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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2003
Again declaring that "Iraq is now the central front in the war on terror," President Bush paid tribute yesterday to some of the American soldiers who swept Saddam Hussein from power. "You took the Saddam Hussein International Airport, you seized his palaces, and you led the fighting into Baghdad the day the statue of a dictator was pulled down," Bush told cheering troops of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Stewart, Ga. Judging by the constant cheers that punctuated Bush's televised remarks, yesterday was a time to be deliriously happy for the troops in the division and their families.
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NEWS
June 6, 2013
Second Lt. Stephen James Peck, son of William and Donna Peck of Abingdon, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy on May 25. A 2009 Bel Air High School graduate, Peck concentrated his studies at West Point in information technology. He also attended the Naval Academy in Annapolis for one semester, and he completed Air Assault School in his sophomore year. He was recently commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army within the armor branch and following several months of officer training in Ft. Benning, Ga., will report to Fort Stewart, Ga., for his first assignment.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
About 300 Maryland National Guard members from three military police units will leave tomorrow for Fort Stewart, Ga., as part of the nation's homeland defense operation. Despite the hardship of a tour that takes them from home and families, more than 100 guard members re-enlisted for the mission, said Lt. Barbara Maher, a spokeswoman for the Maryland National Guard. "I wouldn't have been able to look myself in the mirror knowing I walked away from my soldiers," said Robert Chard, a platoon sergeant who re-enlisted.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | June 11, 2007
Any time Army Spc. Bruce Bentley leaves Fort Meade to see his wife and children in Lancaster, Pa., he sits at his computer and types in dozens of facts about his trip, including where he's going, what he's driving, how many times he's stopping, and when he's leaving and returning. The computer program, called TRIPS, then assigns Bentley's journey a risk level, displays stories of soldiers who died on similar ones and recommends ways to reduce the danger. Soldiers such as Bentley have logged on to the internal Army Web site more than 2 million times as part of a far-reaching campaign to curb the number of service members dying in road crashes.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
Second Lt. Stephen James Peck, son of William and Donna Peck of Abingdon, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy on May 25. A 2009 Bel Air High School graduate, Peck concentrated his studies at West Point in information technology. He also attended the Naval Academy in Annapolis for one semester, and he completed Air Assault School in his sophomore year. He was recently commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army within the armor branch and following several months of officer training in Ft. Benning, Ga., will report to Fort Stewart, Ga., for his first assignment.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 15, 2003
WASHINGTON - Most of the war-weary soldiers of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division, which spearheaded the invasion of Iraq, will remain in the troubled country indefinitely, division officials announced yesterday, though Pentagon officials said they still hope to have the entire division home by the fall, as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told Congress last week. Richard Olson, a spokesman at Fort Stewart, Ga., where the 16,500-soldier division is based, said two of its three brigades will not be returning home in August and September as scheduled.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac | November 18, 1990
HINESVILLE, Ga. -- A few weeks ago, newlywed Jane Efinger-Hayden mailed her husband an 18-inch artificial Christmas tree strung with fake pearls and dangling hearts and an ornament that says it all: "Our First Christmas Together."The last time the 32-year-old Mrs. Efinger-Hayden saw her husband was at noon on Aug. 24 through a fence at a Savannah, Ga., airfield as Sgt. 1st Class Daniel R. Hayden departed for Saudi Arabia. Hours earlier, the feisty secretary had a priest bless Sergeant Hayden's St. Christopher medal and dog tags: There was no reason, she figured, not to cover the bases.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1990
HINESVILLE, Ga. -- What's most noticeable about Hinesville is something that's missing from it: men.It's the women in this south Georgia town who referee Little League and soccer. It's women who are coaching expectant mothers through labor. It's women who line up at the grocery stores, banks and gas stations.The local playhouse is offering the female version of "The Odd Couple." Under consideration for future productions: "Steel Magnolias" and "Nunsense," which feature largely female casts.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | June 11, 2007
Any time Army Spc. Bruce Bentley leaves Fort Meade to see his wife and children in Lancaster, Pa., he sits at his computer and types in dozens of facts about his trip, including where he's going, what he's driving, how many times he's stopping, and when he's leaving and returning. The computer program, called TRIPS, then assigns Bentley's journey a risk level, displays stories of soldiers who died on similar ones and recommends ways to reduce the danger. Soldiers such as Bentley have logged on to the internal Army Web site more than 2 million times as part of a far-reaching campaign to curb the number of service members dying in road crashes.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2004
HINESVILLE, Ga. - He took the money. Sgt. Matt Novak admits that much. He and several fellow soldiers could not resist after discovering nearly $200 million in $100 bills sealed inside a gardener's cottage in a Baghdad palace complex last spring. "Millions of dollars makes a lot of things go through your mind," Novak told a military review board in Georgia in December after confessing that he and the others had stolen about $12 million. A year after U.S. soldiers discovered about $760 million of ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's cash hidden in several cottages, the case still raises questions.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
DAMASCUS - Tears rolled down Eric Irizarry's cheeks yesterday as he stood on a soggy lawn in the fog and cold and stared at the idling bus carrying his son off to war. His wife, Lisa, and three remaining boys were at his side, one holding a poster that read "We love you Carlos." Carlos Irizarry's unit, Bravo Company of the 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment of the Maryland Army National Guard, was pulling out from the Damascus Community Recreation Center, bound for months of advanced training at Fort Stewart, Ga., before heading to Iraq in June for a year's duty.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2004
HINESVILLE, Ga. - He took the money. Sgt. Matt Novak admits that much. He and several fellow soldiers could not resist after discovering nearly $200 million in $100 bills sealed inside a gardener's cottage in a Baghdad palace complex last spring. "Millions of dollars makes a lot of things go through your mind," Novak told a military review board in Georgia in December after confessing that he and the others had stolen about $12 million. A year after U.S. soldiers discovered about $760 million of ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's cash hidden in several cottages, the case still raises questions.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 2003
Again declaring that "Iraq is now the central front in the war on terror," President Bush paid tribute yesterday to some of the American soldiers who swept Saddam Hussein from power. "You took the Saddam Hussein International Airport, you seized his palaces, and you led the fighting into Baghdad the day the statue of a dictator was pulled down," Bush told cheering troops of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Stewart, Ga. Judging by the constant cheers that punctuated Bush's televised remarks, yesterday was a time to be deliriously happy for the troops in the division and their families.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 15, 2003
WASHINGTON - Most of the war-weary soldiers of the Army's 3rd Infantry Division, which spearheaded the invasion of Iraq, will remain in the troubled country indefinitely, division officials announced yesterday, though Pentagon officials said they still hope to have the entire division home by the fall, as Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told Congress last week. Richard Olson, a spokesman at Fort Stewart, Ga., where the 16,500-soldier division is based, said two of its three brigades will not be returning home in August and September as scheduled.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
About 300 Maryland National Guard members from three military police units will leave tomorrow for Fort Stewart, Ga., as part of the nation's homeland defense operation. Despite the hardship of a tour that takes them from home and families, more than 100 guard members re-enlisted for the mission, said Lt. Barbara Maher, a spokeswoman for the Maryland National Guard. "I wouldn't have been able to look myself in the mirror knowing I walked away from my soldiers," said Robert Chard, a platoon sergeant who re-enlisted.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac | November 18, 1990
HINESVILLE, Ga. -- A few weeks ago, newlywed Jane Efinger-Hayden mailed her husband an 18-inch artificial Christmas tree strung with fake pearls and dangling hearts and an ornament that says it all: "Our First Christmas Together."The last time the 32-year-old Mrs. Efinger-Hayden saw her husband was at noon on Aug. 24 through a fence at a Savannah, Ga., airfield as Sgt. 1st Class Daniel R. Hayden departed for Saudi Arabia. Hours earlier, the feisty secretary had a priest bless Sergeant Hayden's St. Christopher medal and dog tags: There was no reason, she figured, not to cover the bases.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
DAMASCUS - Tears rolled down Eric Irizarry's cheeks yesterday as he stood on a soggy lawn in the fog and cold and stared at the idling bus carrying his son off to war. His wife, Lisa, and three remaining boys were at his side, one holding a poster that read "We love you Carlos." Carlos Irizarry's unit, Bravo Company of the 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment of the Maryland Army National Guard, was pulling out from the Damascus Community Recreation Center, bound for months of advanced training at Fort Stewart, Ga., before heading to Iraq in June for a year's duty.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 18, 2002
The Army is investigating the case of a Parkville-based National Guard member who was reported absent without leave after her battalion was assigned to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a military official said this week. Nancy Sophia Fortune of Baltimore failed to join her battalion at Fort Stewart, Ga. The unit was sent to Cuba to guard Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners who began arriving from Afghanistan, said Col. Howard S. Freedlander, a spokesman for the Maryland National Guard. A five-year veteran and payroll specialist at the Parkville Armory, Fortune was reported missing two weeks ago at Fort Stewart, Freedlander said.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1990
HINESVILLE, Ga. -- What's most noticeable about Hinesville is something that's missing from it: men.It's the women in this south Georgia town who referee Little League and soccer. It's women who are coaching expectant mothers through labor. It's women who line up at the grocery stores, banks and gas stations.The local playhouse is offering the female version of "The Odd Couple." Under consideration for future productions: "Steel Magnolias" and "Nunsense," which feature largely female casts.
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