Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFossil
IN THE NEWS

Fossil

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | November 19, 2000
Close your eyes and think "fossil." What did you see -- images of prehistoric remains or hip clothing? If Fossil -- formerly just a watch and accessory company -- has its way, the latter will soon outshadow the former. The company has launched a modern clothing line described by spokeswoman Jennifer Pucci as "the love child" of two well-known labels. "Fossil has got all the basics of the Gap," she explains, "along with the punch that Diesel [clothing] gives you." That means the line has both button-down styles and funky fabrics like faux suede.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2014
What good news! The morning after more than 400,000 activists turned out to protest climate change, major philanthropies pledged to divest from fossil fuel ("Philanthropies, including Rockefellers, and investors pledge $50 billion fossil fuel divestment," Sept. 22), demonstrating how the tables are turning in this false controversy over the environment vs. the economy and jobs. The Rockefeller Fund and many others have recognized there is no question that the economy will fail miserably if we permit climate change to continue unabated.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 15, 2004
A wonderful Norman Rockwell illustration from the mid-1950s suggests just how strange abstract-impressionism once must have seemed. It depicts a perplexed gent standing in front of a painting covered with mad scrawls and doodles - obviously Rockwell's tongue-in-cheek caricature of a Jackson Pollock. Because the illustration appeared on the cover of the old Saturday Evening Post, there was no caption, nor need for one. It was a pure sight gag, and Rockwell could confidently assume the magazine's readers would put themselves in the place of his bewildered businessman, marveling at the incomprehensible turn taken by art's avant-garde.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Regarding Bob Bruninga's recent letter, "Carbon fees are a payback to Mother Nature (Aug. 19), carbon fees can also be payback to us, which would make them much more realistic politically. Rather than having the government tax fossil fuel corporations, which then pass the cost on to consumers, let's have a carbon pollution fee paid by fossil fuel companies and rebated monthly to every American. Taxpayers have already shelled out over $1 trillion for climate change disasters caused by carbon emissions, so fossil fuels owe us, big time.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Dan Davis hopes a giant pearl is inside a 12-pound oyster he found on a Southern California mountain, but scientists say the hiker's enthusiasm over his discovery has already produced a pearl of wisdom.In hope of finding a pearl, the 38-year-old salesman from suburban Northridge requested X-rays of his fossil at Holy Cross Medical Center in nearby Mission Hills.Hospital officials one-upped Mr. Davis by doing a CAT scan -- computerized axial tomography -- which a Los Angeles scientist said apparently was among the first times that such imaging had been used on a fossil millions of years old.Mr.
NEWS
By Luther Young | June 5, 1991
In one of the most productive periods of dinosaur fossil-hunting in Maryland since the 1880s, large dinosaur bones are coming to light, as keen-eyed amateurs join scientists in searching for evidence that the prehistoric creatures once roamed the area.The latest major find occurred May 19 at a well-known fossil site ina clay quarry near Laurel. Greenbelt resident Arnold Norden spotted a huge, 6-foot-long thigh bone that had been partially exposed and damaged by grading equipment."It was incredibly exciting, just to know this bone was being seen for the first time in 110 million years," said Mr. Norden, an experienced fossil collector who works as an aquatic ecologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Bob Pool and Bob Pool,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2004
LOS ANGELES - He makes no bones about it: This tiger's legit, not illicit. That's the way David Herskowitz defends the saber-toothed tiger fossil, found in the La Brea Tar Pits area, that he is selling today for the owner. It's true, of course, that private collectors have been banned from the tar pits for more than half a century. It's also true that the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, which maintains the prehistoric fossil collection at the tar pits, has been troubled in the past by thefts.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE AND DENNIS O'BRIEN | February 24, 2006
Scientists in China have discovered that some of our earliest mammalian ancestors managed to rise above the mouse-like creatures that scurried beneath the dinosaurs in pursuit of bugs. Paleontologists from Nanjing University and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History say they have found the 165 million-year-old fossil remains of a 20-inch-long semi-aquatic carnivore that looks like a cross between a beaver and a river otter. The fossil preserved impressions of fur and a flat, partly scaled tail, as well as webbing between the hind toes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2000
A rare fossil of a plumed reptile 75 million years older than the earliest known bird is challenging the popular idea that dinosaurs and modern fowl are birds of a feather. The tiny primordial creature, which predates all but the most primitive dinosaurs, had feathers like a bird, according to new research made public today in the journal Science. That has some questioning a widely held theory that birds are descended from the same dinosaur family that gave rise to Tyrannosaurus rex, Velociraptors and other toothsome denizens of a vanished world.
NEWS
By PETER GORNER and PETER GORNER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 9, 2006
Fossil hunters announced yesterday that they have found the oldest known tyrannosaur - an ancestor of the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex that had a bizarre combination of features, including a large, fragile crest on its head that would have attracted mates but made it vulnerable in a fight. The diminutive dinosaur, which lived 160 million years ago, stood 3.6 feet tall and measured 9.8 feet long. That was a far cry from T. rex, which came along 90 million years later and stood about 15 feet high and 40 feet long, weighed roughly 6 tons and had a large mouth that bristled with 6-inch-long, sharp, serrated teeth.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your Aug. 4 editorial ( "Cap and dividend" ) does not take into consideration the phenomenon of peak oil. I'm in favor of measures that help regular people - and government - make the transition to an energy future that can actually sustain us without poisoning the atmosphere. And I agree with your assertion that rising energy prices will be a "near certainty," but my reason is different. Peak oil refers to a peak in production, which might already be happening, and predicts higher energy prices as production falls.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
It makes no sense to invest billions of dollars into such a dead-end technology as oil pipelines which will be obsolete and of ever-declining value over the next dozen years as we burn up yet more and more of our declining fossil reserves ( "Keystone XL is one more hole in a sinking ship," Feb. 5). Instead, we should be investing in long-distance electric transmission lines to move our unlimited, renewable, 100 percent American electricity resources from where they are plentiful to where they are needed.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
A recent letter ( "Wind and solar aren't viable energy alternatives - and will never be," Aug. 5) misstates the facts in an attempt to attack wind energy. Wind power is already a mainstream energy source in the U.S., accounting for 35 percent of all newly added electric generating capacity over the last five years. Nine states now rely on wind for over 10 percent of their electricity, with Iowa and South Dakota generating 20 percent of their power from wind. The letter cites incorrect statistics on the government incentives awarded to wind energy.
NEWS
By Martin Weil and and Maggie Fazeli Fard, The Washington Post | August 5, 2013
From the banks of the Potomac River, in a region steeped in American history, a massive fossil was dug up last month that apparently can be traced back to a time long before this country's recorded history, a time deep in the world's prehistory. The fossil is the skull of a whale that is "approximately 15 million years old," said John Nance, the paleontology collections manager at the Calvert Marine Museum in Southern Maryland. The skull is about 6 feet long and is believed to weigh about 1,000 pounds.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
I enjoyed Mike Tidwell's article on phasing out carbon fuels in favor of renewable energy sources ("Forecast calls for pain,", Feb. 6). Taxing carbon is the best way to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. Having lived and traveled in Germany, I know that the U.S. is way behind in green living and sustainability. In Germany renewable energy is booming. Many people commute via mass transit, trains offer the option to go anywhere in Europe, and bicycling is very popular. Organic stores are everywhere, and everything is recycled so people don't consume as much.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | February 5, 2013
Not long after President Barack Obama promised to fight climate change in his inaugural address, temperatures soared to 70 last week in Baltimore - in late January. Our weather continues to be unrecognizable. Last summer was the hottest ever recorded at Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport. And across the 48 contiguous states, 2012 was the warmest on record by a huge margin. Globally, the heating trend - fueled mostly by the combustion of fossil fuels - proceeds apace.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
Dinosaur eggs aren't exactly a dime a dozen yet. But scientists have been finding lots of them - some uncovered singly, some still neatly arranged in their nests, or even beneath the fossil remains of their nesting mothers. Yesterday, a team from Canada and Taiwan reported they have identified a pair of 7-inch dinosaur eggs still tucked inside the fossilized pelvis of an "oviraptorosaurian" dinosaur discovered in China. Although some fossil eggs have revealed traces of embryos inside, these have not. But the find, reported in the journal Science, is shedding fresh light on the reproductive anatomy and egg-laying habits of dinosaurs, and on the evolutionary links between ancient reptiles and modern birds.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A team of scientists working in Argentin has found the closest thing yet to the granddaddy of all dinosaurs, an artful dodger that was about the size of a small dog and sprinted after prey on its hind legs.The creature, named Eoraptor by its discoverers, appeared only 1 or 2 million years after the first dinosaur evolved from a line of ancient reptiles."We're just a few steps away from the common ancestor" of all dinosaurs, Paul Sereno, a University of Chicago paleontologist, said at a news conference yesterday.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 25, 2012
Taking a cue from what they're learning in class, some Johns Hopkins public health students are spearheading a climate-conscious drive to get the university to divest itself of fossil fuel holdings. Just before taking off for the holiday break, leaders of the Refuel Our Future campaign delivered to JHU President Ronald J. Daniels' office a petition with more than 800 signatures on it calling on the university to rid its $2.7 billion endowment of fossil energy stocks in an effort to ease the predicted environmental and health impacts of climate change.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2012
In response to your letter to the editor on dinosaurs not being around 67 million years ago ("Bloody evidence undercuts dogmatic view of dinosaurs," Nov. 8): Yes, Dr. Mary Schweitzer's article in Dec. 6, 2010 Scientific American does talk about her finding preserved soft tissue in a fossil ... but it also says that fossil was 67 million years old. Elizabeth Reindollar Laurel
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.