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By Matthew Dolan and Gail Gibson and Matthew Dolan and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 2004
FORT LEWIS, Wash. - In Vietnam, Larry Wickline blew up enemy bridges as a combat engineer. But on a foggy, frigid afternoon here yesterday, he stood on an overpass across Interstate 5 to memorialize those fallen in Iraq this week. "I'm supposed to be Christmas shopping, but today I feel like I needed to do this," said Wickline, 56, of Tacoma, wearing a Vietnam Veterans cap and brown camouflage jacket and waving a giant American flag in the bone-chilling wind. "I'm still not sure what happened over there."
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,sun reporter | July 21, 2007
A 25-year-old soldier from Cecil County was killed in Iraq on Thursday when a roadside bomb exploded and struck the vehicle he was riding. Army Cpl. Brandon Craig of Earlville was a graduate of Bohemia Manor High School and had been serving in Iraq since April. A private first class before his death, he was posthumously promoted to corporal. "He was a great gentleman and a great young man," said his grandfather, Reginald Craig of Earlville. Corporal Craig enlisted in February last year and completed initial training at Fort Benning, Ga., before reporting to Fort Lewis in Washington state.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,sun reporter | July 21, 2007
A 25-year-old soldier from Cecil County was killed in Iraq on Thursday when a roadside bomb exploded and struck the vehicle he was riding. Army Cpl. Brandon Craig of Earlville was a graduate of Bohemia Manor High School and had been serving in Iraq since April. A private first class before his death, he was posthumously promoted to corporal. "He was a great gentleman and a great young man," said his grandfather, Reginald Craig of Earlville. Corporal Craig enlisted in February last year and completed initial training at Fort Benning, Ga., before reporting to Fort Lewis in Washington state.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,sun reporter | May 20, 2007
An infantryman from Baltimore was killed in Iraq on Thursday -- just a month after he was deployed to the country, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Pfc. Jonathan V. Hamm, 20, was at a forward base in Baghdad when he was struck by "indirect enemy fire," according to the department. The soldier is not related to Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, a department spokesman said. Joseph Piek, an Army spokesman at Fort Lewis, Wash., said he was likely hit by mortar fire or an artillery round.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,sun reporter | May 20, 2007
An infantryman from Baltimore was killed in Iraq on Thursday -- just a month after he was deployed to the country, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Pfc. Jonathan V. Hamm, 20, was at a forward base in Baghdad when he was struck by "indirect enemy fire," according to the department. The soldier is not related to Baltimore Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm, a department spokesman said. Joseph Piek, an Army spokesman at Fort Lewis, Wash., said he was likely hit by mortar fire or an artillery round.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
The New Windsor Service Center is on standby to provide services to the families of Americans in the Persian Gulf and refugees who may need resettlement.Donna Derr, director of the disaster response andrefugee settlement program for the center, said they are ready to call volunteers around the country to provide child care for the families of U.S. servicemen who die or are seriously injured in the war.The U.S. military or the Department of Defense would set up a family service center in Fort Lewis, Seattle, Wash.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun | February 12, 1991
When the gulf war ground assault begins and casualties mount, Lydia Walker and her volunteers will be among the first to care for the children of the wounded.Walker directs the Cooperative Disaster Childcare Program, based in New Windsor in western Carroll County, Md. which normally sets up child-care centers in the aftermath of floods and hurricanes.Under an agreement with the Red Cross, her group is preparing to staff a round-the-clock child-care center at Fort Lewis in Seattle, one of six military hospitals that will initially receive wounded soldiers from the gulf.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
TACOMA, Wash. - This city of 200,000 on Puget Sound can seem like one big military town, with both Fort Lewis and McChord Air Force Base sprawling to the south. So it's not surprising to hear residents sounding angry and a bit defensive when talk turns to sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad's nine years of Army service, some of it spent at Fort Lewis. Sometimes it is hard to tell what people find more annoying - that he was even in the Army, or that his military career has been mentioned time and time again in news reports since his arrest Thursday.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 2004
FORT LEWIS, Wash. -- Iraqis called them "ghost riders." The Army's new Stryker brigades earned the nickname in Iraq this year because of their speed, unusual quietness in arrival and ability to survive insurgent attacks. Unlike Humvee drivers who often plow through bomb-infested convoy routes without stopping, soldiers driving eight-wheel armored combat vehicles known as Strykers boast that they engage their enemies when the enemies appear. But the lunchtime bombing Tuesday at a military mess tent in Mosul that killed 22, including brigade members, came as a stark reminder of how mortal the "ghost riders" always were.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
The retired president of a Colorado liberal arts college was named interim president of Salisbury State University yesterday.Joel M. Jones, 62, takes over from William C. Merwin, who left this month after three years at Salisbury State to become president at Florida Gulf Coast University. Jones will not be a candidate for the permanent job."We love the Southwest and want to remain there," said Jones, who teaches a course at Fort Lewis College, a public institution, in Durango, Colo., that he headed for 10 years until he retired from the presidency a year ago. "Durango is our home."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 6, 2007
FORT LEWIS, Wash. --A court-martial started here yesterday against an Army officer who refused to serve in Iraq last summer because, he has said, the war is illegal. The officer, 1st Lt. Ehren K. Watada, was charged in July with missing a movement and conduct unbecoming an officer after he refused to join the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry when it was deployed. Watada gave interviews and made public comments denouncing the war. Watada has said the Bush administration has falsely used the Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2006
SEATTLE -- When Army 1st Lt. Ehren K. Watada shipped out for a tour of duty in South Korea two years ago, he was a promising young officer rated among the best by his superiors. Like many young men after Sept. 11, he had volunteered "out of a desire to protect our country," he said, even paying $800 for a medical test to prove he qualified despite childhood asthma. Now Watada, 28, is working behind a desk at Fort Lewis just south of Seattle, one of a handful of Army officers who have refused to serve in Iraq, an Army spokesman said, and apparently the first facing the prospect of a court-martial for doing so. "I was still willing to go until I started reading," Watada said in an interview one recent evening.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Gail Gibson and Matthew Dolan and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 2004
FORT LEWIS, Wash. - In Vietnam, Larry Wickline blew up enemy bridges as a combat engineer. But on a foggy, frigid afternoon here yesterday, he stood on an overpass across Interstate 5 to memorialize those fallen in Iraq this week. "I'm supposed to be Christmas shopping, but today I feel like I needed to do this," said Wickline, 56, of Tacoma, wearing a Vietnam Veterans cap and brown camouflage jacket and waving a giant American flag in the bone-chilling wind. "I'm still not sure what happened over there."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 2004
FORT LEWIS, Wash. -- Iraqis called them "ghost riders." The Army's new Stryker brigades earned the nickname in Iraq this year because of their speed, unusual quietness in arrival and ability to survive insurgent attacks. Unlike Humvee drivers who often plow through bomb-infested convoy routes without stopping, soldiers driving eight-wheel armored combat vehicles known as Strykers boast that they engage their enemies when the enemies appear. But the lunchtime bombing Tuesday at a military mess tent in Mosul that killed 22, including brigade members, came as a stark reminder of how mortal the "ghost riders" always were.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
TACOMA, Wash. - This city of 200,000 on Puget Sound can seem like one big military town, with both Fort Lewis and McChord Air Force Base sprawling to the south. So it's not surprising to hear residents sounding angry and a bit defensive when talk turns to sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad's nine years of Army service, some of it spent at Fort Lewis. Sometimes it is hard to tell what people find more annoying - that he was even in the Army, or that his military career has been mentioned time and time again in news reports since his arrest Thursday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2000
FORT LEWIS, Wash. - "Outlaw! Outlaw!" Four soldiers from Bravo Company shout their platoon code name as they storm into a building in this makeshift village at the edge of a pine forest. They scatter among two floors of rooms in a cacophony of shouts, cracking bullets and thumping boots, trying to root out an entrenched urban enemy. It was less than 10 years ago that the Army squared off against the forces of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in a desert duel of tanks and artillery. Today, that is ancient history.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 6, 2007
FORT LEWIS, Wash. --A court-martial started here yesterday against an Army officer who refused to serve in Iraq last summer because, he has said, the war is illegal. The officer, 1st Lt. Ehren K. Watada, was charged in July with missing a movement and conduct unbecoming an officer after he refused to join the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry when it was deployed. Watada gave interviews and made public comments denouncing the war. Watada has said the Bush administration has falsely used the Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2006
SEATTLE -- When Army 1st Lt. Ehren K. Watada shipped out for a tour of duty in South Korea two years ago, he was a promising young officer rated among the best by his superiors. Like many young men after Sept. 11, he had volunteered "out of a desire to protect our country," he said, even paying $800 for a medical test to prove he qualified despite childhood asthma. Now Watada, 28, is working behind a desk at Fort Lewis just south of Seattle, one of a handful of Army officers who have refused to serve in Iraq, an Army spokesman said, and apparently the first facing the prospect of a court-martial for doing so. "I was still willing to go until I started reading," Watada said in an interview one recent evening.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
The retired president of a Colorado liberal arts college was named interim president of Salisbury State University yesterday.Joel M. Jones, 62, takes over from William C. Merwin, who left this month after three years at Salisbury State to become president at Florida Gulf Coast University. Jones will not be a candidate for the permanent job."We love the Southwest and want to remain there," said Jones, who teaches a course at Fort Lewis College, a public institution, in Durango, Colo., that he headed for 10 years until he retired from the presidency a year ago. "Durango is our home."
NEWS
July 12, 1992
William R. Bowie Jr.Retired Army majorServices for William R. Bowie Jr., a retired U.S. Army major, will be held at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at St. James Episcopal Church, Arlington and Lafayette avenues.Mr. Bowie, who was 69, died Tuesday of complications from colon surgery at Liberty Medical Center in Baltimore.A native of West Point, Va., Mr. Bowie moved to Baltimore in 1932. He attended Baltimore City public schools and graduated from Douglass High School in June 1940.He continued his studies at then-Coppin State Teachers College for two years until he was drafted into the Army in 1942 during World War II. He completed Officers Candidate School in 1944 en route to a 21-year Army career.
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