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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 17, 2009
With heavy equipment trailers, forklifts, towing cables and cranes capable of hoisting 120 tons, the U.S. Army began the largest museum move in its history this month. About 60 pieces from the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen Proving Ground were loaded and shipped 200 miles south to Fort Lee, Va., where a much grander facility will soon be under construction. The move was the first of a three-phase relocation to the new facility, which will be nearly triple the size of the old. Given the massive and unwieldy nature of the collection, including dozens of tanks weighing many tons, movers tackled the outdoor exhibits first.
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NEWS
May 24, 2010
Nearly lost in the shuffle of events last week was the semi-official word that Fort George G. Meade will be headquarters to the U.S. Cyber Command, the new unit that will lead the military's effort to defend against and mount computer attacks. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates alluded to the decision Friday during ceremonies in which the director of the National Security Agency, U.S. Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, was awarded his fourth star. The choice will be no great shock, as the NSA is already a key player in the nation's cyber defense efforts.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 20, 2008
Sister Marie Edwina Dietrich, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of pneumonia June 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 89. Born Elizabeth Dietrich in Baltimore and raised on Cuthbert Avenue in Pimlico, she attended St. Ambrose's Parochial School and joined the religious order in 1941, attending the sisters' high school in Fort Lee, N.J. She received the name Marie Edwina and earned a bachelor's degree at the College of Notre Dame...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 17, 2010
I f it is true, as Napoleon said, that an army moves on its stomach, then some Army reservists at Fort Meade will soon be soldiering in style. Sgt. 1st Class James Duff, a food service specialist with the 200th Military Police Command, will be reporting for duty at Fort Meade this month. This is the mess-hall equivalent, I gather, of having Maryland sharpshooter Greivis Vasquez show up on your pickup basketball team. Duff is on a roll. Last week he managed a team of 12 that picked up a potful of medals - four gold, 11 silver and seven bronze - at the U.S. Army's Culinary Arts Competition at Fort Lee, Va. They finished fifth in a field of 12 teams.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
Jerry MartireOwned Italian restaurantJerry Martire, a retired restaurateur, died Monday of heart failure at the Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 82.He retired in 1983 as the owner of Jerry's Italian Cuisine in Fort Lee, N.J.He opened the restaurant in 1953 and built a clientele that included entertainers and sports figures who worked in New York, but lived in Northern New Jersey. The restaurant's kitchen became a school for Italian immigrants and for members of New York-area minority groups who wanted to become chefs.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 2004
PETERSBURG, Va. - After enduring 15 months in Iraq and the public scorn that came when some members of his Army Reserve unit were implicated in the Abu Ghraib abuse scandal, Sgt. Robert Jones II wanted nothing more this fall than to return to his civilian job as a Baltimore patrol officer and his modest dreams of one day opening a couple of hot dog stands. That hasn't happened. Instead, Jones is one of 14 members of the Western Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company - all likely witnesses in the criminal trials arising from the Iraqi prison abuses - who found their active-duty status extended just as they thought they were headed home.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
With the military unit at the center of the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal set to return to the United States Monday, Army officials have begun the delicate task of patching up its image. The 372nd Military Police Company, the Army will have you know, set up and ran an Iraqi police academy. It rebuilt courts and schools. And its citizen-soldiers hauled in more than 100 medals, including a bundle of Purple Hearts and Bronze Stars. "These guys have done some great things over there, and they have some great stories to tell," said Ann Harrison, a spokeswoman for Fort Lee, the Virginia Army base where the unit will be welcomed home at a ceremony Monday evening after a 15-month tour.
FEATURES
By Jose Martinez and Jose Martinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
NEW YORK - Her beloved Cuba may yet be the final resting place for Celia Cruz. The salsa legend's husband, Pedro Knight, said he dreams of someday taking his wife's remains from the Bronx to the island she fled when Fidel Castro seized power in 1960. "I would take her home to be buried next to her mother," Knight said. "That's what she always wanted." Surrounded by loved ones, Cruz died of cancer last month at age 77. Her death set off waves of grief in New York and Miami, where hundreds of thousands of fans flocked to memorials for the flamboyant singer who recorded more than 70 albums in a career that spanned nearly six decades.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
CUMBERLAND - In a rousing patriotic ceremony awash with waving flags, yellow ribbons and warm remarks, several hundred relatives, friends and local officials belatedly welcomed home members of the 372nd Military Police Company last night. Capt. Donald J. Reese, commander of the Reserve unit at the heart of the detainee abuse scandal at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, profusely thanked the city, veterans and others who supported his soldiers. "I'm very proud I brought everybody back home," Reese said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal agents are investigating whether several large food companies charged the government excessively high prices for supplies to U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait, administration officials said yesterday. Widening their previously disclosed inquiries into contract fraud and corruption in Kuwait and Iraq, investigators from the Justice and Defense departments are examining deals that the Sara Lee Corp., ConAgra Foods and other U.S. companies made to supply the military, officials said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 17, 2009
With heavy equipment trailers, forklifts, towing cables and cranes capable of hoisting 120 tons, the U.S. Army began the largest museum move in its history this month. About 60 pieces from the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen Proving Ground were loaded and shipped 200 miles south to Fort Lee, Va., where a much grander facility will soon be under construction. The move was the first of a three-phase relocation to the new facility, which will be nearly triple the size of the old. Given the massive and unwieldy nature of the collection, including dozens of tanks weighing many tons, movers tackled the outdoor exhibits first.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 20, 2008
Sister Marie Edwina Dietrich, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of pneumonia June 12 at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 89. Born Elizabeth Dietrich in Baltimore and raised on Cuthbert Avenue in Pimlico, she attended St. Ambrose's Parochial School and joined the religious order in 1941, attending the sisters' high school in Fort Lee, N.J. She received the name Marie Edwina and earned a bachelor's degree at the College of Notre Dame...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal agents are investigating whether several large food companies charged the government excessively high prices for supplies to U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait, administration officials said yesterday. Widening their previously disclosed inquiries into contract fraud and corruption in Kuwait and Iraq, investigators from the Justice and Defense departments are examining deals that the Sara Lee Corp., ConAgra Foods and other U.S. companies made to supply the military, officials said.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
The U.S. Army Ordnance Museum - a prominent Harford tourist attraction scheduled to move to Virginia in a military base shake-up - could be leaving some heavy-duty possessions behind. Officials say it might be too costly to move all of the museum's more cumbersome artifacts, so some could be left at Aberdeen Proving Ground, dividing the collection and disrupting preservation efforts. "There's been a lot of motion tied to the effort over the years to preserve this collectoin and restore it. It is rare and unique," said Kone Brugh, chairman of the museum's nonprofit support foundation.
NEWS
By ROBERT COHEN and ROBERT COHEN,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
The gruesome allegations of funeral homes secretly carving up corpses and selling the skin, tendons and bones to a New Jersey middleman for distribution to human-tissue processors have focused renewed attention on the trade in human body parts. Medical experts say the ghoulish scandal, now under criminal investigation, is the latest example of a growing and profitable nationwide business in body parts and sheds light on the gaps in government regulation and the unethical treatment of the dead.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
The U.S. Army Ordnance Museum - a prominent Harford tourist attraction scheduled to move to Virginia in a military base shake-up - could be leaving some heavy-duty possessions behind. Officials say it might be too costly to move all of the museum's more cumbersome artifacts, so some could be left at Aberdeen Proving Ground, dividing the collection and disrupting preservation efforts. `Rare and unique' "There's been a lot of motion tied to the effort over the years to preserve this collectoin and restore it. It is rare and unique," said Kone Brugh, chairman of the museum's nonprofit support foundation.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | November 13, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Special agents from the National Park Service's visitor and resource protection branch are investigating a catastrophic flood that inflicted $11.4 million in damage to the historic Jamestown archaeological collection during Hurricane Isabel. Enveloped by 5 feet of water during the Sept. 18 storm, the famous collection of more than 900,000 artifacts represents one of the nation's most important links to its beginnings in the first permanent English settlement of 1607.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1995
Army officials have picked the first woman in at least a decade to lead the Headquarters Command Battalion at Fort Meade.Lt. Col. Patty S. Barbour, 40, will take over the post from Lt. Col. Robert E. Wegmann on June 27, Fort Meade officials said.Colonel Barbour is a Desert Storm veteran and won a Bronze Star for her service there.Fort Meade's headquarters command, created in 1971, is responsible for providing administrative support to Army units assigned to Fort Meade. The commander of headquarters battalion is changed every two years to ensure that many lieutenant colonels will have a chance to serve at that level, Army officials said.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 2004
PETERSBURG, Va. - After enduring 15 months in Iraq and the public scorn that came when some members of his Army Reserve unit were implicated in the Abu Ghraib abuse scandal, Sgt. Robert Jones II wanted nothing more this fall than to return to his civilian job as a Baltimore patrol officer and his modest dreams of one day opening a couple of hot dog stands. That hasn't happened. Instead, Jones is one of 14 members of the Western Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company - all likely witnesses in the criminal trials arising from the Iraqi prison abuses - who found their active-duty status extended just as they thought they were headed home.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
CUMBERLAND - In a rousing patriotic ceremony awash with waving flags, yellow ribbons and warm remarks, several hundred relatives, friends and local officials belatedly welcomed home members of the 372nd Military Police Company last night. Capt. Donald J. Reese, commander of the Reserve unit at the heart of the detainee abuse scandal at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, profusely thanked the city, veterans and others who supported his soldiers. "I'm very proud I brought everybody back home," Reese said.
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