Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFort Mchenry
IN THE NEWS

Fort Mchenry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
At Fort McHenry, even in winter, Greg McGuire and his platoon have enough work to keep busy from dawn's early light to the twilight's last gleaming.Their orders: to defend the fort against aging, the elements and a human tide that scours every surface, from grass to glass, and compresses the earthworks.The number of visitors always increases as spring approaches, and the fort's National Park Service protectors have mixed emotions about this year's coming invasion."The British were a one-shot deal," says Mr. McGuire, the maintenance chief, but tourism is relentless and "can be an even bigger challenge than what the elements do to the place."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
One of the two bores carrying northbound Interstate 95 traffic through the Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore will be closed for several hours on Sunday morning for Special Olympics Maryland's sixth annual 5-kilometer run and walk fundraiser. More than 900 walkers and runners are expected to take part in the event in the right hand northbound tunnel bore, the proceeds of which support Special Olympics Maryland's work providing athletic training and events for children and adults in the state who have intellectual disabilities.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 10, 2013
After reading this week's criticism of how the National Park Service and the Fort McHenry administration have been dealing with the constraints of sequestration, I would remind critics that despite the site's obvious attraction to runners, walkers and others, Fort McHenry is not primarily a recreational site ("Fort McHenry bungles the sequester," June 5). It is instead one of the most important historical and educational centers in the nation, and those charged with its stewardship work very hard to provide living history at the only officially designated Historic Shrine among the nation's 401 national parks and monuments.
NEWS
By Tim Kreider | September 19, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to reflect the correct spelling of Billie Holiday's name. The Sun regrets the error.  I traveled back to my hometown of Baltimore last weekend to reprise my role as that important historical figure, The Devil, in a rock opera about the Battle of Baltimore. This was the long-anticipated bicentennial performance of "1814!: The War of 1812 Rock Opera," a project some old friends of mine, Dave Israel and David Dudley, conceived in the bars of Fort Avenue back in 1992, before we had anything worse to do. They'd always envisioned mounting a spectacular, all-star production of the thing on the 200th anniversary of the bombardment of Fort McHenry, in the unimaginable science-fiction year of 2014.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
It's summer again and the new hours for Fort McHenry were posted on the fort's gate, and guess what? The hours are from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Does that surprise anyone? It does me. Last year's hours were from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. I inquired why the significant change, and I got the infamous word, "sequestration. " That answer is nonsense. This is the National Park Service's way of attempting to show the public how hard it is living with slightly less money. A 5 percent cut in the budget shouldn't mean a reduction of three out of 12 hours, or one-quarter less public access to Fort McHenry.
NEWS
June 23, 1994
A second of Baltimore's historic treasures on the Inner Harbor is in serious need of repair. Unlike the Constellation at the heart of the harbor, Fort McHenry at its mouth has the funds to correct its deterioration. And it can be fixed without disturbing the 600,000 tourists who visit the historic fort each year. The Constellation, unfortunately, will have to be placed in drydock for at least the most urgent repairs -- when, and if, the money to do the work is raised.Thanks to the fact Fort McHenry is part of the National Park Service -- a national shrine as well as a national monument -- federal funds are available for the $3 million of work required to rebuild crumbling or eroded walls.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A new quarter depicting fireworks over Fort McHenry was officially launched during a ceremony Friday at the Baltimore landmark as part of Defenders' Day celebrations. The Fort McHenry quarter is part of a series being issued by the United States Mint that focuses on national parks and other federal sites. The America the Beautiful Quarters program, launched in 2010, will release 56 quarters by 2021. Quarters are being released in the order that chosen sites became national landmarks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The gunners at Fort McHenry readied the 3-ton cannon known as Messenger, heaving it into position behind a wooden wall with a block-and-rope pulley system and loading it with gunpowder and a substitute cannonball of peat moss. The call came: "Clear!" and the gunners stepped to the side, with one touching a slow match to the gunpowder inside the cannon. The boom rocked the air and echoed across Baltimore's harbor as a geyser of fire and smoke poured from the cannon's mouth. Park ranger Tyler Mink said the first time he set off a cannon, the experience was "a little nerve-racking.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
The walls that saved Baltimore from the British now need to be saved themselves.And soon they will be: Congress has allocated $3 million to restore the cracked and crumbling brick walls of Fort McHenry, the military bastion where U.S. troops repulsed a British naval attack on Baltimore in 1814 and a young lawyer named Francis Scott Key was so moved that he wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner."Set to begin next month, the three-year project will be the most comprehensive reconstruction of the famous "star fort" since the 1930s, when the Army turned the South Baltimore landmark over to the National Park Service.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
When Stacey Carter and her son Thomas, 7, went on their first camping trip more than a year ago, they were less than prepared for the crisp October nights outdoors. Since then, Carter said she's invested in an air mattress and Snuggies and learned to love camping. On Saturday, she and her son survived their first night at Latrobe Park on Fort Avenue, where their Boy Scout Cub Pack 162 based in Columbia was staying with other Scouts to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
"The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from "Defense of Fort McHenry," a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in the Chesapeake Bay during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. Baltimore should be proud of this heritage and the 200th celebration that has taken place over the last week. The Star-Spangled Banner is the most patriotic song in United States history, and it originated in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Alas, they still haven't found the missing star. But several fragments of the 30-foot-by-42-foot star-spangled banner that flew over Fort McHenry after the Battle of Baltimore are up for sale this week at a Boston auction house. Pre-bidding is under way for the 3-inch-by-3-inch swatches of the flag, a smaller version of which inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that became the national anthem. Bidding at RR Auction began at $10,000 but is expected to go much higher. Live auction bidding will begin at 3 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was hospitalized Saturday night after complaining of shortness of breath at the Star-Spangled Spectacular festiivities at Ft. McHenry. The mayor delivered her remarks at the event, which included the vice president and the British ambassador, before leaving the stage around 8 p.m., mayoral spokesman Kevin Harris said. She was alert and communicating with staffers and family, he said. Harris said Rawlings-Blake would be kept overnight at the hospital for observation; he declined to name the hospital due to privacy concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | September 13, 2014
One of the biggest events in Baltimore history is going down this weekend. Here's what you need to know to make the most of the Star-Spangled Spectacular.  What is it? Star-Spangled Spectacular is a 10-day festival to celebrate the 200th birthday of the national anthem. It starts Wednesday Sept. 10 and ends Tuesday Sept. 16. The events will be centered on the Inner Harbor and Fort McHenry in Locust Point. What about the rain? As of noon Saturday, organizers said all events were scheduled to go on as planned including the fireworks.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Three Vietnam War veterans stood on the ramparts of Fort McHenry, gazed onto the Patapsco where British warships launched hundreds of rockets and mortar shells almost 200 years ago, and imagined the scene that unfolded during the Battle of Baltimore. "I know rain was pouring down, and with all the shooting and shelling for more than 24 hours, they had no idea if they were going to survive," said Chuck Gallinger, 69, of Oshkosh, Wis., who served in Southeast Asia in 1966. Gallinger and his friends - in town for a reunion of their unit, the 709th Maintenance Battalion of the 9th Infantry - had stopped for a taste of the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Baltimore's bicentennial celebration of its defense against the British and the writing of the national anthem.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | September 6, 1991
IT'S BEEN 177 years since that long night of Sept. 13-14, 1814, when British ships hurled more than 1,500 rockets, bombs and shells at defenders of Fort McHenry. It was that repulse of the British naval attack that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the "Star-Spangled Banner."Today, the Fort is having difficulty standing firm. Its battery walls are threatened by erosion and its historic buildings are in desperate need of repair. That's why the fund-raising efforts of the Patriots of Fort McHenry are so necessary.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
After nearly 200 years, Francis Scott Key has come back to Fort McHenry. A life-sized bronze statue of the Maryland lawyer who wrote "The Star Spangled Banner" stands in the $15 million Visitor and Education Center that opens Thursday. Other elements include a film told from Key's perspective and touch-screen panels providing details about his life and views. It's a fitting tribute to man whose words help draw about 650,000 visitors a year to the site of the 1814 Battle of Baltimore at the tip of Locust Point, said Vincent Vaise, chief of interpretation for Fort McHenry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The clouds didn't exactly part for the Blue Angels, but they lifted just enough Saturday afternoon, the rain stopped, and suddenly three F/A-18 Hornets soared past in tight formation over the southeast edge of the Inner Harbor — the show was on for the Star-Spangled Spectacular. Thousands of people gathered at the Inner Harbor to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the national anthem waited nearly two hours for a glimpse of the team, as the rain sprinkled on and off, clouds lowered and lifted again, and the Blue Angels waited for safe flying conditions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.