who have been removed from dysfunctional living conditions. In recent years, the Maryland Department of Human Resources has been criticized for mishandling implementation of a mammoth computer system, housing foster children in a downtown office building overnight and failing to provide proper medical and dental care.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
I'm writing in response to The Sun's article regarding the recent audit of Maryland's foster care agency ( "Oversight, placement of children faulted," Aug. 20). A close read of the story, however, shows it to be much more smoke than fire as the headline implies. First, auditors were not examining the safety or appropriateness of child placements. Rather, their finding related to the lack of certain documentation in the state's case files. Second, no evidence was presented that any of the 16 children in question suffered any harm at the hands of the relatives with whom they were placed.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | November 26, 1996
After its first six months, a Howard County courts program in which jurors can donate daily stipends to aid foster care children has not yielded nearly as much money as expected -- so officials are preparing a publicity blitz.Before the program began, county officials conducted a survey that indicated that 50 percent of jurors would be willing to donate their fees of $10 to $20 a day. But so far, court officials say, only about 25 percent of those called for jury duty opt to participate.Since May, only about $3,000 has been collected.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Nine-year-old Nadja arrived at Lynette York's North Baltimore doorstep last May with the clothes on her back and fear on her face.She'd been brought straight from school after social workers began to suspect that the lanky girl with the shy, hesitant smile was having problems in her foster home. A few of her belongings arrived the next day: a torn pair of sweat pants, a few old, pitiful toys and some underclothes.It was Nadja's third foster home in less than three years and York's first time being a foster parent, but the chemistry between the two seems genuine.
NEWS
May 20, 1991
Saving FamiliesEditor: The Maryland Department of Human Resources totally supports the concept of redirecting funds from foster-care placements to expand services to families that will prevent the need for out-of-home care, ("The Foster Care Solution," May 12).We are also staunch advocates for the expansion of the Intensive Family Services Program, which we began in 1986 and is now operating in 15 jurisdictions. This is not just a test program. It is a model which has received national recognition, including the American Public Welfare Association's innovative programming award, and has been replicated in a dozen other states.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
She has been an Air Force switchboard operator, a prison guard and the owner of a day-care center, but Lois Coby didn't find her true calling until a certain Thanksgiving dinner guest showed up at her door.Gerald Eley, a young man with a developmental disability, had no place to go for the holiday. Purely by chance, a social worker asked Coby if she would mind taking him in -- just for the long weekend.Nearly 12 years later, Gerald's photograph can be found in the family's photo albums -- along with pictures of at least two dozen foster-care children who discovered the love and comfort they needed.
NEWS
By Eileen Canzian and Eileen Canzian,Staff Writer | April 19, 1992
David first attempted suicide when he was 4 years old. One moment, he was playing with his Legos on the kitchen floor. The next, his fingers were wrapped around a paring knife as he went for his wrists.He'd been a ward of Baltimore's foster-care system nearly his whole life, and its efforts had brought him to this point: sobbing at the kitchen sink, his small face red with anguish, his blond curls damp with sweat, insisting that he wanted to die.He belonged to no one, and perhaps never would.
NEWS
June 20, 1991
Ps and QsEditor: President Bush uses quotas to get the votes of the prejudiced. In this respect he certainly knows his Ps and Qs.Incidentally when do the war crime trials against Saddam Hussein begin?Grayson Holland.Cockeysville.Skewed JusticeEditor: By refusing to review a 1990 ruling by a federal appeals court in the Oliver North case, the Reagan-Bush Supreme Court has made the prosecution of high ranking law-breakers in Washington increasingly difficult.A review of the court's decisions over recent years has shown a constant stripping away of the constitutional rights of those accused of common crimes, including the decision on May 30 to deny the influence of media publicity on jury convictions.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The article by Doug Donovan related to the legislative audit of the Maryland Department of Human Resources ( "Md. agency failed to monitor placement of foster children, audit says," Aug. 20) is missing some important information. It fails to point out the enormous strides made by DHR in recognizing that when children need out-of-home care, relatives are often the best option and that "place matters. " Kinship caregivers are most likely to be known by the children, live locally and minimize the disruption and trauma when they are removed from a parent or parents they love.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
DiJohn Thomas grew up bouncing between foster placements in Baltimore, never knowing how his peers, the next foster parents or staff at his next group home would respond to his being gay. Sometimes the adults responded negatively, he said, and his peers with their fists. "I've never been homeless to the point where I had to sleep outside, but there were times when I would leave group homes and wouldn't have anywhere to go but to a friend's house, sleeping on a couch," said Thomas, who is now 21 and first entered the foster system at age 6. "Most of the time, I would fight or people wouldn't like me just because they knew I was gay. " Advocates for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community say Thomas's experiences are all too common.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 6, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley, a presidential hopeful, has taken on yet another "pop issue," proposing that we provide foster care to several thousand unaccompanied Central American minors, lest they be sent to "certain death. " He has also championed abolition of capital punishment and the establishment of gay marriage, the Dream Act, and tax credits and fueling stations for electric vehicles whose technology is not ready for prime time. Is this latest pronouncement that of an instinctive demagogue or of a thoughtful statesman?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Maryland religious leaders issued a call for families to offer foster care to immigrant children from Central America as part of an effort to see that unaccompanied minors find shelter in homes rather than in barracks. Faith leaders who met with Gov. Martin O'Malley at the State House on Monday said as many as 2,000 children are expected to join more than 2,200 who have already found homes in Maryland, often with relatives, since the beginning of the year. Maryland has already taken in more of the immigrant children than all but a handful of large states.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A 30-second television spot for Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown focuses on his role as an adoptive father while getting in some plugs for the O'Malley administration's record on adoption and foster care. What the ad says : The ad shows Brown playing basketball with his son while the lieutenant governor says he never knew the impact adoption could have until Jonathan, now 13, came into his life. The ad shifts to an image of a gospel choir in an African-American church while Brown talks of bringing his message about the joys of adoption into churches on Sundays.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's campaign for governor released its fourth television ad Wednesday, continuing its media strategy of remaining relentlessly positive and building his personal appeal. The ad focuses on Brown's role as the adoptive parent of his son Jonathan. In it, the lieutenant governor talks about the joy of bringing a child into one's life and how Brown advocates for adoption when he visits churches on Sundays.  "Adoption and foster care can transform lives," Brown says.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Pointing to his own experience as an adoptive parent, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown vows if elected governor this fall to work to reduce the number of Maryland children in foster care. The plan, to be released Thursday by Brown and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, aims to trim 1,000 youths from nearly 6,000 in foster care now, continuing what they say has been a 43 percent decrease in the population in recent years. The proposal calls for a publicity campaign to recruit more adoptive families.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The article by Doug Donovan related to the legislative audit of the Maryland Department of Human Resources ( "Md. agency failed to monitor placement of foster children, audit says," Aug. 20) is missing some important information. It fails to point out the enormous strides made by DHR in recognizing that when children need out-of-home care, relatives are often the best option and that "place matters. " Kinship caregivers are most likely to be known by the children, live locally and minimize the disruption and trauma when they are removed from a parent or parents they love.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
Maryland's practice of shoring up its foster care budget by appropriating the Social Security survivor benefits of the children in its care is questionable and merits close scrutiny by legislators. Maryland is hardly alone in taking this step, and prohibiting it would present financial and logistical hurdles. But there is a strong case to be made that it is unfair to the children the state is supposed to be caring for. The state has an obligation to care for children who are abused or neglected, and the children are not expected to pay the state back.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Pointing to his own experience as an adoptive parent, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown vows if elected governor this fall to work to reduce the number of Maryland children in foster care. The plan, to be released Thursday by Brown and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, aims to trim 1,000 youths from nearly 6,000 in foster care now, continuing what they say has been a 43 percent decrease in the population in recent years. The proposal calls for a publicity campaign to recruit more adoptive families.
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