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NEWS
May 31, 2013
I was very pleased to read your recent editorial on gun control opponents in Carroll County ("Carroll Co.'s nullification fantasy," May 24). Carroll Country is an integral part of the Baltimore metropolitan area, and despite the current state of denial our five county commissioners are in, Carroll is also connected to the Chesapeake Bay and regional environmental concerns. Despite the moat that the current commissioners have built around their make-believe fortress, the vast majority of Carroll County citizens are embarrassed by efforts such as the commissioners' recent, meaningless resolution to declare Carroll a weapons sanctuary; deprive public schools of funding while creating an unmanageable slush fund for fundamentalist home-schoolers; ignore state ethics law requirements for elected officials and attempt to avoid state planning mandates for responsible growth.
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NEWS
May 31, 2013
I was very pleased to read your recent editorial on gun control opponents in Carroll County ("Carroll Co.'s nullification fantasy," May 24). Carroll Country is an integral part of the Baltimore metropolitan area, and despite the current state of denial our five county commissioners are in, Carroll is also connected to the Chesapeake Bay and regional environmental concerns. Despite the moat that the current commissioners have built around their make-believe fortress, the vast majority of Carroll County citizens are embarrassed by efforts such as the commissioners' recent, meaningless resolution to declare Carroll a weapons sanctuary; deprive public schools of funding while creating an unmanageable slush fund for fundamentalist home-schoolers; ignore state ethics law requirements for elected officials and attempt to avoid state planning mandates for responsible growth.
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | September 10, 2000
SOON, THEY MAY be calling Maryland's historic State House "Fortress America." Thanks to the inflated egos of some of our elected lawmakers, there's a move afoot to turn this lovely, Georgian-style building in Annapolis into a high-security zone more like a prison than a working seat of democracy. Lock all the doors and windows to repel unwanted outsiders. Install sensitive metal detectors at the only access point. Seal off other entry passages. All that's missing will be a sandbagged observation nest in the State House's wooden dome and expert marksmen patrolling surrounding rooftops.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Herman G. "Hank" Tillman Jr., a retired Air Force colonel and pilot who flew in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and was one of Maryland's most decorated veterans, died Sunday of liver failure at his Chester home. He was 89. He was born in his immigrant grandparents' Anne Arundel County farmhouse, and later moved with his family to a home at Pontiac Avenue and Sixth Street in Brooklyn. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended the Johns Hopkins University at night and worked at Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s engineering department during the day. "As a kid, he was fascinated with flying.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 4, 1993
Evidently at least nine people in the world thought "Total Recall" was a great movie; "Fortress" appears to have been made by four of them for the other five.Like "Recall" it's a mega-violent dystopian fantasy about mind- and dream-control set in an underground metropolis overseen by an evil bad actor.Unlike "Recall," it didn't cost $80 million; $80 is more like it.What does $80 buy you these days?Not much.For one thing, it buys you Christopher Lambert, a far-fallen star whose appeal has always baffled me. Long ago, in "Greystoke," he was the only actor who played Tarzan who made Johnny Weissmuller look good.
FEATURES
By Alan Friedman and Alan Friedman,Contributing Writer | August 9, 1992
A beautiful yet disconcerting sight greets visitors approaching the low, rolling mountains that rise from the broad Lycos valley in western Turkey.The hillsides appear covered with snow, but the ridge is only a few hundred feet above the plains. The warm wind brings a thirst for water, not hot chocolate.Drawing closer, it becomes clear the ground itself is white. Stranger still, people in bathing suits are walking through pools of water that seem to jut out like frozen steps down the hillside.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 14, 2000
SHATILI, Georgia - In a high valley in the Caucasus Mountains, a place so remote it is cut off for six months each winter, an ancient towered fortress of stone juts heavenward like a bunch of clustered crystals. The inhabitants - 22 families with the same surname - are descendants of a highland ethnic group, the Khevsuri, who lived in and around the fortress for centuries. After decades in which they were exiled and their fortress fell into neglect, the Khevsuri have decided to repair their home and move back in. And, sensing that they have something special to share, they want to open part of it as a hotel for adventure tourists.
TRAVEL
By Gwinn Owens and Gwinn Owens,Special to the Sun | December 30, 2001
As we step off our hydrofoil from Athens, Greece, onto a pier, the scene before us is staggering, almost frightening. A quarter-mile off the Peloponnesian shore is a towering rock, shaped liked the prow of a 10-billion-ton ship. It seems to be bearing down on us, almost causing an impulse to get out of its way. This is Monemvasia, a nearly 1,000-foot-high, milelong formation that must have been the product of some tectonic cataclysm when the Earth was new. It juts improbably, vertically, out of the serene Aegean Sea, an oval fortress running east and west.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
The first American to die in combat in Afghanistan was a Central Intelligence Agency paramilitary officer killed Sunday during a bloody revolt by al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners in a mud-walled fortress near Mazar-e Sharif, the CIA said yesterday. The death of Johnny Micheal "Mike" Spann, 32, underscored the key role CIA paramilitary officers are playing in guiding U.S. attacks, interrogating prisoners and tracking Osama Bin Laden. The agency's deployment on the ground in Afghanistan is the largest since the war in Vietnam and signals a new, more assertive CIA role in battling terrorism, government officials and outside experts say. "This is not any longer a passive agency devoted to quietly collecting and analyzing data," said Ted Gup, a veteran journalist and author of a book on CIA operatives' deaths.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
Prime Retail Inc., the world's largest owner and operator of outlet malls, has agreed to sell four shopping centers for $240 million and to borrow up to $71 million to stabilize the cash-strapped company, reduce debt and eliminate the threat of bankruptcy. The Baltimore real estate investment trust (REIT) said yesterday that a real estate fund of Fortress Investment Fund LLC, an equity fund manager, will buy the centers and provide financing. Prime has agreed to give Fortress warrants to buy 1 million shares of Prime's common stock at an undisclosed price.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
"Grass is for Cows" is the motto of this producer, and it delivers a sauvignon blanc that is notable for its lack of grassy, herbal notes. Neither is it overly fig-flavored — the extreme some producers veer toward. It's a subtle, smoky, mineral-infused wine that reminds me very much of a good Graves from Bordeaux. It seems to be structured for longer aging than most California whites, and could develop very nicely with a year or two aging — something I rarely say about a sauvignon blanc.
NEWS
By Adam J. Schiavi | September 29, 2010
I am thinking about the events that occurred at the Johns Hopkins Hospital on Sept. 16. Apparently, a surgeon was providing an update to one of his patients about her condition; her son heard the conversation, pulled a semi-automatic handgun out of his pants and shot the surgeon on the spot, right there in one of the most famous hospitals in the world. All this because the shooter was apparently unhappy with the medical care provided for his mother. He then proceeded to use that gun to kill the patient and then himself, in the process terrorizing the hospital, its patients and visitors for the better part of a day. I interact with our health care system as a doctor at this hospital, as well as being a potential patient and visitor, and I am left with an uneasy feeling about what this means for our society.
NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | August 18, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. -- Once again, John Edwards' money is getting in the way of his message. His Democratic presidential campaign spent yesterday responding to a front-page Wall Street Journal report showing that a company Edwards worked for and has invested $16 million in, Fortress Investment Group, owns mortgage companies that have moved to foreclose on homeowners in hurricane-ravaged New Orleans. The newspaper identified 34 homes in foreclosure suits. Edwards, who made a fortune as a trial lawyer, worked for Fortress from late 2005 through 2006.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
World War II plane display -- The Collings Foundation's Wings of Freedom Tour will visit the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster. A B-17 Flying Fortress, B-24 Liberator and B-25 Mitchell will be open for walk-through tours from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday. Donations of $10 for adults and $5 for children younger than 12 are requested. 410-688-7412. Flights are available for tax-deductible donations of $425 for the B-17 or B-24, and $325/$400 for the B-25; 978-562-9182 for flight reservations.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
AMERICA'S FREE and open society, which has long been the envy of the world, is being stolen from us piece by piece in return for the often false promise of greater security. The latest and most appalling example is the absurd walling off of the nation's capital in response to last weekend's heightened terror alert. Federal officials have offered since then a series of conflicting rationales for sounding that alert. But none of them related to a threat against the U.S. Capitol or the Treasury Building.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2004
In 1958, a speculator thought long-abandoned Fort Carroll, seven miles south of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, would make an impressive gambling den. How many casinos, after all, have 10-foot-thick granite walls and gunports? But 46 years after Benjamin N. Eisenberg, a local lawyer, bought the bastion, hoping to turn it into a slots venue, it remains a ghost fort that's being overrun by trees, vines and weeds. Hundreds of sea gulls, egrets and herons have taken possession of the pre-Civil War fortress.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Shares of struggling Prime Retail Inc. more than doubled yesterday after a New York-based investment company said it had offered to buy the outlet mall owner for $66.2 million. Baltimore-based Prime turned down the offer from Fortress Investment Group LLC, which in June proposed paying 20 cents a share for Prime's common shares, a premium of nearly 70 percent at the time. Yesterday, shares of Prime, which traded for as much as $16 in 1997, closed at 9 cents, up 125 percent from 4 cents a share.
NEWS
By McClatchy Newspapers | August 18, 2007
RALEIGH, N.C. -- Once again, John Edwards' money is getting in the way of his message. His Democratic presidential campaign spent yesterday responding to a front-page Wall Street Journal report showing that a company Edwards worked for and has invested $16 million in, Fortress Investment Group, owns mortgage companies that have moved to foreclose on homeowners in hurricane-ravaged New Orleans. The newspaper identified 34 homes in foreclosure suits. Edwards, who made a fortune as a trial lawyer, worked for Fortress from late 2005 through 2006.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2004
Diana Hunt Diederich Blake, who was well known in Baltimore art circles and managed works of her artist father, died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 73. The longtime resident of Bolton Hill had moved recently to the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She inherited historic and artistic material, and devoted much of her energy to that and to the Maryland Institute College of Art, where she earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in 1973.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
Chemical warfare agent sensors. Blast-resistant windows. Safe rooms for sheltering if anthrax seeps in through the ductwork. Coming to an office near you? Building-protection companies and consultants are trying to reach beyond military defense to the commercial market, which has shown more interest in security after Sept. 11, 2001, but hasnt battened down as much as the federal government. Now that access-control measures such as badge readers are fairly common, the protection industry hopes building owners are ready for higher-tech and higher-priced products.
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