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By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | July 3, 2006
FORT MONMOUTH, N.J. -- Inside locked laboratories here, engineers are arming commanders in the mountains of Afghanistan and the deserts of Iraq with technology such as cell phone service, instant messaging and Microsoft Power Point. The fort's specialty is battlefield communications, and the vision is to have the Internet, cell phones and video-conferencing revolutionize warfare in many of the same ways that these technologies have transformed Americans' lives. The aim is to put accurate, up-to-the-minute information on devices that fit into the palms of soldiers' hands.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Ron A. Szymanski, who was chief software architect at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died July 26 of stomach cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 34. Born and raised in Middlesex, N.J., Mr. Szymanski was a 1996 graduate of Middlesex High School. In 2000, he earned a bachelor's degree in math education from The College of New Jersey in Ewing. In 2004, he earned a master's degree in computer science from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, N.J. "Ron always had a gift for computers, so that led him to accept an opportunity at Fort Monmouth rather than going into teaching," said his wife of nine years, the former Amy Erica Speiser.
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NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
FORT MONMOUTH, N.J. -- Kathy Sukiennik's family has been taking photos in front of the fireplace at the officers' club here since 1952, the year her father, Louis Welch, an Army captain, and her mother, Kay, a civilian file clerk, married in a Catholic Mass at Chapel No. 2 and held their reception in the club's room with the fireplace. After the wedding, her family moved several times - to Iran, Germany and Arizona - but always returned to assignments at the fort, and to the fireplace inside the aristocratic, English Tudor mansion, once a 1920s private country club complete with polo fields and an airplane landing strip.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Aberdeen Proving Ground has a lot more money to spend on contracts than it once did but not as much as in the very recent past. Such is the push-pull effect of new funding from the military's national base realignment and closure effort, coupled with tighter federal budgets and less wartime spending. The Army post in Harford County obligated $15.5 billion in the fiscal year that ended in September. That's up $12 billion from 2005, the year the BRAC changes were announced, but down nearly $2 billion from 2011.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2005
Fighting the proposed relocation of thousands of high-tech military jobs to Maryland, officials from New Jersey said yesterday that the move would cost taxpayers billions of dollars, endanger troops in Iraq and lead to a "brain drain" as workers refuse to transfer south. The proposal, part of a package of shifts proposed by the Pentagon in its latest national base relocation, would mean a net gain of about 6,600 jobs for Maryland and was warmly embraced yesterday by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and others at a regional hearing of the Base Realignment and Closure Commission at Goucher College in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Anna Custer played tour guide as the bus she was in wended through Baltimore. Look, the Ritz-Carlton Residences. There, Camden Yards. Now coming through Fells Point, the last place where Edgar Allan Poe had a drink before his demise. And most importantly: "When you are leaving here to go to Aberdeen, you're looking at a 30-minute drive," she said. Her bus and one in front of it were filled with people preparing for a move from Fort Monmouth in New Jersey to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, part of the national relocation of military jobs known as "base realignment and closure," or BRAC.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
New Jersey's representatives in Washington don't seem to understand that the battle over Fort Monmouth has been fought - and they lost. Two years after a special panel decided to close Fort Monmouth and transfer thousands of military and civilian jobs to Maryland, the congressional delegation from the Garden State is trying to stop the move. They have raised the specter of the war on terrorism in a desperate attempt to retain the base's high-tech mission and the lucrative contracting business that supports it. But undoing the 2005 decision of the Base Realignment and Closure Commission would be a grave mistake; it would corrupt a process intended to be neutral and nonpartisan.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Matthew Hay Brown and Timothy B. Wheeler and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | December 11, 2007
One of Maryland's largest military base expansions is slated to come under congressional scrutiny this week, as civilian employees at Fort Monmouth press their fight to spare the 90-year-old base in New Jersey and keep its high-tech defense jobs from moving to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County. The House Armed Services Committee has scheduled a hearing tomorrow to review the 2005 congressional decision to close 22 military installations nationwide, including Fort Monmouth, while expanding others, including Aberdeen Proving Ground and Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2005
EATONTOWN, N.J. - On the more-than-1,000-acre Fort Monmouth military base, Michael Brunskill and thousands of other civilian engineers develop the latest in electronic warfare, including computers that jam detonators on car bombs and flares that veer shoulder-fired missiles off course. If the Pentagon gets its way, most of these high-salary, high-tech jobs would move to the Baltimore region over the next several years as part of a nationwide downsizing and reorganization of the military.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | December 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Staging a last-ditch effort to hold off the impending closure of Fort Monmouth, New Jersey lawmakers told a congressional panel yesterday that plans to move operations to Aberdeen Proving Ground would endanger the lives of U.S. soldiers overseas. Researchers at Fort Monmouth developed the signal jammers used to thwart the improvised explosive devices that have claimed the lives of more than 1,500 troops in Iraq. With 70 percent of Monmouth workers saying they would quit before moving to Aberdeen, the base's advocates warned of a devastating loss of knowledge and experience.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Bob DiMichele's left leg has been paralyzed since he was 2 years old. But he says it hasn't held him back from a three-decade career as a civilian in the Defense Department. The public affairs officer for the Army's Communications-Electronics Command, based at Aberdeen Proving Ground, has completed advanced Army coursework and moved seven times for his job. In all his years, he says, he has yet to encounter discrimination. "I never met any organization or institutional barriers," said DiMichele, 53. His command, known as CECOM, is to be honored next month by Harford County's Commission on Disabilities for its efforts to improve the hiring of people with disabilities.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Patricia O'Connor lives in Aberdeen. Or, by a certain way of thinking, New Jersey. Every Friday, she drives from her cozy mobile home in Harford County to her childhood home near the seaside in Point Pleasant Beach, where she lived until her job with the Army came to Maryland. Every Monday, she makes the trip back. She's one of hundreds who haven't completely relocated - or haven't relocated at all - since the Pentagon shut down Fort Monmouth in New Jersey and moved thousands of jobs 150 miles southwest to Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
CACI, one of the dozens of defense contractors at Aberdeen Proving Ground, wanted a large-scale meeting between corporate leadership in Arlington, Va., and the 350 employees scattered in different locations on the post in Harford County. Its management quickly realized that no facility on post or nearby could handle that large a crowd. "From time to time, we need a large space," said Ed Thomas, spokesman for the information technology company. "At this point, we have to travel to Baltimore to find that space.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Dale I. Beatty vividly remembers his first glimpse of a Fisher House, a home away from home for wounded troops and their families. The former North Carolina Army National Guard staff sergeant had lost both legs in an explosion in Iraq in 2004 and was a patient at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. His wife and two young sons moved to a Fisher House nearby. "I rolled in on my first day off pain meds," he said. "I was sick and in a wheelchair. But right away I thought, 'This place is awesome.' I just wanted to sit on the couch.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The restaurants around Fort Monmouth in New Jersey used to be packed. Now that lunchtime crowd gathers 150 miles to the southwest, in Aberdeen. Javier Rodriguez, who just relocated to Aberdeen Proving Ground last month, was struck by the familiar feeling the mass migration has created in his still-unfamiliar new home. "I went out to lunch with a couple of my co-workers … and it was exactly how I remembered it when I first started at Fort Monmouth," said Rodriguez, 33. The national reshuffling of military bases that has brought thousands of jobs to Maryland hits a key milestone this week: It's officially done.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
The Army detailed more than $25 billion in contracts during a briefing at Aberdeen Proving Ground on Thursday, drawing hundreds of business leaders who are hoping to win a slice of defense contracting bounty that's shifting to the region. One communications electronics contract alone is valued at just over $10 billion. Another, for software engineering support, is worth an estimated $7 billion. These sorts of mega-contracts, once handled at Fort Monmouth, N.J., have come to Aberdeen in Harford County as part of a national military base realignment.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
With the influx of thousands of defense jobs to the state a near-certainty, officials in Maryland now turn to the task of preparing for the new workers and offering help with relocation. The Base Realignment and Closure Commission voted yesterday to recommend closing Fort Monmouth in New Jersey, resulting in a gain of more than 2,000 jobs at Aberdeen Proving Ground, and consolidating other facilities at Fort Meade, bringing more than 5,300 jobs to Anne Arundel County. In Harford, officials have been working with Fort Monmouth employees and businesses around the base on the logistics of moving, said Wyett Colclasure, head of the Aberdeen Army Alliance.
NEWS
May 19, 1991
Frank L. Kohlerman Jr., an electrical engineer for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. for 41 years and a military reservist until age 60, died May 3 at his home on Woodlawn Road in Roland Park from complications from arthritis. He was 77.Mr. Kohlerman directed BG&E's Intersystem Power Utilization Bureau, which coordinated the buying and selling of power among BG&E and other power systems in the Northeast.Born in Baltimore, he graduated from Forest Park High School in 1931 and received a degree in engineering in 1935 from the Johns Hopkins University.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
The last time Aberdeen Proving Ground ramped up in a big way, the military base was dotted with wooden barracks, temporary homes for soldiers testing artillery and learning how to handle bombs before shipping off to fight in World War II. This time, the base's expansion involves glassy new office buildings that wouldn't be out of place in a business park, civilians with advanced degrees and thousands of new jobs in technical fields ranging from medical...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Anna Custer played tour guide as the bus she was in wended through Baltimore. Look, the Ritz-Carlton Residences. There, Camden Yards. Now coming through Fells Point, the last place where Edgar Allan Poe had a drink before his demise. And most importantly: "When you are leaving here to go to Aberdeen, you're looking at a 30-minute drive," she said. Her bus and one in front of it were filled with people preparing for a move from Fort Monmouth in New Jersey to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, part of the national relocation of military jobs known as "base realignment and closure," or BRAC.
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