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SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO and ROCH KUBATKO,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
Batting .130 coming into yesterday's game, reserve infielder Chris Stynes delivered the tie-breaking run in the seventh inning with a triple off Boston reliever Mark Malaska, and the Orioles defeated the Red Sox, 5-3, before a sellout crowd. Tim Raines Jr. reached with one out after being hit by a pitch, stole second and scored on the triple. Former No. 1 draft pick Nick Markakis followed with an RBI single to increase the Orioles' lead to 5-3. Orioles starter Daniel Cabrera was removed with one out in the fifth after the Red Sox scored twice to take a 3-1 lead.
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NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | September 11, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Broward State Attorney's Office is investigating accusations that attorney Ellis Rubin tried to sell videotape of prostitution suspect Kathy Willets having sex with a Fort Lauderdale city official."
TRAVEL
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Snowbirds, the winter-only residents of Florida, have been here for several months. This month, however, a whole new flock makes the trip south. Not to escape winter, but to put a rush on spring -- by taking in the boys of summer. Eighteen Major League Baseball teams have spring training sites in Florida (the other 12 are in Arizona), including the Orioles. Unlike many of the other Florida-based camps, which are in quiet outposts, the Orioles train in Fort Lauderdale, one of the more happening locales in the Sunshine State.
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Tired of its image as Spring Break capital of the world, this city has worked hard to bring the Whitbread here for three races in a row - not simply for the money, but also for the image.To be one of only nine host cities in what is billed as "the Everest of Sailing" helps Fort Lauderdale promote its reputation as the self-appointed "yachting capital of the world."It's this slightly classier image that the city wants the world to see - not the image of hooting fraternity brothers hanging out of bars on Route A1A next to the beach.
FEATURES
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Tired of winter and trash sports (i.e., anything but baseball)?Spring training is just around the corner -- on the calendar, at least. Beginning Feb. 28, you can have a sneak preview of the slightly revised, not-quite-American-League-champion Baltimore Orioles as they gear up for the 1998 campaign.Trouble is, you'll have to do it in Florida.But that's not so bad. Figure on temperatures edging upward from the 70s, perhaps closing in on the 90s, as the Orioles swing through nearly the entire month of March in the Sunshine State.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The Orioles and the city of Fort Lauderdale have reached an oral agreement to maintain their spring training partnership for two more years. The deal won't be official until the city commission and the Orioles sign the agreement during an April 20 meeting. The club has been represented in talks by executive vice president John Angelos and lawyer Alan Koslow. "In concept, we've come to an agreement and we're in the process of putting in the document," said Vince Gizzi, the city's superintendent for special facilities.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Orioles may write the next chapter in the history of sports diplomacy when they visit Havana for an exhibition game on March 28, but their international goodwill mission isn't meeting with universal approval.Soon after Major League Baseball officially announced yesterday that a deal had been reached to stage the home-and-home exhibition series with a team of Cuban all-stars, demonstrators representing several anti-Castro groups converged on the Orioles' Fort Lauderdale spring-training complex in an attempt to dissuade the club from visiting the communist nation.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Peter Schmuck and Roch Kubatko and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Faced with a financial crisis that is threatening to close the Orioles' spring training facility, Fort Lauderdale city commissioners have decided to pursue a 15-year lease that would bind the team to the municipal stadium, which has been its spring home since 1996. The Orioles' lease expires April 30, and they've been forced to consider other options for 2005 and beyond. They met with officials in Winter Haven, Fla., two months ago to discuss the possible construction of a dual complex with the Cleveland Indians, and have been involved in negotiations with West Palm Beach on a similar project for the past few years.
NEWS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,SUN COLUMNIST | February 18, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Elrod Hendricks was the first Oriole on the field yesterday.Breaking the stillness of a sunny, chilly morning at Fort Lauderdale Stadium, Hendricks, the club's longtime bullpen coach, popped out of the dugout at 9 o'clock and walked across the bright green grass carrying an equipment bag.He dropped the bag by first base, zipped it open and slowly rolled a dozen balls in to the outfield.He was preparing for a workout, following a routine he has used for many years.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
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