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By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2003
FORT MONROE, Va. - Maj. Gen. Jerry Grizzle knows destruction. His troops guarded the shattered Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City after domestic terrorists bombed it in 1995, killing 168 men, women and children. He ran recovery operations in 1999 after the worst tornadoes in decades whipsawed through Oklahoma, killing 44 and destroying thousands of homes. Grizzle knows destruction's look, taste and smell. But neither his military training nor his personal experiences, he admits, can quite prepare him to handle the chaos and carnage that would result if terrorists detonate a nuclear weapon in Los Angeles, spray nerve agent over Atlanta or spread smallpox throughout the Midwest.
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December 18, 2011
Robert and Rosemary Miller, of Catonsville, announce the marriage of their daughter, Carolyn Marie Miller, to Sean Lawrence McEwen, son of Lawrence McEwen, of Thousand Oaks, Calif., and Theresa McEwen, of San Carlos, Calif. The bride and groom serve as captains in the Army. The Rev. Sousa officiated at the May 29 ceremony in St. Mary Star of the Sea Church, Fort Monroe, Hampton, Va. Sarah Forster was maid of honor with Patrick McEwen, brother of the groom, as best man. Since returning from a honeymoon in Athens, Greece, the couple is residing in Williamsburg, Va.
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December 18, 2011
Robert and Rosemary Miller, of Catonsville, announce the marriage of their daughter, Carolyn Marie Miller, to Sean Lawrence McEwen, son of Lawrence McEwen, of Thousand Oaks, Calif., and Theresa McEwen, of San Carlos, Calif. The bride and groom serve as captains in the Army. The Rev. Sousa officiated at the May 29 ceremony in St. Mary Star of the Sea Church, Fort Monroe, Hampton, Va. Sarah Forster was maid of honor with Patrick McEwen, brother of the groom, as best man. Since returning from a honeymoon in Athens, Greece, the couple is residing in Williamsburg, Va.
NEWS
By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2003
FORT MONROE, Va. - Maj. Gen. Jerry Grizzle knows destruction. His troops guarded the shattered Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City after domestic terrorists bombed it in 1995, killing 168 men, women and children. He ran recovery operations in 1999 after the worst tornadoes in decades whipsawed through Oklahoma, killing 44 and destroying thousands of homes. Grizzle knows destruction's look, taste and smell. But neither his military training nor his personal experiences, he admits, can quite prepare him to handle the chaos and carnage that would result if terrorists detonate a nuclear weapon in Los Angeles, spray nerve agent over Atlanta or spread smallpox throughout the Midwest.
NEWS
By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 14, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Access to Fort Eustis, Fort Monroe and Fort Story is being restricted for the first time in memory to combat potential terrorism incidents. The Army-directed changes include 24-hour manning of gates, limited civilian entry and mandatory vehicle registration for those living or working on the bases. All Army bases open to the public are affected. The new security precautions would put Army bases on roughly the same security footing as local Air Force and Navy bases.
NEWS
By R.W. Rogers and R.W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 28, 2002
FORT EUSTIS, Va. - Not long ago, military officials looked at their bases and didn't like what they saw. Decrepit housing and failing electric grids, storm drains and sewage plants were the rule. Years of robbing utilities to pay for readiness had reduced the bases to tatters. Improvement was not on the horizon. The Defense Department decided in 1998 that the status quo needed an overhaul. The solution turned out to be what the military had defended for more than 200 years: free enterprise.
NEWS
July 21, 2003
Thomas Randolph Bender Sr., a longtime Severna Park resident who owned a nursery, died July 14 of cancer at Sunrise Assisted Living Center in Severna Park. He was 86. Born and raised in Cumberland, Mr. Bender earned a bachelor's degree in horticulture from the University of Maryland. He opened Bender Nursery in 1962 and ran the Severna Park garden center for 25 years. Azaleas were among his favorite plants. Mr. Bender served in the Army from 1940 to 1945 in the coastal artillery unit at Fort Monroe in Newport News, Va. The unit was responsible for protecting Hampton Roads and its naval base from possible attack by enemy submarines during World War II. Mr. Bender was an active member of St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Severna Park, where he was a pastoral home visitor and an usher.
NEWS
June 10, 1996
William J. Baroody Jr.,58, who headed two prestigious Washington research centers, died of a lung ailment Saturday.He became president of the American Enterprise Institute, a leading conservative think tank, in 1978, succeeding his father, William J. Baroody Sr., who had held the post for 16 years.He left AEI in 1986 amid disputes over business management and assertions by some conservatives that the organization had become too politically centrist.From 1981 until 1994, he was chairman of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
Robert H. Fisher, a retired partner in a paper products distribution company and World War II veteran, died of complications from heart surgery Friday at Washington Hospital Center. The Severna Park resident was 84. Mr. Fisher was born in Baltimore and raised on Mount Holly Street. He was 1937 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1940 from the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he served as an Army sergeant assigned to mine harbor approaches at New London, Conn.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | July 5, 1998
100 years agoRear-Admiral Ramsay, president of the dry dock commission, is not greatly impressed with Round Bay as a place for a dock or naval station, citing the need for a 30-foot channel all the way from the bay. -- The Sun, June 28, 1898.Forty-one large Fourth of July boxes intended for the Annapolis soldiers of Companies A and G, 1st Regiment, were shipped and expected to arrive at Fort Monroe today. J. Edward Abbott accompanied the shipment. -- The Sun, July 3, 1898.Last evening, the stable and cornhouse of ex-Judge Henry A. Tydings of North Severn, including four horses, were destroyed by fire.
NEWS
By R.W. Rogers and R.W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 28, 2002
FORT EUSTIS, Va. - Not long ago, military officials looked at their bases and didn't like what they saw. Decrepit housing and failing electric grids, storm drains and sewage plants were the rule. Years of robbing utilities to pay for readiness had reduced the bases to tatters. Improvement was not on the horizon. The Defense Department decided in 1998 that the status quo needed an overhaul. The solution turned out to be what the military had defended for more than 200 years: free enterprise.
NEWS
By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 14, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Access to Fort Eustis, Fort Monroe and Fort Story is being restricted for the first time in memory to combat potential terrorism incidents. The Army-directed changes include 24-hour manning of gates, limited civilian entry and mandatory vehicle registration for those living or working on the bases. All Army bases open to the public are affected. The new security precautions would put Army bases on roughly the same security footing as local Air Force and Navy bases.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
Henry "Hank" Rogers Jr., a retired machinist and a Coast Guard veteran and historian, died Wednesday at the Eastpoint Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center of complications from surgery. The Chase resident was 78. Born in Fort Monroe, Va., and raised in Bartow, Fla., he joined the Coast Guard at age 17 and was stationed in the Pacific during World War II. He remained in the service for 16 years and had been assigned to Coast Guard cutter Androscoggin and ice breakers in the North Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 15, 1996
Power rules the wavesThe 70th Annual Budweiser Hampton Cup Regatta, the nation's oldest continuously run powerboat race, roars into Hampton, Va., this weekend. About 120 of the fastest inboard and hydroplane watercraft are expected to participate in the three-day event.From noon to 6 p.m. tomorrow through Sunday, spectators will see the country's and Canada's hottest powerboats compete in five-mile races at speeds of 140 mph or more. Nine classes of boats will compete. Friday's and Saturday's races are elimination heats -- the winners-take-all finals are Sunday.
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