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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Considering what Navy's Keenan Reynolds had done to Hawaii the week before, the South Alabama football team couldn't be blamed for focusing its defensive efforts on the sophomore quarterback Saturday. But the Jaguars forgot to account for Darius Staten. The senior slotback had seven carries for a career-high 127 yards and one touchdown to propel the Midshipmen to a 42-14 rout before an announced 33,086 at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. Navy scored 32 unanswered points over the final three quarters as a defense missing three starters shut out South Alabama for nearly 40 minutes.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 1997
Last Sunday, when the jury of the quadrennial Van Cliburn International Piano Competition announced the winners, the news was met by the usual chorus of critical dismay: The Cliburn rewarded pianists who bored and ignored those who didn't.I was among those unhappy with the decision. I had just made my first visit to Fort Worth, Texas, for the finals of the competition, in which six pianists perform 12 concertos over three evenings. The three pianists I thought most interesting were not those deemed worthy of medals by the Cliburn jurors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aman Batheja and Aman Batheja,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
FORT WORTH, Texas - David Neeley hated to think about those boxes in his storage room, all filled with useful items collecting dust. There was a vacuum cleaner in good condition and a pasta maker, among other things. "I found more and more items that are either duplicates of things I already have or that I just don't use," Neeley said. "I thought, `I need to find a home for these things, not just throw them away.'" After looking through some of those boxes in his Irving, Texas, house a few months ago, Neeley learned of Freecycle (www.
NEWS
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 10, 1994
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Noting what he called a breakdown in America's religious and family values, U.S. District Judge David Belew Jr. has ordered a woman and her four children to attend Sunday church services for a year as part of a probation agreement in a drug case."
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | December 13, 1994
FORT WORTH, Texas -- The publicity brochures describe him as an American Indian warrior, shaman, artist and storyteller.However, Marrion Dwayne Three Hawks, also known as Marrion Edwards, may have lured as many as 10 women to his art gallery in the historic Fort Worth Stockyards or to his nearby studio with promises that he could heal them with ancient American Indian ceremonies, according to police.Instead, he apparently sexually assaulted them in the name of native religion, police say.He remains under scrutiny by officials trying to determine where he obtained the American Indian artifacts and feathers -- believed to be federally protected eagle feathers -- used in the assaults.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | March 24, 1993
FORT WORTH -- A Dallas teen-ager convicted of murde Monday in the 1991 Skinhead hate slaying of an African-American warehouse worker was given 10 years' probation yesterday.Prosecutors had asked the all-white Tarrant County jury to sentence Christopher William Brosky, 17, to life in prison for his role in the drive-by shooting of Donald Thomas, 32.The ruling elated Brosky and his family, but it shocked survivors and friends of Mr. Thomas."I feel a lot better than I did yesterday," said Brosky, who wept and embraced his mother and girlfriend when the jurors returned their sentencing decision after 2 1/2 hours of deliberation.
NEWS
March 3, 1993
CLINT Eastwood's "Unforgiven," which relentlessly deglamorizes the heroic myth of the Old West, already seemed destined for classic status before it was nominated for a bevy of Oscars this year.The film, purportedly based on a real historical figure, stars Mr. Eastwood as William Munny, a reformed gunslinger who teams up with a black sidekick named Ditty, played by Morgan Freeman, to carry out a contract killing in a godforsaken prairie town.Until recently, black cowboys were virtually invisible in American Westerns.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
The neighbors don't suspect a thing. They have no way of knowing that the two-story house built in the 1970s in southwest Fort Worth, Texas, with a vaguely French facade is being transformed from within. The unremarkable brown brick exterior masks a sleek white minimalist interior. Room by room, surgeons Al and Miky Rios are renovating their home. Gone are the dark oak and teak floors, the mustard-colored walls, the warren of small rooms and cottage-cheese ceilings. In their place are floors of light yellow bamboo, white walls and sliding panels of sand-blasted glass.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2003
FORT WORTH, Texas - There have been two major golf championships played at Colonial Country Club since the course was opened in 1936, but neither was as major an event as the one being held here this week. Neither Craig Wood's victory in the 1941 U.S. Open nor Meg Mallon's win 50 years later in the U.S. Women's Open can match Annika Sorenstam's appearance in this year's Colonial tournament, which begins today. By becoming the first woman to play in a PGA Tour event since native Texan Babe Zaharias teed it up in the 1945 Los Angeles Open, Sorenstam has caused a swirl of excitement that reverberates far outside the gates of this stately club.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
FORT WORTH, Texas -- In the year leading to today's trial of Diane Zamora, lawyers on both sides have proclaimed that it would be extremely difficult, if not impossible, for the defendant in such a high-profile murder case to receive a fair trial in her hometown.But the prosecution's attempt to move the trial failed, and the defense has failed in its efforts to corral some of the publicity.So Zamora's fate will be decided by seven men and five women -- all of whom said they had heard, seen or read of the case.
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