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By James H. Bready | June 28, 1995
Because of an editing error, an article on the June 28 Other Voices page gave the wrong number of Military Intelligence Training Center classes held during World War II at Fort Ritchie.A total of 24 classes were trained, one per month.The Evening Sun regrets the error.FORT RITCHIE: now you see it, now you . . . well, it was out there. Maryland's official road map shows it, on the north end of South Mountain. But then the military emits another mist, and -- Ritchie, what's become of you?What we're looking for is some 600 acres of treed rocks, improved by two artificial lakes, a bumpy parade ground, 150 or so buildings and, on a weekday, several thousand people, most of them in uniform.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
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NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 23, 1991
FORT RITCHIE -- While President Bush pondered the events in the Persian Gulf at Camp David, the issue was also on the mind of U.S. Army Spc. 4 Leonard Jackson, stationed just a few miles away at Fort Ritchie in rural northern Washington County.The two men came to different conclusions.While President Bush decided that U.S. military action in the Middle East would be fair and just, Specialist Jackson, a military policeman and a Muslim, did not want to be associated with any part of the war, and he filed for discharge from the Army as a conscientious objector.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
FREDERICK — Police in Frederick County say a Smithburg man has been charged with driving under the influence and other charges after his vehicle struck a Maryland State Police patrol car. Police say 19-year-old Robert John Gery hit the patrol car parked on Raven Rock Road near Fort Ritchie at just after 4:30 a.m. Saturday. The trooper driving the patrol car sustained non-life-threatening injuries.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1998
CASCADE -- After more than 70 years as a military post, Fort Ritchie symbolically closed a chapter on Army life yesterday evening with a formal ceremony in which the U.S. Garrison flag was rolled up for the final time.Armed with deck chairs and blankets, cameras and coolers, thousands of people staked out places on a field in a center of the fort to watch the 5 p.m. inactivation of the small, cozy military post in picturesque Cascade, which those who live in the area say has grown on them over the years.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | March 26, 1995
Feel for the people of Cascade, the tiny Western Maryland community in the Catoctin Mountains, near the Pennsylvania border, who, if the Pentagon has its way, are about to see their economic lifeblood drain away with the proposed closure of the local Army base at Fort Ritchie.It is one of five military installations tagged to close their gates in Maryland in the fourth round of military base closures since the end of the Cold War.Maryland also stands to lose the Naval Surface Warfare Centers at Annapolis and White Oak; the Army Publications Distribution Center in Middle River; and the Naval Medical Research Institute in Bethesda.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
The Maryland Attorney General's office is reviewing the planned sale of the former Fort Ritchie Army base in Western Maryland to a Columbia-based commercial developer, after community members raised concerns about the $5 million to $9 million transaction. PenMar Development Corp., a state agency created to redevelop the closed base in the mountains of Washington County, has a contract to sell the 637-acre property to Corporate Office Properties Trust. COPT, which plans 1.7 million square feet of office space and 673 homes, would pay the lower amount if the development generates the anticipated 1,500 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | October 6, 2006
The long-delayed sale of the former Fort Ritchie Army base closed yesterday, paving the way for a Columbia-based commercial developer to build a mixed-use development that could bring in 4,500 jobs to Western Maryland in 10 to 15 years. Corporate Office Properties Trust, which has had the 591-acre base under contract for more than two years, said it acquired the property for $5 million from PenMar Development Corp., the state agency created to redevelop the closed base in the mountains of Washington County.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
CASCADE - The former Fort Ritchie Army post in Washington County will be retooled into something new - what, though, isn't clear - by a Columbia developer of suburban offices filled with federal government agencies and their contractors. PenMar Development Corp., the redevelopment authority for the post, signed a sales agreement with Corporate Office Properties Trust yesterday, though both sides have 90 days to reconsider. Corporate Office Properties would not publicly reveal its plans for the site, about 600 acres in the Western Maryland mountaintop community of Cascade.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
A Columbia office developer will pay from $5 million to $9 million for the former Fort Ritchie Army post in Western Maryland, raising criticism about the price and process. PenMar Development Corp. released yesterday the terms of a contract signed Monday to sell the approximately 600-acre property in the mountains of Washington County to Corporate Office Properties Trust. The final price depends on the number of jobs that will be created. In addition, the deal requires the company to spend $7.5 million on infrastructure and other improvements, though Corporate Office Properties says it expects to shell out tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | October 6, 2006
The long-delayed sale of the former Fort Ritchie Army base closed yesterday, paving the way for a Columbia-based commercial developer to build a mixed-use development that could bring in 4,500 jobs to Western Maryland in 10 to 15 years. Corporate Office Properties Trust, which has had the 591-acre base under contract for more than two years, said it acquired the property for $5 million from PenMar Development Corp., the state agency created to redevelop the closed base in the mountains of Washington County.
NEWS
February 1, 2006
Rockville: Jewish Day School Smith family donates $10 million The Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School received a $10 million gift this week that will go to supporting a variety of programs at the private Rockville school. The gift from Robert and Clarice Smith and Robert and Arlene Kogod -- the children of a major benefactor, Charles E. Smith -- will be given to the school in $1 million increments each year. The gift is in addition to a $5 million pledge the family made three years ago. Liz Bowie western maryland: black bears DNR is seeking to expand hunt Black bear hunting would expand to include all of Allegany and Garrett counties under proposed regulations the state Department of Natural Resources is considering for the 2006 and 2007 seasons.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
The Maryland Attorney General's office is reviewing the planned sale of the former Fort Ritchie Army base in Western Maryland to a Columbia-based commercial developer, after community members raised concerns about the $5 million to $9 million transaction. PenMar Development Corp., a state agency created to redevelop the closed base in the mountains of Washington County, has a contract to sell the 637-acre property to Corporate Office Properties Trust. COPT, which plans 1.7 million square feet of office space and 673 homes, would pay the lower amount if the development generates the anticipated 1,500 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
A Columbia office developer will pay from $5 million to $9 million for the former Fort Ritchie Army post in Western Maryland, raising criticism about the price and process. PenMar Development Corp. released yesterday the terms of a contract signed Monday to sell the approximately 600-acre property in the mountains of Washington County to Corporate Office Properties Trust. The final price depends on the number of jobs that will be created. In addition, the deal requires the company to spend $7.5 million on infrastructure and other improvements, though Corporate Office Properties says it expects to shell out tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
CASCADE - The former Fort Ritchie Army post in Washington County will be retooled into something new - what, though, isn't clear - by a Columbia developer of suburban offices filled with federal government agencies and their contractors. PenMar Development Corp., the redevelopment authority for the post, signed a sales agreement with Corporate Office Properties Trust yesterday, though both sides have 90 days to reconsider. Corporate Office Properties would not publicly reveal its plans for the site, about 600 acres in the Western Maryland mountaintop community of Cascade.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
CASCADE - When the Army cleared out of Fort Ritchie in 1998, local officials envisioned a high-tech business park springing up in its place and restoring hundreds of well-paying jobs to these remote mountains in Western Maryland. But six years later, the former base looks much as it did when the soldiers left: a ghost town of darkened buildings, rutted roads and drooping weeds. To be sure, base closures are never tidy. Environmental ills, complex regulations and quarrels among developers, local officials and the military often combine to stall their rebirth.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
CASCADE - When the Army cleared out of Fort Ritchie in 1998, local officials envisioned a high-tech business park springing up in its place and restoring hundreds of well-paying jobs to these remote mountains in Western Maryland. But six years later, the former base looks much as it did when the soldiers left: a ghost town of darkened buildings, rutted roads and drooping weeds. To be sure, base closures are never tidy. Environmental ills, complex regulations and quarrels among developers, local officials and the military often combine to stall their rebirth.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1997
A General Assembly committee has approved a $1.5 million loan from Maryland's "Sunny Day" economic development fund to help finance a union headquarters' move from Washington, D.C., to Fort Ritchie in Washington County.The International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftsmen will move 200 administrative, training and research jobs to Fort Ritchie, the western Maryland base that is being eased out of its military duties by the U.S. Defense Department.The $1.5 million Sunny Day loan will be funneled through PenMar, a nonprofit corporation that is redeveloping Fort Ritchie.
NEWS
October 22, 2000
AFTER EIGHT YEARS of achieving virtually nothing for the people of the 6th Congressional District, incumbent Roscoe G. Bartlett deserves a swift retirement by the voters. Western Maryland is worthy of more than dime-store displays of patriotism and constitutional homilies from the 74-year-old former college professor and millionaire Frederick landowner. His conservative cant and reactionary rhetoric may strike a responsive chord in many constituents of his six-county district. But that is not effective, active political representation.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1999
CASCADE -- Only a few geese and ducks strut across the parade ground at Fort Ritchie these days.The picturesque former Army base, where spies trained during World War II, closed in September, leaving a hole in the life of this small Washington County town near the Pennsylvania border. The tennis courts, bowling alley and golf course are empty, as are most of the stone and frame buildings.Now, locals and the Pentagon are forming battle lines over the fate of the 638-acre installation in a valley between the Blue Ridge and Catoctin mountains.
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