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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1999
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- In the stratified world of the U.S. military, a measure of equality is found behind these century-old granite walls. Colonels and privates are addressed by the same title. There is no snapping to attention, no salutes."That's a privilege. We don't afford that to them," says Army Col. Mike Lansing, commandant of the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, known among those in uniform as simply "the DB."Heading off to work stations in dark brown work clothes are full Army colonels and buck privates, Navy petty officers and Air Force sergeants.
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NEWS
August 24, 2013
The keepers of our classified national secrets ought to be ashamed. To think that two low-level employees like Bradley Manning (aka "Chelsea") and Edward Snowden were allowed access to the crown jewels of the national security establishment is an embarrassment. I never thought I'd see the day when an American would seek political asylum in Russia or a man sentenced to Fort Leavenworth would demand to live as a woman. What's wrong with this picture? Everything! Roz Ellis
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 22, 2007
Let's be honest. These are not your average criminals. I think I speak for a lot of people in town when I say that we don't want hundreds of terrorists brought in here."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Hundreds of activists are planning to demonstrate outside Fort Meade this weekend in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst accused of sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks, organizers said. The demonstrators are to include Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department analyst who leaked the Vietnam War records known as the Pentagon Papers; gay veteran Lt. Dan Choi, a national leader in the campaign to end Don't Ask, Don't Tell; and busloads from the Occupy Wall Street and Washington encampments.
NEWS
August 24, 2013
The keepers of our classified national secrets ought to be ashamed. To think that two low-level employees like Bradley Manning (aka "Chelsea") and Edward Snowden were allowed access to the crown jewels of the national security establishment is an embarrassment. I never thought I'd see the day when an American would seek political asylum in Russia or a man sentenced to Fort Leavenworth would demand to live as a woman. What's wrong with this picture? Everything! Roz Ellis
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 26, 1992
LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- In the 1860s, it was a swampy meadow where black soldiers slept because they were barred from the white barracks. Last night it was to become the site of a monument to those soldiers, a 12-foot bronze statue of a black cavalryman pulling back the reins of his horse.The Buffalo Soldier Monument at the Army's Fort Leavenworth commemorates a chapter of military history that is at once proud, shameful and unsung: the existence of separate and unequal all-black regiments in the Army, from the end of the Civil War to the integration of the armed forces in 1952.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
A former commandant of the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., has been appointed as an assistant superintendent of the county detention center, officials said yesterday.George H. Braxton, who most recently was assistant secretary for facilities and residential services of the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, starts his $55,000-a-year job today. He will be one of three assistant superintendents at the jail.The appointment comes after a report prepared last August that said blacks in the detention center's work-release program believe that they are being discriminated against and that a black deputy superintendent should be hired to address the problem.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | October 28, 1992
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- Twice since December, flowers appeared on the graves of 14 German prisoners here.The men, executed in 1945, had lain largely forgotten until then.No one knows who placed the flowers. And that's not the only question haunting the German POWs' graves.Why did President Harry Truman permit their hangings months after the European war ended? And why were the 14 executed contrary to a military board's recommendation that their death sentences be commuted to life?All were sentenced to death in military court-martials for the murders of three fellow German POWs, men they thought were traitors for cooperating with American captors.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's nominee to be the new commander in Iraq, Army Lt. Gen. David H. Petraeus, told Congress yesterday that the situation in Iraq is dire and poses "tough days" ahead, but pleaded for time to begin executing a new strategy. Petraeus, who holds a doctorate from Princeton University and developed the Army's counterinsurgency warfare manual, is expected to win Senate approval later this week, despite his role as an architect of the unpopular new Bush strategy. But as Petraeus fielded questions from senators of both parties about the deepening dilemma facing U.S. forces, he was forthcoming and occasionally blunt in his assessment of American odds in the war-torn country.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
One of seven remaining defendants in the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal has struck a deal with Army prosecutors and is implicating more sergeants and several officers, in what could be the most significant expansion of the investigation since it became public last year.Staff Sgt. Wayne Gamble, who faces sexual misconduct charges involving 14 female trainees, has agreed to accept a five-year prison term in exchange for pleading guilty to most of the 32 charges against him, according to people familiar with the case.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A military hearing for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst accused of giving classified materials about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to WikiLeaks, has been scheduled for next month at Fort Meade. The primary purpose of the Article 32 hearing is "to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the government's case as well as to provide the defense with an opportunity to obtain pretrial discovery," Manning's attorney wrote Monday on his website. The hearing is scheduled to begin Dec. 16 and is expected to last five days, according to attorney David E. Coombs.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 22, 2007
Let's be honest. These are not your average criminals. I think I speak for a lot of people in town when I say that we don't want hundreds of terrorists brought in here."
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's nominee to be the new commander in Iraq, Army Lt. Gen. David H. Petraeus, told Congress yesterday that the situation in Iraq is dire and poses "tough days" ahead, but pleaded for time to begin executing a new strategy. Petraeus, who holds a doctorate from Princeton University and developed the Army's counterinsurgency warfare manual, is expected to win Senate approval later this week, despite his role as an architect of the unpopular new Bush strategy. But as Petraeus fielded questions from senators of both parties about the deepening dilemma facing U.S. forces, he was forthcoming and occasionally blunt in his assessment of American odds in the war-torn country.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1999
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- In the stratified world of the U.S. military, a measure of equality is found behind these century-old granite walls. Colonels and privates are addressed by the same title. There is no snapping to attention, no salutes."That's a privilege. We don't afford that to them," says Army Col. Mike Lansing, commandant of the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, known among those in uniform as simply "the DB."Heading off to work stations in dark brown work clothes are full Army colonels and buck privates, Navy petty officers and Air Force sergeants.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
One of seven remaining defendants in the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal has struck a deal with Army prosecutors and is implicating more sergeants and several officers, in what could be the most significant expansion of the investigation since it became public last year.Staff Sgt. Wayne Gamble, who faces sexual misconduct charges involving 14 female trainees, has agreed to accept a five-year prison term in exchange for pleading guilty to most of the 32 charges against him, according to people familiar with the case.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
A former commandant of the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., has been appointed as an assistant superintendent of the county detention center, officials said yesterday.George H. Braxton, who most recently was assistant secretary for facilities and residential services of the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, starts his $55,000-a-year job today. He will be one of three assistant superintendents at the jail.The appointment comes after a report prepared last August that said blacks in the detention center's work-release program believe that they are being discriminated against and that a black deputy superintendent should be hired to address the problem.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A military hearing for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst accused of giving classified materials about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to WikiLeaks, has been scheduled for next month at Fort Meade. The primary purpose of the Article 32 hearing is "to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the government's case as well as to provide the defense with an opportunity to obtain pretrial discovery," Manning's attorney wrote Monday on his website. The hearing is scheduled to begin Dec. 16 and is expected to last five days, according to attorney David E. Coombs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Hundreds of activists are planning to demonstrate outside Fort Meade this weekend in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst accused of sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks, organizers said. The demonstrators are to include Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department analyst who leaked the Vietnam War records known as the Pentagon Papers; gay veteran Lt. Dan Choi, a national leader in the campaign to end Don't Ask, Don't Tell; and busloads from the Occupy Wall Street and Washington encampments.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | October 28, 1992
FORT LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- Twice since December, flowers appeared on the graves of 14 German prisoners here.The men, executed in 1945, had lain largely forgotten until then.No one knows who placed the flowers. And that's not the only question haunting the German POWs' graves.Why did President Harry Truman permit their hangings months after the European war ended? And why were the 14 executed contrary to a military board's recommendation that their death sentences be commuted to life?All were sentenced to death in military court-martials for the murders of three fellow German POWs, men they thought were traitors for cooperating with American captors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 26, 1992
LEAVENWORTH, Kan. -- In the 1860s, it was a swampy meadow where black soldiers slept because they were barred from the white barracks. Last night it was to become the site of a monument to those soldiers, a 12-foot bronze statue of a black cavalryman pulling back the reins of his horse.The Buffalo Soldier Monument at the Army's Fort Leavenworth commemorates a chapter of military history that is at once proud, shameful and unsung: the existence of separate and unequal all-black regiments in the Army, from the end of the Civil War to the integration of the armed forces in 1952.
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